Tag Archives: Behaviours

Question?: Asperger Syndrome Causes

Mandy asks…

How difficult is it for someone who has Aspergers Syndrome to become a law enforcement officer?

My husband is a deputy sheriff and he was recently diagnosed (after many years of misdiagnosis) with Aspergers. I want to see how this will come in to play with his career

admin answers:

Interesting question.

It is important to note that Asperger is a syndrome and not a disease. In other words, it is used to describe a range of behaviours and it is not associated with any specific cause.

Without knowing where you live it is hard to say whether there is some stigma attached to a diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome that would affect his career path. However, you could try using the diagnosis in your favour: individuals with Asperger Syndrome often have unusually excellent auditory and visual perception. Both of these skills would be a plus for a law enforcement officer.

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Question?: Autism Signs In Older Children

Michael asks…

How do you determine a learning disability?

Is it based on IQ and if so how is this tested if a child is non verbal. We are getting our official diagnosis of our son next week and know it will be severe autism and learning disability. We can choose to accept or not the diagnosis, I agree with the autism one but how can a learning disability diagnosis be secure in a 3.5 yr old if he doen’t speak.

admin answers:

Learning disabilities are generally broken down into four major categories including spoken language, written language, arithmetic, and reasoning. Because one cannot ‘see’ a learning disability, it is often called the ‘hidden disability.’ This makes assessment somewhat more difficult to determine and often leaves many individuals with learning disabilities to suffer in silence and isolation.

Learning disabilities typically originate in childhood and if identified early, parents and teachers can use various interventions to help the child cope with his or her disability. Some important signals that parents can look for that may be a sign of a learning disability include: difficulty understanding and/or following directions; poor memory; failure to master major milestones in scholastic development on time (i.e. Reading, math, writing) usually resulting in poor performance in school, problems with reversing letters and/or numbers, lack of hand-eye-movement coordination, and other behaviours that seem out of the ordinary when considering the child’s age and developmental stage.
It will be hard for you to consider the following but it is very important: forget about stigma; later you will need to claim DLA and Mobility; a diagnosis of Autism on its own won’t guarantee this but a double diagnosis will make it easier.
You will know your own child and any medical diagnosis will not change that but it may make life easier in the future.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Symptoms

Linda asks…

What are the effects on the brain from aspergers’ syndrome?

I need to know what are the effects on the brain from Aspergers syndrome is. This is very important because i have to write a 3 page report on Aspergers’!

admin answers:

Hi I have pasred this from an article I found on the subject. You can find the rest on the source page listed below.

“Asperger’s syndrome (an autistic disorder) is characterized by stereotyped and obsessional behaviours, and pervasive abnormalities in socio?emotional and communicative behaviour. These symptoms lead to social exclusion and a significant healthcare burden; however, their neurobiological basis is poorly understood. There are few studies on brain anatomy of Asperger’s syndrome, and no focal anatomical abnormality has been reliably reported from brain imaging studies of autism, although there is increasing evidence for differences in limbic circuits. These brain regions are important in sensorimotor gating, and impaired ‘gating’ may partly explain the failure of people with autistic disorders to inhibit repetitive thoughts and actions. Thus, we compared brain anatomy and sensorimotor gating in healthy people with Asperger’s syndrome and controls. We included 21 adults with Asperger’s syndrome and 24 controls. All had normal IQ and were aged 18–49 years. We studied brain anatomy using quantitative MRI, and sensorimotor gating using prepulse inhibition of startle in a subset of 12 individuals with Asperger’s syndrome and 14 controls. We found significant age?related differences in volume of cerebral hemispheres and caudate nuclei (controls, but not people with Asperger’s syndrome, had age?related reductions in volume). Also, people with Asperger’s syndrome had significantly less grey matter in fronto?striatal and cerebellar regions than controls, and widespread differences in white matter. Moreover, sensorimotor gating was significantly impaired in Asperger’s syndrome. People with Asperger’s syndrome most likely have generalized alterations in brain development, but this is associated with significant differences from controls in the anatomy and function of specific brain regions implicated in behaviours characterizing the disorder. We hypothesize that Asperger’s syndrome is associated with abnormalities in fronto?striatal pathways resulting in defective sensorimotor gating, and consequently characteristic difficulties inhibiting repetitive thoughts, speech and actions.”

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Question?: Autistic Behavior

Mary asks…

How young can you first notice the social differences of a autistic child?

I have heard that autism can’t be diagnosed until a child is about 1 year or older. I am wondering if autistic children behave the same way as non-autistic children as a babies (less than 1 year old)? I also know that autism affects a child’s ability to interact/communicate/socialize with others. I’m wondering if a happy baby who smiles ALL THE TIME and loves people could develop autism or if most autistic kids were more withdrawn as a baby?

admin answers:

Can’t speak for all autistic children here, but my son from a very early age seemed to absorb everything going on around him; sometimes looked at people and sometimes didn’t; showed little receptive/expressive/interactive responses to the attention of others and all this was obvious from around the age approx. 3 months (possibly earlier, when the ‘average’ baby can be seen to respond in an interactive manner to the attention of others).
He was formally diagnosed with autism at the age of two.
But I knew from the above mentioned very early age that he was a little different to my other children. (Adored him no less)
Some close friends and family even stated that he seemed to be a wise soul who seemed he had “been here before”.
If my son had displayed an avid interaction with those around him (and me) as a baby, I may never have suspected the possibility of autism.
Having many family members and friends on the spectrum, I have observed their varying degrees of interaction with others (particularly the ones I have known as babies), but the one-on-one interaction before the age of 1 was generally minimal.
Some children travel through early baby-hood seeming to respond ‘normally’, only to appear to ‘change’ to ‘silent-mode’ and present with autistic behaviours after e.g. Vaccinations.
Personally, I don’t believe in the vaccination ‘connection’.
Autism, I believe, is genetic by nature.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Steven asks…

can anyone list the qualities possessed by autistic people?

I have heard some have good memory, others are good at art. Can anyone give a full detail?

admin answers:

Autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs)

Published by Bupa’s health information team, August 2007.

This factsheet is for people who would like information about autism and other autistic spectrum disorders.

Children with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) don’t develop the social and language skills that other children do. As a result of this, they find relating to other people difficult. They may also have unusual behaviours and learning difficulties.

* What is the autistic spectrum?
* Symptoms
* Causes
* Diagnosis
* Therapies and interventions
* Help and support
* Further information
* Questions and answers
* Related topics
* Sources

What is the autistic spectrum?

Autism is a range, or spectrum, of disorders that affect individuals to varying degrees. A child can have their own combination of difficulties, putting them somewhere on what is called the autistic spectrum. Some children with autism may have learning difficulties and very limited speech and communication. Other children with a milder form of autism, called Asperger’s syndrome, may have a good vocabulary but still have difficulty with communication.

According to the National Austistic Society, over 500,000 people in the UK have an ASD. A study published in 2006 has shown that as many as one in 100 children may have an ASD. It’s four times more common in boys than girls.
Symptoms

Children with an ASD have three main types of problems. These are to do with their:

* communication
* social development
* interests and behaviour (social imagination)

If you notice signs of ASD in your child, you should see your health visitor or GP.
Communication

Children with ASDs may not develop the usual speech or non-verbal (eg pointing) skills of other children of the same age. They may also have trouble with understanding meaning in spoken or written language. Children with severe autism may never speak at all but may be helped to communicate in other ways (eg signing or using picture symbols).

These communication problems may show up as:

* not babbling or pointing by the age of one
* not responding to their name
* not learning two words by the age of two
* in older children, unusual use of language and difficulty starting or keeping up conversations
* repeating words they have heard over and over again

Social development

Children with an ASD may have difficulty in making friends and getting on well with their peers. They may:

* seem very independent as toddlers and aloof when they get older
* have poor eye contact
* not seek affection in the usual way and resist being cuddled or kissed
* be unable to play with other children and have difficulty making friends
* seem to be “in a world of their own”
* not understand other people’s thoughts and emotions
* find it difficult to accept simple social rules, which can cause problems at school

Children with an ASD can be affectionate, but may not be able to respond to another person’s need for affection.
Behaviour and interests

Children with an ASD may show very little or no interest in play that involves pretending. Instead they may be overly interested in repetitive activities, such as lining up their toys or watching the washing machine drum rotate. Children with an ASD may also:

* learn to sit up or walk later than most children
* be oversensitive to noise or to touch (for instance, finding the vacuum cleaner or hairdryer deafening)
* have odd mannerisms such as rocking back and forth, hand flapping, walking on tip toes or head banging
* some may be clumsy and so struggle with physical activity

Older children and adolescents may develop obsessions such as an excessive interest in timetables or lists, and in storing up trivial facts.
Intelligence and autism

Around three-quarters of people with an ASD have a learning disability. Some people who have Asperger’s syndrome may have normal or high intelligence but struggle with social skills. Outstanding abilities with maths, music or drawing are uncommon.

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Question?: Autistic Spectrum

Lisa asks…

Can sociopaths fit on the autistic spectrum?

I’m wondering if the thrill-seeking and manipulative behavior of sociopaths is incompatible with autistic spectrum disorders. Are they mutually exclusive diagnoses, or can one be both?

admin answers:

Yes, one would think they are mutually exclusive (although there may be a few extremely high functioning autistics who are also sociopaths).

Antisocial Personality Disorder is an entirely different matter. Someone with an ASD can definitely have ASPD, but this would usually occur iwithout things such as manipulative behaviours.

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How Can I Tell If My Child Has A Form Of Autism?

In this article I will try to answer the question that I often hear, and that is how can I tell if my child has a form of autism?

As a parent, different concerns will arise about your children from time to time and it is not unusual to sometimes wonder if there is something going on with your child, particularly if you notice other children are starting to develop and socialise differently to your child.

Over time, changes can become more obvious so it is important to be aware of signs of autism if you have any suspicions.

This article will discuss

· The tell tale signs of autism like behaviour

· What to do if you suspect your child has a form of autism?

Autism like behaviour is characterised by difficulties in social settings and social interactions, verbal and non verbal communication and often repetitive types of behaviours and actions.

As autism is a complex brain disorder, not all of these common characteristics may apply to your child as it depends on the mildness or severity of the case.

Some children are diagnosed with a form of autism as early as two years old. However you may suspect your child is not responding as they should from an earlier age when they are not doing things such as smiling, following with their eyes or body, taking interest in things, pointing, babbling or making attempts at speech.

Over time it will become more obvious that your child is not developing normally so it is important to act fast on any suspicions you have and have your child seen by a professional.

They will be able to conduct an autism screening assessment of your child. Having your child seen at the earliest opportunity affords the best success for your child.

To date studies have shown that early intervention gives the best success for helping your child progress their development and maximise their chances for a good outcome.

In addition to availing of early intervention services if your child has a form of autism, you also need to ensure you have the best “team” for your child who will work well with your child and help bring out the best in him or her.

Since no two children with a form of autism are alike, there will be a certain therapies, treatments and solutions that will work for your child but may be less effective or ineffective for other children with autism. Do not be afraid to keep trying new things but do allow enough time before discounting any therapy or treatment.

Do you want to learn more about special needs parenting? If so, download my free guide here: http://www.parenting4specialneeds.com/
Orla Kelly is a special needs parenting coach, and can help you help your child.

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Autism – The Effects On A Family With An Autistic Child

Autism Awarness Cause Ribbon of Colorful Puzzle Pieces with a Cherub Angel Figurine Statue of a ChildAutism is on the rise. This is an undisputed fact. If 1 in 150 children are currently developing Autism annually, then that is 1 too many. It is, quite frankly, a horrible debilitating condition. Not just for the Autistic child, but devastating for the entire family. It requires adjustment from all members of the family as all aspects of everyone’s lives will undergo a massive upheaval.

The cost of raising a child with Autism is astronomical. ABA treatments average around 100,000 dollars per annum. The major insurance companies baulk at paying to help recover the Autistic child so parents are looking at being out of pocket at about 50,000 dollars. Even in a well paid two income family, this is still high. And notice I said major insurance companies. Some families with Autistic children are having to fight to obtain simple coverage for their impaired child, never mind attempting to get the insurance companies to pay for recognised treatments.

In a lot of families, it is impossible to have two parents working. One may have to give up their position to stay at home and look after the child. Autistic children require a lot of time and attention. Safety is a big issue and their homes may have to be reorganised to accommodate the different Autistic behaviours that the child may exhibit.

If the family chooses to go the Alternative Medicine route, all of this will have to be paid out of pocket as if it is not recognized by the Medical world, then it is not an accepted practice. Currently, you would be hard pressed to find a physician to acknowledge that there are any treatments for Autism that don’t involve medicating to control Autistic behaviours.

Other siblings may need to adjust to the amount of time required to care for the Autistic child and the fact that sometimes they are unable to do things or go on outings due to the fact that their Autistic brother or sister would not be able to handle it can lead to a bit of resentment. Also due to some Autistic behaviours, unfortunately despite parents best attempts to prevent it, some articles precious to the unaffected child may get destroyed or ruined.

It leads to little time off for the parent of an Autistic child. Their caregivers need to be specialized and a lot of times very familiar with the child to understand their non verbal cues. Approximately 40-50% of Autistic children will never speak. This leads to a great deal of frustration in a child with Autism. A caregiver or parent who is tuned into the child is able to alleviate this by having more of an idea what it is the child is asking for when they indicate. This means that in a two parent family, the parents often take turns in staying with the child thereby leaving little time for them as a couple.

In a home where there is only one parent it is both exhausting and socially isolating. Sometimes it is next to impossible for the child with Autism to go out. They don’t respond to a change in routine, loud noises or a lot of people can set off an Autistic behaviour such as screaming and/or flapping.

Also, although the public awareness of Autism has been increasing of late, there are still people who will look at you in the store and tell you to “control your child” when they are absolutely having a lay down on the floor, kicking, screaming and flailing meltdown because the lights in the store are too bright. Good luck there.

A lot of changes do have to be made. Some actually for the better. It can make the family unit stronger. It can enable you to raise siblings of Autistic children to be compassionate, kinder, more well-rounded individuals. It can introduce you to the other side of the coin and you can become more patient and tolerant of people and families with disabilities.

It may also make you as a person more vocal to advocate for families with Autistic children so they do receive some kind of financial aid and the medical world does start to recognize more Alternative forms of healing for the child with Autism thereby making insurance companies responsible, at least in part for payment.

A lot of changes are going to have to be made not just to the family with the Autistic child, but, to the community and the world at large. If the rate of Autism is at 1 in 150 children currently, who knows what it will have risen to next year

Donna Mason has been a Registered Nurse for the past 16 years. She is the mother of 6 children, 3 of whom have varying degrees of Autism. For more information on Autism signs and symptoms, and to learn more about this mother’s battle in the fight against this misunderstood condition, visit us on the web at: http://www.autisticadventures.blogspot.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Donna_Mason
http://EzineArticles.com/?Autism—The-Effects-On-A-Family-With-An-Autistic-Child&id=1057125

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Early symptoms and recognition of pervasive developmental disorders in Germany

Early symptoms and recognition of pervasive developmental disorders in Germany Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools. sign in icon Sign In | My Tools | Contact Us | HELP SJO banner Search all journals Advanced Search Go Search History Go Browse Journals Go Skip to main page content

Home OnlineFirst All Issues Subscribe RSS rss Email Alerts Search this journal Advanced Journal Search » Early symptoms and recognition of pervasive developmental disorders in Germany Michele Noterdaeme

Josefinum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Augsburg, Germany, michele.noterdaeme{at}lrz.uni-muenchen.de Anna Hutzelmeyer-Nickels
Heckscher Klinikum, Münich, Germany Abstract Pervasive developmental disorders are characterised by the presence of abnormalities in social interaction and communication as well as repetitive patterns of behaviours. Although early symptoms of the disorder often appear during the first two years of life, its diagnosis is often delayed. The purpose of this study is to analyse the delay between age at first symptoms and age at diagnosis as well as the characteristics of the first symptoms for the different subcategories of pervasive developmental disorders. The sample consists of 601 children with a diagnosis of a pervasive developmental disorder. Age at first symptoms, age at diagnosis and the type of the first problems are registered. The results show that children with autism show first symptoms at a mean age of 15 months whereas diagnosis is made at a mean age of 76 months. Children with Asperger’s syndrome show first symptoms at a mean age of 26 months, while diagnosis is made at the mean age of 110 months. There is still a large delay between the age at which parents first report first symptoms and age at diagnosis. To improve early detection, systematic screening and training of primary care paediatricians should be implemented.

autism Asperger’s syndrome early diagnosis first symptoms pervasive developmental disorder © The Author(s), 2010. Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

« Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print October 5, 2010, doi: 10.1177/1362361310371951 Autism November 2010 vol. 14 no. 6 575-588 » Abstract Full Text (PDF) All Versions of this Article: current version image indicatorVersion of Record – Dec 13, 2010 1362361310371951v1 – Oct 5, 2010 What’s this? References Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Request Permissions Request Reprints Load patientINFORMation Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Noterdaeme, M. Articles by Hutzelmeyer-Nickels, A. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Noterdaeme, M. Articles by Hutzelmeyer-Nickels, A. Related Content Load related web page information Share Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

Current Issue January 2012, 16 (1) Current Issue Alert me to new issues of Autism Submit a ManuscriptSubmit a Manuscript Free Sample CopyFree Sample Copy Email AlertsEmail Alerts Rss FeedsRSS feed More about this journal About the Journal Editorial Board Manuscript Submission Abstracting/Indexing Subscribe Account Manager Recommend to Library Advertising Reprints Permissions society image The National Autistic Society Most Most Read Social StoriesTM to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Evidence-Based Practices and Autism Inclusion for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: The first ten years of a community program » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Diagnosis in Autism: A Survey of Over 1200 Patients in the UK The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Anxiety in High-Functioning Children with Autism The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test): Preliminary Development of a UK Screen for Mainstream Primary-School-Age Children Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome » View all Most Cited articles HOME ALL ISSUES FEEDBACK SUBSCRIBE RSS rss EMAIL ALERTS HELP Copyright © 2012 by The National Autistic Society, SAGE Publications Print ISSN: 1362-3613 Online ISSN: 1461-7005

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Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy

Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools. sign in icon Sign In | My Tools | Contact Us | HELP SJO banner Search all journals Advanced Search Go Search History Go Browse Journals Go Skip to main page content

Home OnlineFirst All Issues Subscribe RSS rss Email Alerts Search this journal Advanced Journal Search » Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Jinah Kim

Jeonju University, Korea, jinahkim{at}jj.ac.kr Tony Wigram
Aalborg University, Denmark Christian Gold
Unifob Health, Bergen, Norway Abstract Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint engagement episodes. The randomized controlled study (n = 10) employed a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and toy play sessions, and DVD analysis of sessions. Improvisational music therapy produced markedly more and longer events of `joy’, `emotional synchronicity’ and `initiation of engagement’ behaviours in the children than toy play sessions. In response to the therapist’s interpersonal demands, `compliant (positive) responses’ were observed more in music therapy than in toy play sessions, and `no responses’ were twice as frequent in toy play sessions as in music therapy. The results of this exploratory study found significant evidence supporting the value of music therapy in promoting social, emotional and motivational development in children with autism.

children with autism music therapy randomized controlled trial social-motivational aspects Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

« Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.1177/1362361309105660 Autism July 2009 vol. 13 no. 4 389-409 » Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Request Permissions Request Reprints Load patientINFORMation Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Kim, J. Articles by Gold, C. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Kim, J. Articles by Gold, C. Related Content Load related web page information Share Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

Current Issue January 2012, 16 (1) Current Issue Alert me to new issues of Autism Submit a ManuscriptSubmit a Manuscript Free Sample CopyFree Sample Copy Email AlertsEmail Alerts Rss FeedsRSS feed More about this journal About the Journal Editorial Board Manuscript Submission Abstracting/Indexing Subscribe Account Manager Recommend to Library Advertising Reprints Permissions society image The National Autistic Society Most Most Read Social StoriesTM to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Evidence-Based Practices and Autism Inclusion for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: The first ten years of a community program » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Diagnosis in Autism: A Survey of Over 1200 Patients in the UK The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Anxiety in High-Functioning Children with Autism The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test): Preliminary Development of a UK Screen for Mainstream Primary-School-Age Children Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome » View all Most Cited articles HOME ALL ISSUES FEEDBACK SUBSCRIBE RSS rss EMAIL ALERTS HELP Copyright © 2012 by The National Autistic Society, SAGE Publications Print ISSN: 1362-3613 Online ISSN: 1461-7005

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