Tag Archives: Autistic Traits

Question?: Rett Syndrome Treatment

Carol asks…

Pervasive Developmental Disorder…?

What is it??? What are the causes? What does it do? How to get rid of it if you can……

THANKS !
PLEASE ANSWERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

admin answers:

Pervasive developmental disorders cause abnormal development, including social and communication development. The symptoms appear early on – by the age of 3 at least, except in one of the disorders – and last throughout the lifetime. There are five of them: autism, Asperger’s syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, Rett syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Autism, Asperger’s, and PDD-NOS are called the autism spectrum.

Symptoms of autism include difficulty socializing and communicating with others, delayed speech, lack of eye contact, difficulty interpreting nonverbal signals, intense fixations and interests, repetitive or compulsive movements, poor motor coordination, and abnormal sensory processing. The severity of these symptoms varies considerably. Asperger’s syndrome is a mild and high-functioning form of autism. The symptoms are the same except there is no speech delay. PDD-NOS is when someone has some autistic traits and significant impairment, but does not meet the diagnostic criteria for another PDD. These disorders have a genetic basis, but researchers have not yet uncovered the specifics. Some people believe environmental factors also play a role.

Childhood disintegrative disorder is when a child appears to be developing normally, then suddenly regresses sometime after the age of 3. The cause of this disorder is unknown. Rett syndrome occurrs almost exclusively in females. Infants with this disorder experience regression between 6-18 months of age. Symptoms include lack of speech, seizures, sensory problems, poor motor coordination, growth abnormalities, and repetitive movements. It is caused by a gene mutation on the X chromosome.

None of the PDDs are curable. There are many treatments available, including occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, applied behavior analysis, speech therapy, social skills training, behavior therapy, and certain medications.

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Question?: Pdd Autism

Mary asks…

Can you tell me about the medical condition Autism?

why do mostly boys get autism? can it become better as the child grows? can people with autism live normal lives when they grow up?

admin answers:

Hi there!

Autism is a spectrum, meaning that there are many “types” of autism, and the “severity” of the autistic traits can vary, from one individual to another. It’s considered a “disability” by the ADA, however, many people who have higher-functioning forms of autism feel that they do not have a disability, but are actually what’s called neurologically diverse. Aspergers is one form of autism which is actually a lot more common than one would think! Autism is not something which “goes away”, although certain characteristics can be managed more effectively with time. When a person “finds a way” to adapt to a shortcoming, the new way of dealing with that is called an “adaptive behavior.” There are also maladaptive behaviors. This is when a person comes up with a not-so-great way to adapt. Ii guess you could say it’s like a “defense mechanism” in some ways.

Boys have been diagnosed more frequently with autism in the past, although it has been found that girls “really can have autism”! For instance, I have Aspergers, which is on the spectrum, but most people who meet me have no idea. Boys have more “classic” behaviors than girls do, although in my opinion, this is because of many gender differences. You may have noticed that some more “assertive” women in the public eye are suspected (or do have) Aspergers. I think this is because their personality enables the manifestation of more “typical” behaviors. (Think: Madonna and Sharon Stone. Strong women.)

People with autism (especially the higher-functioning forms, such as HFA, PDD, and Aspergers) CAN have normal lives. Of course, if they have the opportunity for guidance when they are younger, they develop more adaptive (and fewer maladaptive) behaviors, so they fit into society generally well. Many people with AU (that’s the abbreviation for autism) follow their interests vocationally, and can be very successful in those things which they find interesting. When people with AU are creative, for instance, being in a creative field is ideal, because many creative people are individualistic.

A note about the higher end of the spectrum… A diagnostic criteria for Aspergers (for instance) is that that cognitive ability must not be dimished. (This is one reason why they give IQ tests when diagnosing.) So if you look at a group of people with Aspergers, you are 100% certain that they are all at least of average cognitive ability. You can’t say the same for the rest of the population. By definition, average intelligence is average because half is above, and half is below.) The point I’m making is that if you know someone with Aspergers, (a child, familiy member, someone at work) you can be sure that they are intelligent. This helps people who don’t have AU to give some additional credibility to ideas or suggestions. (People who don’t have AU are sometimes called “neurotypical”, or NT, when we talk about people with and without autism.)

People with autism and Aspergers are actually a wonderful societal resource. There can at times be stigma around those with Aspergers, when people don’t understand the little things that they do.

An example: Most people with Aspergers (AS) have some sort of uber-developed sense. For instance, hearing. (My Aspie son has said, “Mom, I can hear things very distinctly!”) For a person with AU who needs to concentrate, something like cubes being built in the same room, or a woodpecker outside the window can be a little distracting. A person with AS may request that they complete their task in a better setting until the cubes are built. In an office where they are not as accepting of neurological diversity, this could be falsely seen as “elitist” or something similar. It’s not, of course, it’s what that person temporarily needs in order to do the best work on the expected task. There are laws in place to prevent discrimination, although Aspergers in the workplace is one area that is a little behind-the-times with regard to diversity training…! These days, companies which have a high probability for Aspergers employees (like computer companies, engineering firms, architects, accounting, etc…) are seeking diversity training so that the company can benefit from a productively symbiotic relationship between Aspies and NTs.

Anyway, This might be a little more info than you were looking for, but I hope it’s helpful. (Explaining how to “build a watch” is a typical AS trait, and one I am actively striving to improve! 🙂

Feel free to ask more questions if you are interested. I have some of my sites listed if you would like to learn more.

Lorin Neikirk

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In 3 Year Old

Susan asks…

Child who fixates on an idea/object and will stay with it for HOURS?

I am a preschool teacher and I have a 3 year old who is constantly unfocused in class. She will fixate on something, today it was princesses, and she will NOT stop talking about it or asking questions about it. We play music throughout the day and she’ll fixate on “something being inside the radio.” Is this a condition or a symptom of something more serious? Help/suggestions appreciated.

admin answers:

I could possibly be a sign of autism but could just be that she’s inquisitive. Depends if she has any other problems such as behavioral and being ‘behind’ compared to other children. A little boy I know has autism and they spotted it early on in nursery b/c he just wasn’t keeping up with the other kids development wise and was just a little ‘different’ than the others but luckily it is only mild so he still remains in mainstream school. This could be the case for this little girl, what you’re describing is certainly one of the autistic traits but all kids differ so best thing to do would be just to keep an eye on her and if you have any further concerns then take it down the official route to voice your concerns.

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Mice With Dravet Syndrome Mutation Given Low-Dose Sedative Show Improvements In Autism-Like Behavior

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pain / Anesthetics;  Neurology / Neuroscience;  Genetics
Article Date: 24 Aug 2012 – 0:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Mice With Dravet Syndrome Mutation Given Low-Dose Sedative Show Improvements In Autism-Like Behavior
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A low dose of the sedative clonazepam alleviated autistic-like behavior in mice with a mutation that causes Dravet syndrome in humans, University of Washington researchers have shown.

Dravet syndrome is an infant seizure disorder accompanied by developmental delays and behavioral symptoms that include autistic features. It usually originates spontaneously from a gene mutation in an affected child not found in either parent.

Studies of mice with a similar gene mutation are revealing the overly excited brain circuits behind the autistic traits and cognitive impairments common in this condition. The research report appears in Nature. Dr William Catterall, professor and chair of pharmacology at the UW, is the senior author.

Dravet syndrome mutations cause loss-of-function of the human gene called SCN1A. People or mice with two copies of the mutation do not survive infancy; one copy results in major disability and sometimes early death. The mutation causes malformation in one type of sodium ion channels, the tiny pores in nerve cells that produce electrical signals by gating the flow of sodium ions.

The Catteralll lab is studying these defective ion channels and their repercussion on cell-to-cell signaling in the brain. They also are documenting the behavior of mice with this mutation, compared to their unaffected peers. Their findings may help explain how the sporadic gene mutations that cause Dravet syndrome lead to its symptoms of cognitive deficit and autistic behaviors.

The sodium ion channels in question malfunction in specific nerve cells, called inhibitory neurons, whose job is to send messages to hush the electrical signaling of neighboring cells. If only transmissions that excite nearby cells get through, the balance of cell signals that excite or inhibit the brain is seriously tilted toward excessive excitability.

“Imagine New York City traffic without any red lights, just green lights,” said Catterall. This kind of electrical traffic jam might explain the heightened brain state of children with the Dravet mutation. These children suffer from frequent electrical storms, called epileptic seizures, in their brains. They are hyperactive, anxious and have difficulty sleeping. Their problems in learning, remembering and reasoning often follow a downhill course through childhood. The children also show several symptoms of an autistic spectrum disorder, including withdrawing from social interactions, repeated movements, and restricted, intense interests. The brain mechanisms behind this disorder have been poorly understood, Catterall said.

In observing the behavior of mice with the same genetic variation, Catterall and his team saw that they did not display many normal social interactions of mice. Mice are naturally curious about a mouse they haven’t met before, and will approach and sniff it. Sometimes they will attack, wrestle and playfully bite the stranger. Usually mice are more interested in mice they haven’t met before than those they already know. Mice with the Dravet syndrome were not interested in meeting strangers or acknowledging acquaintances, and did not approach them either aggressively or with mild manners. In fact, they froze when confronted with new mice, the scent of male mouse urine, or new food smells like banana oil, which usually attracts mice unfamiliar with the scent.

These altered behaviors suggested that the Dravet mice were unable to have normal social interactions with recently introduced mice and were repelled by new experiences, even new food odors. The Dravet mice also had problems in spatial learning and memory. They were unable to learn and remember the location where fearful events occurred or to learn and remember how to escape a brightly lighted area. In an open field test and maze running comparisons with mice without the mutation, the Dravet mice traveled more, spend less time in the center, and walked in circles. They also groomed themselves and wiped their whiskers excessively.

“Like many children with autism, the mice seemed overwhelmed by changes in their environment and unable to interact socially with other mice,” Catterall said. “They also showed stereotypic movements and repetitive behaviors common in autism.”

His team went on to explore the cellular and biochemical underpinnings of the autism-related traits and spatial learning deficits in the Dravet mutation mice. They tested the hypothesis that the condition arises from decreased activity of particular sodium ion channels in the brain cells that relay inhibitory information to other nerve cells in the forebrain.

They found that the deep layer of the prefrontal cortex of the brain was the most affected by the mutation. Among the core components linking thinking and emotion circuits of the brain are the interneurons. These cells release a neurotransmitter called GABA, a brain chemical signal that inhibits neighboring cells. On the other hand, excitatory nerve cells release a different neurotransmitter that activates neighboring nerve cells. Normally, these excitatory and inhibitory nerve cells balance each other.

The researchers found that the Dravet mutation mice had the normal number of the GABAergic interneurons, the cells that fire a “turn it down” signal to their neighbors. However, a significant percentage of these cells lacked a specific type (type-1 or Nav1.1) of gated sodium channel. This deficit kept these cells from firing enough electrical signals. As a consequence, excitatory signals dominated circuits in critical areas of the brain.

“We reasoned that the decreased in sodium channel activity in these GABAergic interneurons could be rescued by increasing the strength of the GABAergic transmissions,” Catterall said.

His team decided to treat both the normal and the Dravet mutation mice with the benzodiazepine clonazepam. This drug is often given to people suffer from moderate, debilitating anxiety, such as fear of flying. Benzodiazepines also control some forms of epileptic seizures. The researchers lowered the dose to make sure they were not sedating the mice or removing their anxious state.

“The treatment with a single low dose of clonazepam completely alleviated the impaired social interactions of the Dravet mice. It also removed the freezing reaction to novel situations. They were willing to approach mice that were strangers to them and to explore new odors. They behaved just like their peers,” Catterall observed. “This dose of the drug had no effect on the behavior of their normal peers.” The effects of the drug wore off after it cleared completely from the body, which takes a few days in mice.

“The results showed that a single low dose of clonazepam can reversibly rescue core autistic traits and cognitive deficits in mice with the Dravet mutation,” Catterall said. Additional measurements of cell firing in brain tissues from affected mice showed that the behavioral effects were likely based on decreased strength of the inhibitory signals, which caused an overall increase in brain electrical signaling by releasing the restraint on excitatory neurons. Their research also suggested that the cognitive and behavioral impairments in Dravet syndrome are not the result of damage from epileptic seizures, but are due to an innate shortage of a certain type of sodium ion channel and the resulting failure of inhibitory electrical signaling.

Catterall added that the research indicates that low-dose benzodiazepine treatment could be a potential drug intervention for cognitive deficits and autistic symptoms in Dravet syndrome patients, if clinical trials show they are effective in humans, and perhaps more broadly in certain other types of autism spectrum disorders.

“Interestingly, mutations in many other autism spectrum disorders also cause an imbalance of excitatory over inhibitory electrical activity in the brain,” the research team noted. Perhaps autistic traits in some other conditions within the realm of autism spectrum disorders might also be caused by a reduction in GABAergic signaling between brain cells.

Dravet syndrome is not the only genetic disorder that has autistic traits accompanying other physical and developmental disabilities. Rett, fragile X, and Timothy syndromes also have autistic features.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health R01NS25704, R01MH075016, and R37MHO49428 and from the McKnight Foundation. This research was part of the doctoral research of Dr. Sung Han, now a postdoctoral fellow at UW, and involved scientists at the University of California at San Francisco and Seoul National University in Korea.
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‘Mice With Dravet Syndrome Mutation Given Low-Dose Sedative Show Improvements In Autism-Like Behavior’

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Experimental Drug Reduces Autism Symptoms In Mice

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Academic Journal
Main Category: Autism
Article Date: 25 Apr 2012 – 15:00 PDT

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An experimental medication was found to reduce autism symptoms in mice, resulting in improved social skills and fewer repetitive behaviors, researchers from the NIH (National Institutes of Health) reported. The study has been published in Science Translational Medicine. The authors explained that so far, no cure has been found for ASPs (autism spectrum disorders).

The experimental drug is currently called GRN-529, and has been developed by pharmaceutical giant, Pfizer.

The researchers stressed that although the results of the animal trial show promise, therapies which work on animals do not necessarily do the same with humans.

It is thought that approximately 1% of children suffer from some kind of ASD, ranging from mild to severe. Signs and symptoms may include delayed language skills, repetitive movements, social difficulties, obsessions, high anxiety, and an extremely strong desire for routine and structure.

Until recently, autism was thought to be hardwired into the brain – put simply: the autistic brain is like that from birth, and nothing can be done (physically) about it. However, recent studies have shown that certain genetic faults affect how brain cells communicate with one another at synapses, the gaps between brain cells.

The mice in this experiment, rather than having autism, had autistic behaviors. They were much less sociable than the other mice, and communicated less. The mice with autistic traits also spend a long time grooming themselves with repetitive movements.

After they were injected with the experimental drug, the animals spent much less time grooming themselves, and became much more sociable.

What this experiment does show, the researchers explained, is that perhaps drugs could eventually be used for the treatment of autism itself. Researcher, Dr Jacqueline Crawley, said (in a BBC interview:

“Given the high costs – monetary and emotional – to families, schools and health care systems, we are hopeful that this line of studies may help meet the need for medications that treat core symptoms.”

Swiss companies, Novartis and Roch are testing similar experimental medications for humans with fragile X syndrome. About 1 in every 3 people with fragile X syndrome meet the diagnostics criteria for autism.

Written by Christian Nordqvist
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

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posted by Dr. Dave on 25 Apr 2012 at 4:34 pm

How can anyone take this kind of thing seriously. I am a Pediatrician in private practice for 36 years. We have never during my career been able to agree on a definition for autism or even who is and who isn’t autistic. How is this for a quote: “therapies which work on animals do not necessarily do the same with humans.” That would especially true for something as complex and subtle as autism. It’s a little hard for me to picture autistic mice. These researchers new to check their egos at the door and get a grip on reality.

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posted by Don on 26 Apr 2012 at 5:53 am

At least it’s a start. Certainly a lot more than most pediatricians are doing to help children afflicted with this.

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posted by Ellen on 26 Apr 2012 at 1:12 pm

Creating mice that have “behavior problems” and then administering a substance that alters the behavior COULD be a step forward in autism research IF there was an established biological connection between the laboratory mice and individuals with autism. Without this connection, studies of this nature are a total waste of time, money and resources. I am also the parent of a child with autism and I don’t believe studies of this nature do anything but send researchers down blind alleys.

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posted by Becky SU on 26 Apr 2012 at 7:05 pm

While you may not be able to imagine how autism might manifest itself in rodents, I am glad that someone is at least looking into this. If you can not define autism, please refer to DSM-IV before seeing additional patients. While the scope and definition of autism spectrum disorders continues to evolve, there is an official definition. Since so many of the symptoms of autism manifest themselves in obvious physical manners, I am surprised that you don’t feel astute enough to be able to observe those symptoms. Repetitive behaviors, unusual social interactions with peers and impaired social communication can undoubtedly be observed in most species by those trained in the species’ typical and abberant behaviors.

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posted by iris on 27 Apr 2012 at 7:49 am

Medical school does not teach you the patience and dedication that is required for autistic “patients”

When you have sat for countless hours to encourage a autistic child just to say the word “doctor” maybe then you will truly understand the meaning of your practice.

Put your money where your mouse is.

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‘Experimental Drug Reduces Autism Symptoms In Mice’

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Adapting to the Knowledge That Your Child Has Autism

As a parent, you’ve never wanted less than the best for your own child. If you’re adapting to the knowledge that your child has autism, you’re likely in a state of disbelief. You may feel like you’re a failure. You may feel helpless. No parent wants to hear that something is wrong with his or her child that he or she cannot fix. However, we live in a world where disease is more the rule than the exception and we must adapt. In your case, you must adapt quickly in order to help your child live the most fulfilling life possible.

For many parents, autistic children are mysterious and challenging. They may be hard to bond with because they seem distant and their actions make no sense. Believe it or not, high-functioning autistic children often feel the same way about their parents. The key is for you to move beyond your feelings so that you can do what is right to adapt to the knowledge that your child has autism. A full adaptation, accompanied by studying up on the topic, may give you the tools you need to give your autistic child the tools he or she needs to function independently when you’re no longer able to care for him or her.

Discover your child’s degree of autism. The term autism simply describes a minimal extent of measurable traits. In other words, nearly everyone has autistic traits, it’s just a matter of how many they have and how dominant those traits are. You, your friends, or some of your co-workers might fall into the minimally autistic category without even realizing it.

You need to get your child to specialists in order to learn the extent in which your child is autistic in order to make a plan of action to help your child’s development.

Make a treatment option list. Once you know the extent of autism, you can work with a specialist to come up with treatment options, ranging from special parenting skills classes to special schools for autistic children.

Build a support system. You need a specialist you can call with questions and, ideally, a support group for parents of autistic children where you can talk about your problems.

If you have other children, remember that it is hard for them too, so make special time for them. You also need to stay current on the latest autism studies and don’t be afraid to try new things with your child.

The number of children diagnosed with autism is growing at a rapid rate. As a result, many parents are forced into roles they are not familiar with and are not prepared to handle. For more information on autism in toddlers, visit AutismInToddlers.net, a site that helps parents understand autism.

Copyright © Sherry Ann Smith

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Can a Child Display Autistic Traits and Still Not Be Autistic?

With it featuring so heavily in the media (and rightly so) a fear that many parents hold is the possibility that their child or children may be diagnosed with autism. However, before jumping to conclusions should you observe some symptoms or traits of autism in your child, it is important to get a professional diagnosis and to look carefully into that diagnosis to make certain that there isn’t something else causing the autistic behaviors to occur. There are a number of other health problems and disorders that are commonly misinterpreted and misdiagnosed as autism.

Misdiagnosis of autism can occur among the various autism spectrum disorders, or it can be connected to a completely unrelated condition. Parents should make sure to share all observations and considerations with the child’s doctor so that possible alternate diagnoses the appropriate attention.

There are five conditions within the autism spectrum, and each of them can easily be mistaken for another. These are:

1. Rett’s Syndrome – this is a condition found only in girls which was discovered back in 1966. It is currently believed by scientists that this is not an inherited condition, but is the result of a random genetic mutation. Symptoms of Rett’s Syndrome do not become apparent in babies until 6 to 18 months of age. When Rett’s Syndrome starts to become apparent, the development of the baby begins to slow and their heads no longer grow in a normal way. Normal speech does not develop and repetitive hand movements, unusual walking patterns, and torso shaking begin. Children with Rett’s Syndrome also frequently experience seizures, breathing problems, rigid muscles, retarded growth, and other health issues.

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2. Childhood Disintegrative Disorder – this disorder almost always occurs in boys, and is extremely rare. Until the age of about 42 months, the child appears to be normal, but a dramatic linguistic and social skill loss then occurs. The child may also start experiencing seizures and lose bladder and bowel control. Typically, these children experience low intellectual development. CDD is the easiest of the autism spectrum disorders for doctors to diagnose.

3. Autism – Autism itself is often referred to as Classic Autism, Kanner’s Autism, or Early Infantile Autism. Until its recognition in the 1940’s, children with autism had been diagnosed as emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded. Autistic children show many different kinds of symptoms that also occur in other physical and mental disorders, making it easy to misdiagnose. Among them are issues with sensory integration and information processing, leading to a series of different kinds of behaviors.

4. Asperger’s Syndrome – Asperger’s Syndrome children are frequently mistaken for children with high-functioning autism. The syndrome does not typically present itself until after three years of age, as these children tend not to show any issues with language acquisition and use. Instead, they commonly form extreme interests in narrow subjects, and are often known for frequent (though not universal) ability to recite full book texts or movie lines, as well as a seemingly endless line of trivial facts. Some autism-like traits may present themselves, such as the desire for a strict routine, a struggle with social interactions and communication, and an inclination toward repetitive behaviors. Some also struggle with vocal control.

5. Pervasive Development Disorder (Not Otherwise Specified) – PDD/NOS symptoms are difficult to classify. This portion of the autism spectrum is essentially used as a “catch-all” diagnosis for children who present symptoms of autism that cannot be contained by the other four autism spectrum disorders.

Beyond the autism spectrum disorder, other disorders and health problems that can often cause children to display autistic traits – though they don’t actually have autism – are:

– Deafness or hearing loss – children who have a difficulty hearing may have impaired social responses, causing them to behave in ways similar to some autistic behaviors.

– Schizophrenia – though some symptoms of this disorder are similar to those of autism, schizophrenia normally presents much later in life than autism.

– Language delay, language disorder, or speech delay – children with linguistic disorders and delays can experience social impairments as a result of their inability to express themselves.

– Developmental delay or mental retardation – behaviors of developmentally delayed or mentally retarded children frequently mimic those of autistic children, but for completely different reasons. Before the discovery of autism as a disorder many autistic children were regarded as mentally retarded.

As there are so many different symptoms of autism and the disorder never presents the same way from person to person, it is easy to misdiagnose disorders both inside and outside the spectrum as being autism. This is especially prevalent among the various autism spectrum disorders.
Grab your free copy of Rachel Evans’ brand new Autism Newsletter – Overflowing with easy to implement methods to help you and your family find out about how to recognize the various characteristics of autism.
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Autism Symptoms Baby – List of the Top Behaviors Parents Need to Watch For in Babies & Young Children

Autism Symptoms Baby

Autism affects many those of us in America and can affect a toddler in many many ways. It can hinder a babies development socially as far as his or her fine motor and communication skills. Autism is not the childhood illness it once was, where many autistic children got hidden away and not understood. Autism Symptoms Baby

There are many clinical and probing surveys being analyzed to help well being care providers, teachers and parents come up amongst better solutions to treat and manage it. Everyone agrees which comprehending the signs of autism and getting early preventative care is crucial for a child’s development.

More and !no! vitality care providers and researchers believe that autistic traits can be seen in babes. When these symptoms become evident, is when the first part of intervention should begin to permit come down the impact that the disorder can hold on a simple price increase progress. That is why it is so important for parents to be on the forefront of making out the signs and symptoms of autism. Symptoms of autism are normally seen in a kid when he or she is between a year and half to 3 years old.

Other, more benign symptoms may even be noticeable amid the first few months of a child’s life. Parents need to be their child’s cheerleader in this instance, and always monitor their developmental growth as the reach certain age related milestones. If a parent or a health care provider can distinctly see symptoms of autism in a child on or before their first birthday, then the child can get early treatment to minimize the devastating affects of this disorder. Autism Symptoms Baby

Early onset symptoms are often not noticed simply because there is not a noticeable progression of abnormal behavior, but a lack of a child reaching those age appropriate developmental milestones. Babies who display autistic symptoms will not purposefully grab for toys nor will they try to get someone’s attention. Parent’s can often think that their baby is just really well behaved and since the infant does not interact as much as other babies do that he or she is not needy. But this can be an initial warning sign that a child is autistic.

And while it is certainly true that a baby who does not cry often or is withdrawn from life is easier to handle, parents should be aware that something is organically wrong with their child if they do not need attention. Parents need to be aware that autism can be controlled if caught early, but what exactly should they search for? If you feel your baby is not attaining their developmental milestones, then here are some red flag signs that you may need to have your child analyzed.

They include:

1. If a baby does not look you in the eye, does not look intently at toys, or will not search with their eyes when their name is called can be an early warning sign of autism.

2. A baby who shows no facial emotions, such as grimacing or exuberance or anger or fear.

3. A baby who doesn’t mimic your actions, whether it’s smiling, scowling or waving your hand.

4. A baby who will not try to create consonant sounds, or imitate the sounds you make when you talk to him or her.

5. A baby who is not energized by the objects he or she looks at.

Red flag warning traits for kids are:

1. The toddler has a uneasy time attempting to communicate to you about his or her wants and needs.

2. The kid no longer attempts to talk or interact with you.

3. The child is having trouble learning the finer points of speech skills. Now, most parents will be concerned if they think that their toddler starts to have any of these warning symptoms. It’s just natural. If you have witnessed that your baby or child is exhibiting any of these warning symptoms then it is a best bet for you to call for an appointment with your pediatrician or family physician.

In fact, even if your child is hitting their developmental milestones, it is still a good idea to have them analyzed. Your child could be a highly functioning autistic for their age, but may face challenges as they get older because of the social situations they find themselves in. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Autism Symptoms Baby program now!

Autism Symptoms Baby is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Autism Language Delay – Can A Child Display Autistic Traits And Still Not Be Autistic?

Autism Language Delay

With it featuring so immensely in the media (and rightly so) a fear that many parents hold is the possibility that their child or children may be diagnosed with autism. However, before jumping to conclusions should you observe some symptoms or traits of autism in your child, it is important to get a proficient diagnosis and to look carefully to that diagnosis to craft certain that there isn’t something else causing the autistic behaviors to occur. There are a number of a greater amount of health problems and disorders this are commonly misinterpreted and misdiagnosed as autism. Autism Language Delay

Misdiagnoses of autism can occur among the various autism spectrum disorders, or it can be connected to a completely unrelated condition. Parents should make sure to share all observations and considerations with the child’s doctor so that possible alternate diagnoses the appropriate attention.

There are five conditions within the autism spectrum, and each of them can easily be mistaken for another. These are:

1. Rett’s Syndrome – this is a condition found only in girls which was discovered back in 1966. It is currently believed by scientists that this is not an inherited condition, but is the result of a random genetic mutation. Symptoms of Rett’s Syndrome do not become apparent in babies until 6 to 18 months of age. When Rett’s Syndrome starts to become apparent, the development of the baby begins to slow and their heads no longer grow in a normal way. Normal speech does not develop and repetitive hand movements, unusual walking patterns, and torso shaking begin. Children with Rett’s Syndrome also frequently experience seizures, breathing problems, rigid muscles, retarded growth, and other health issues. Autism Language Delay

2. Childhood Disintegrative Disorder – this disorder almost always occurs in boys, and is extremely rare. Until the age of about 42 months, the child appears to be normal, but a dramatic linguistic and social skill loss then occurs. The child may also start experiencing seizures and lose bladder and bowel control. Typically, these children experience low intellectual development. CDD is the easiest of the autism spectrum disorders for doctors to diagnose.

3. Autism – Autism itself is often referred to as Classic Autism, Kanner’s Autism, or Early Infantile Autism. Until its recognition in the 1940’s, children with autism had been diagnosed as emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded. Autistic children show many different kinds of symptoms that also occur in other physical and mental disorders, making it easy to misdiagnose. Among them are issues with sensory integration and information processing, leading to a series of different kinds of behaviors. Autism Language Delay

4. Asperger’s Syndrome – Asperger’s Syndrome children are frequently mistaken for children with high-functioning autism. The syndrome does not typically present itself until after three years of age, as these children tend not to show any issues with language acquisition and use. Instead, they commonly form extreme interests in narrow subjects, and are often known for frequent (though not universal) ability to recite full book texts or movie lines, as well as a seemingly endless line of trivial facts. Some autism-like traits may present themselves, such as the desire for a strict routine, a struggle with social interactions and communication, and an inclination toward repetitive behaviors. Some also struggle with vocal control. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autism Language Delay program now!

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The Cause of Autism Might be Found in Autistic Mice

About ninety out of every ten thousand person born in the United States will have a diagnosis of autism before they are three years old. Boys will have a significantly higher chance of contracting these horrible disorders than will girls. The causes of autism have not been determined as of yet, but researchers at the University of Texas are coming closer than most have yet. They have found the traits of autism such as poor social interaction and high sensitivity in mice. The researchers believe if they can find the cause of the behaviors exhibited in the mice, they will be one step closer to finding the cause of human autism.

What the researchers can do with mice, they cannot do with human subjects. They intend to examine the brain of this autistic mice and specifically the area of the brain that deals with learning and memory. Though autism affects the ability to communicate and interact with people around you, the researchers feel that the chemical reactions in the brains of the mice will be similar to those who experience autism. Proper communication is a learned behavior and your brain area that has the job of producing memory and learning is supposed to allow you to accept this information. Without the proper neurons or the interaction of chemicals in your brain, the communication process will be lost.

The researchers are focusing of the Pten gene because this gene has the history of being associated with other brain disorders. The similarity of autistic traits within the mice could be associated with the similarity of autism and brain disorders found among humans. The mice studied showed that they were not as curious as other mice in the pen. When a new animal was introduced, the autistic mice showed little interest. The same goes with an autistic child. When a new person enters the home or the classroom, the autistic child will be uninterested while the non-autistic children will show great interest and even try to communicate with the new comer.

The mice would not build nests nor would they look after their babies. They would show disinterest in any of the normal goings on of normal mice. The mice seemed disinterested in anything except their primal needs of food, water, and defecation. When exposed to stimuli such as a loud noise or sudden movement like being picked up, the autistic mice would act like an autistic child by overreacting to the stimuli. The mice would scream and refrain from physical stimuli just as most autistic children run from or cover their ears when over stimulated.

The only behaviors that were not in correlation between the mice and human autistics were the repetitive behaviors or the obsessive motions that most human autistic children exhibit. The only other similarities were that the mice had a larger head and larger brain volume that is traditionally a symptom of human autism. Researchers believe that if they can find the gene responsible for the autistic like behaviors in the mice the quest to find the cause and cure of autism may be one step closer. This research proves that there is hope for a autistic sufferers and if not for them, then for the thousands of autistic children that are yet to be born.

Read about autism symptoms and what is autism at the Autism Diagnosis website.
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