Tag Archives: Autistic Students

Question?: Autistic Kids

Donna asks…

I have an interview to work with autistic kids, I totally dont know what2 expect, any ideas?

The interview is for 3 hours!! I don’t like not knowing what will happen in the interview. I would also appreciate any info on how to act around autistic kids, i have researched on the net but would appreciate first hand advice.
Thanks in advance! 🙂

admin answers:

I’ve done a similar interview and was given the job. I was a behavioural therapist for autistic children.

Ok so this is what happened to me.
My interview took the best part of a day. (actually it was a 2 part interview, with people who passed the first part called back for the second)

The preliminaries were covered.

They’ll ask you about your educational qualifications, previous work experience, why applied for the position. That was the easy bit.

Then in the afternoon, it was much harder. More practical based. We had to do play skills in front of the other applicants. For example we were given a simple toy (like a ball or spinning top), and told to make it appealing to the child. With the parents permission, autistic students at the school assisted in the application process so don’t be surprised if you are asked to do some real life one-on-one therapy in front others.

Goodluck xxxxxxxx

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Question?: Autistic

James asks…

What do you think about inclusion practices for autistic students in elementary schools?

What seems to benefit autistic students the most when it comes to inclusion practices? What is disfunctional about current inclusion practices and what could be done to change that?

admin answers:

Autism manifests individual symptoms in every individual. The most common behavior is to ignore their environment and stay in their own brain. But there is a broad range of severity. Mild, to intense. My idea about therapy for those with autism is to introduce them to an area that has articles with different textures, whistles, drums, electronic toys like Simon says, rattles, towels, those boxes that have different environmental sounds available, metal mirrors, a hair brush, and just let the person choose. If an autistic wants to be touched, they will come to you and touch you. Finger paints are a great way for them to express their feelings. Plus they are not toxic if the person decides to eat any of them. Actually little is known about autism. It can be diagnosed, but treatment modality is pretty iffy.

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Autism In The News, 2012, Week 30

Finding and classifying autism for effective intervention

blog.oup.com7/30/12

People are finding autism in their families, pediatric offices, day cares, preschools, playgrounds, and classrooms. Individuals with autism are now portrayed in movies, television shows, news reports, and documentaries.

The diagnosis of autism is being hotly debated in the media, academic medical centers, universities, autism centers, and advocacy agencies.

How Autism is Changing the World for Everybody

io9.com7/26/12

There’s not much doubt that autism, along with Asperger Syndrome, is finally becoming accepted as a normal part of the human fabric. Even if some people still see autism as a condition that needs to be “treated,” it’s increasingly obvious that people on the autism spectrum are finding ways to succeed in our neurotypical-based society.

Not only that, but autistic people are changing the nature of our society as well — in many ways, for the better.

Autism Speaks: Celebrity Supporters

www.looktothestars.org3/6/06

Celebrity supporters of Autism Speaks, including Ricky Gervais, Maroon 5, and Yoko Ono.

Thanks Guys! (PS: Yoko Rocks!) 

Doc Talk: No truth to link between vaccines and autism – Kansas.com

news.google.com

Kansas.comDoc Talk:

The idea that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine or any thimerosal containing vaccine causes autism is not a scientific controversy.

It is an urban myth that exploded in 1998 when a British surgeon named Andrew Wakefield performed intestinal biopsies on eight autistic children and claimed he found measles virus from their MMR vaccinations. His study has repeatedly been used to claim that the MMR causes autism. However, there was no scientific credibility to Wakefield’s study for a number of reasons:

Autistic students to benefit from e-learning tool – Times of India

news.google.com

Taking advantage of the fact that students with autism are good at using technology, including computers and mobile, the city-headquartered Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) is developing an e-learning tool for these children.

The tool has loads of animated lessons supported by sounds and music, multimedia characters and colourful presentations, which promise to engage students with autism in the learning lessons.

Tattoo event raises funds, awareness for autism – Nashua Telegraph

www.nashuatelegraph.com7/30/12

When Kyle Leblanc, 19, and his sister Alicia, 23, from Billerica, Mass, entered Mayhem Ink on Saturday, they had no idea a benefit for autism was happening.
“It was a nice surprise,” Alicia Leblanc said. “I think it’s wonderful that they are doing something like this. They need to do more things like this.”
Kyle, who said he’s “wanted to get (a tattoo) for a long time,” was getting his first tattoo, a Celtic cross in honor of his grandfather who passed away last month. His sister was getting the same tattoo.
The Leblancs were happy to say that their tattoos would help raise money for autism.

Isn’t that a fun way to raise funds. 

Have you checked out our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Autism-Aspergers-Syndrome-in-Laymans-Terms/224419747646443?ref=hl
A “Like” would be appreciated :-) Tagged as: autism awareness

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Factors to consider when teaching a child with autism

Factors to consider when teaching a child with autism

Teaching a child with autism is a challenge for most people, especially for parents who have not yet accepted the condition of their child or have not been informed of the things that need to be done in order to ensure the good education of their special child.

Autism is a mental disability that attacks the ability of the child to move, communicate, think, and feel normally. Knowing this will enable parents as well as other people involved in teaching the child to use the right guidelines in the proper way to educate an autistic child.
Here are the factors to consider when teaching a child with autism:
Instructional formats or curriculum

There is no single and general effect of autism. Different children suffering from the same disorder happen to have different conditions. Each one requires a special instructional format or curriculum to be applied. Thus, the way of teaching is not based on autism itself but on the effects it has brought to the child.

However, there are general instructional formats or curricula that can be given to every autistic child. The difference is only in the approach of teaching.
What You Should Know About Autism Spectrum Disorders

Communication concerns

The way instructions are given to children with autism should not be the same as with non-autistic students. Since autistic children have difficulties understanding things verbally and cannot communicate well verbally, instructions should be given in a different way. The classroom should be equipped with things that enable children to learn even without verbal instructions. Visual aids make it easier to communicate with special children. Instructions and rules outside the curriculum that they need to learn and understand should be given in the way the children understand best. The main point is to communicate properly and effectively.

Age

Autistic children with the same physical age may have a different mental age. Knowing the mental age of the child will provide an easier learning process for both the child and the teacher or parents.

For young autistic children, parents must apply an early intervention program that will enable the child to be guided correctly in terms of discipline, motor skills, and communication. This must be done as soon as you discover that your child is suffering from autism.

Meanwhile, instructions for elementary students may include manners of integrating with other people or making friends. In other words, autistic children should be trained to be sociable in this period of learning.

Autistic children in their high school years must learn how to integrate not only with other people but also with the whole community. How to work, live, participate and recreate with other people is very important to learn in this stage.

Behavioral factors

Autistic children need guidance on how to behave by themselves and with other people.

This is because they are especially passive or have developed destructive or excessive behaviors. In the past, the approach to change this behavior was often by punishment.

Today, the approach is by positive behavior support (PBS). This approach treats the children with dignity and respect that will not only improve their self-esteem but also improve their behavior dramatically without using punishment. Special children need affection and care. This approach caters to these needs.

Tagged as: eaching a child with autism

View the original article here

Factors to consider when teaching a child with autism

Factors to consider when teaching a child with autism

Teaching a child with autism is a challenge for most people, especially for parents who have not yet accepted the condition of their child or have not been informed of the things that need to be done in order to ensure the good education of their special child.

Autism is a mental disability that attacks the ability of the child to move, communicate, think, and feel normally. Knowing this will enable parents as well as other people involved in teaching the child to use the right guidelines in the proper way to educate an autistic child.
Here are the factors to consider when teaching a child with autism:
Instructional formats or curriculum

There is no single and general effect of autism. Different children suffering from the same disorder happen to have different conditions. Each one requires a special instructional format or curriculum to be applied. Thus, the way of teaching is not based on autism itself but on the effects it has brought to the child.

However, there are general instructional formats or curricula that can be given to every autistic child. The difference is only in the approach of teaching.
What You Should Know About Autism Spectrum Disorders

Communication concerns

The way instructions are given to children with autism should not be the same as with non-autistic students. Since autistic children have difficulties understanding things verbally and cannot communicate well verbally, instructions should be given in a different way. The classroom should be equipped with things that enable children to learn even without verbal instructions. Visual aids make it easier to communicate with special children. Instructions and rules outside the curriculum that they need to learn and understand should be given in the way the children understand best. The main point is to communicate properly and effectively.

Age

Autistic children with the same physical age may have a different mental age. Knowing the mental age of the child will provide an easier learning process for both the child and the teacher or parents.

For young autistic children, parents must apply an early intervention program that will enable the child to be guided correctly in terms of discipline, motor skills, and communication. This must be done as soon as you discover that your child is suffering from autism.

Meanwhile, instructions for elementary students may include manners of integrating with other people or making friends. In other words, autistic children should be trained to be sociable in this period of learning.

Autistic children in their high school years must learn how to integrate not only with other people but also with the whole community. How to work, live, participate and recreate with other people is very important to learn in this stage.

Behavioral factors

Autistic children need guidance on how to behave by themselves and with other people.

This is because they are especially passive or have developed destructive or excessive behaviors. In the past, the approach to change this behavior was often by punishment.

Today, the approach is by positive behavior support (PBS). This approach treats the children with dignity and respect that will not only improve their self-esteem but also improve their behavior dramatically without using punishment. Special children need affection and care. This approach caters to these needs.

Tagged as: eaching a child with autism

View the original article here

Autism in the News – 03.02.12

‘Parent training’ may help kids with autism behave better (HealthDay News)
Children with autism often display challenging behaviors, but new research suggests that parents can learn to better handle tantrums and aggression, which may improve their child’s overall functioning. Read more. 

Grants Available for Autism Services (Penn Live)
Families with children and adults who cope with Autism Spectrum Disorder are eligible for mini-grant to help with the costs associated with the disorder, Rep. RoseMarie Swanger announced this week. Read more. 

Autism training for teachers clears hurdle (Roanoke, Va.)
A bill intended to require specialized training for teacher aides who work with autistic students barely made it out of a Senate committee Thursday after senators noticed the bill doesn’t provide funds for the training. Read more.

Autism groups to merge (StlToday.com)
The local nonprofit groups Life Skills for adults with developmental disabilities and TouchPoint Autism Services will merge their organizations as of July 1 to support a growing number of adults with autism. Read more.

State Senate Committee Hold Hearing for Autism Insurance Bill (My Fox Detroit)
t was standing room only as a state Senate committee heard testimony Thursday on a new bill that would mandate insurance coverage for autism treatment in Michigan. Read more. 

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.

Be the first to like this post.

View the original article here

Autism in the News – 03.01.12

SPOTLIGHT: Teachers of autistic students use iPads (Glen Gllyn, Ill.)
Teachers of students with autism say it’s the year of the iPad. It provides motivation. It helps with therapy and handwriting practice. It even models appropriate ways to share toys or take turns. Read more.

Autism, clean stream projects win fair (Muskogee Phoenix)
Winning exhibits at the Muskogee Regional Science & Engineering Fair could help people with autism communicate and help clean area streams. Read more. 

Autism Associates Comes to the Area (Perkiomen Valley)
Debbie Greenwald, Autism Specialist, Board Certified associate Behavior Analyst, Relationship Development Intervention (RDI) Certified Consultant, is the founder of Autism Associates – a program that provides services for families affected by autism and other neurological disorders. Read more.

Autism Speaks prepares for walk, 5K Sunday in West Palm Beach (Palm Beach Daily News)
Being connected has its benefits. When their then-2-year-old grandson Christian was diagnosed with autism in 2004, Bob and Suzanne Wright of Palm Beach and New York let their fingers do the walking. The developmental disease took their grandson’s ability to talk. Read more.

Autism coverage bill clears House (The Salt Lake Tribune)
A bill that would qualify hundreds of young children with autism for Medicaid coverage during a two-year pilot program passed easily through the House Wednesday on its way to the Senate. Read more. 

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.

Be the first to like this post.

View the original article here

Working With Children With Autism In The Classroom – Understanding The Right Autism Treatment For Autistic Children

Working With Children With Autism In The Classroom

Autism is often misunderstood. Autism treatment, particularly in the areas of gobbledygook and social skills, is extremely crucial and should be began the first part of on to assist increase the chance of developing gobbledygook and social skills. Working With Children With Autism In The Classroom

With the mainstreaming of classrooms, it is important to offer a few special adjustments for autistic students. Autism attention does not cause important changes to be made. In fact, unrest are traditionally not a good truth when it comes to working with autistic children. A set routine where the child knows what to expect next is an important part of autism treatment.

Changes are difficult to process and can cause increased anxiety and even behavioral outbursts. Keeping a tight schedule will help the child to feel safe. If the classroom becomes chaotic, the autistic student may need to regroup in a safe, quiet setting. A time out area is made for this. This time-out area is not a punishment, it is a place that the autistic child feels safe and is able to calm down and relax when their world has been turned upside down. Working With Children With Autism In The Classroom

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Autistic children have impaired abilities when it comes to social skills. This includes the ability to communicate effectively in many cases. An autistic child thinks quite literally and doesn’t always have a good command of language skills. Words do not necessarily come easily or even have meaning. While we are able to express our thoughts and feelings in words, an autistic child thinks in a more concrete form; pictures/images express the thoughts and meanings that an autistic child experiences.

Pictures or note cards can be used as visual aids to help autistic children communicate. When speech is achieved, visual aids may still be needed. If the child gets frustrated or just can’t put what needs to be said into words pictures create an easy, less stressful way to communicate. Another way to help increase communication skills is to pay attention to what is said. Autistic children often have episodes of echolalia, a form of repetitive speech.

Most of the time a repeated phrase has been related to something and it is what is easily said, although it is not necessarily what the child is trying to tell you. It becomes your job to figure out what those words mean. Perhaps it is the feelings that are evoked when they hear their favorite cartoon character say a phrase. Taking notes will help you to keep track of what phrases are used in which context, and soon you should be able to see a pattern. Working With Children With Autism In The Classroom

When you are working with autism in the classroom you need to watch for patterns the student has. These patterns may not mean anything to you or even make any sense to you but they are important to the child. If you want to assist the child to gain social skills as well as language, you need to encourage speech. Starting with sign language is often helpful. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Working With Children With Autism In The Classroom program now!

Working With Children With Autism In The Classroom is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Students With Autism – Autism and Instruction Methods That Work Best in School

Students With Autism

Autism and instruction strategies in children must be personal in condition to swell the largest degree of success. Children with autism continually managed to discover at the same rate as non-autistic children, and therefore very some modifications ought to be built for autism and instruction methods to cater to the autistic children’s weird needs. The following list includes autism instruction strategies that have been known to help autistic children in the classroom. These are only broad descriptions as any practiced strategies must be child-specific, depending on the individual’s needs, symptoms, and strengths.

1. Autistic children tend to be visual learners. Therefore, a visual structure to the overall learning environment should be carefully designed in order to allow the child to clearly see and comprehend expectations of him or her. This should include clearly defined workstations and other basic elements of the classroom. Visual schedules are also an important part of the classroom’s visual structure, as they allow the autistic child to benefit from a predictable routine where the expectations are laid out specifically in a visual way. This minimizes unexpected occurrences and allows students to anticipate and prepare for transitions in their day.

2. Stimulation in the classroom – especially visual and auditory – should be carefully considered and controlled, whenever possible. Many autistic students can be easily over-stimulated by visual and auditory input and may have a challenging time processing their lessons should they be distracted or overwhelmed by sounds, lights, or images that cannot be properly managed. Workstations should be set away from any excessive auditory and visual stimulation (especially sounds, movements, and any flickering or bright lights) to allow for optimal concentration and learning.

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3. Many autistic children struggle with – or have yet to develop – communication skills, especially with regards to expressive communication skills. Instruction for non-verbal students may also be required. An augmentative communication system (methods or devices to aid communication) can be greatly beneficial to autistic students of all communication levels. This could include strategies such as PECS (picture exchange communication system), where picture cards are used to express words for objects, feelings, concepts, places, and other areas where words would typically be helpful. Students With Autism

4. Instruction of social skills has typically been among the more challenging aspects of the curriculum. Overall, it is best to teach social skills very directly. Autistic students will not normally develop social skills through simple interaction within social environments. Instead, they must learn their social interaction skills in the same way that other academic topics and skills are taught.

5. A high priority should be placed on instruction of literacy. The reason for this is that many autistic students often depend on one form of communication for another, even if they are capable of communicating verbally. Frequently, a kind of back-up form of expressive communication is required especially for when the child is feeling upset or overwhelmed. Though PECS is effective, with literacy in the student, communication – even non-verbal communication – can occur at a might higher level, as it opens up a greater vocabulary for expression.

Autism and instruction strategies are exceptionally unique. Before beginning to work with an autistic child, it is important to be aware of the individual needs of that child, and the characteristics of autism exhibited by that child. Instructors and other school staff working with the child should be provided with training about at least the basic features of autism. Every member of the team working with the child should understand the child’s needs as well as teaching strategies such as those listed above, so that they may maximize the child’s potential for successful learning. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Students With Autism program now!

Students With Autism is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try the program and change child’s life forever!
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