Tag Archives: Autistic Children

Question?: Autistic Kids

Donna asks…

I have an interview to work with autistic kids, I totally dont know what2 expect, any ideas?

The interview is for 3 hours!! I don’t like not knowing what will happen in the interview. I would also appreciate any info on how to act around autistic kids, i have researched on the net but would appreciate first hand advice.
Thanks in advance! 🙂

admin answers:

I’ve done a similar interview and was given the job. I was a behavioural therapist for autistic children.

Ok so this is what happened to me.
My interview took the best part of a day. (actually it was a 2 part interview, with people who passed the first part called back for the second)

The preliminaries were covered.

They’ll ask you about your educational qualifications, previous work experience, why applied for the position. That was the easy bit.

Then in the afternoon, it was much harder. More practical based. We had to do play skills in front of the other applicants. For example we were given a simple toy (like a ball or spinning top), and told to make it appealing to the child. With the parents permission, autistic students at the school assisted in the application process so don’t be surprised if you are asked to do some real life one-on-one therapy in front others.

Goodluck xxxxxxxx

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Question?: Pdd Autism

Paul asks…

What is Autism exactly-I have an autistic sister?

I would like to understand her situation better. I don’t live with her so when ever I do see her (which is like maybe once every 5 months, if that) she’s a little hard to handle. She’s very hyper. And she’s got more problems other than just autism.

But what is autism exactly? I just want to understand my baby sister more.

admin answers:

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that begins at birth or within the first two-and-a-half years of life. Most autistic children are perfectly normal in appearance, but spend their time engaged in puzzling and disturbing behaviors which are markedly different from those of typical children. Less severe cases may be diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or with Asperger’s Syndrome (these children typically have normal speech, but they have many “autistic” social and behavioral problems).

It used to be thought that autism is just a fate that you accept.The good news is that there are now a wide variety of treatment options which can be very helpful. Some treatments may lead to great improvement, and others may have little or no effect, but a good starting point would be the parent ratings of biomedical interventions, which presents the responses of over 25,000 parents in showing the effectiveness of various interventions on their own child.

ARI’s Diagnostic Checklist, Form E-2, was developed by Dr. Bernard Rimland to diagnose children with Kanner’s syndrome (which is also known as ‘classical autism’). Many parents and professionals have also used the E-2 checklist to assist in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You can print out, complete the checklist, and then mail it to ARI for scoring. Our staff will analyze the responses and send you a score along with an interpretation. The checklist is available in 17 different languages. There is no charge for this service.

How Common is it? For many years autism was rare – occurring in just five children per 10,000 live births. However, since the early 1990’s, the rate of autism has increased exponentially around the world with figures as high as 60 per 10,000. Boys outnumber girls four to one. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control reported that 1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism.

What is the Outlook? Age at intervention has a direct impact on outcome–typically, the earlier a child is treated, the better the prognosis will be. In recent years there has been a marked increase in the percentage of children who can attend school in a typical classroom and live semi-independently in community settings. However, the majority of autistic persons remain impaired in their ability to communicate and socialize.

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Question?: Autistic

Steven asks…

What should I get for my autistic sister for Christmas?

My autistic sister is 9 years and I have know clue what to get her for Christmas! I can’t buy anything because I have no cash. She likes smart phones but I can’t get her a real one. Any homemade gift ideas she would like?

admin answers:

Spend time with her
Do something she likes
She would like that more than anything

A card would be fine, she would love that

My autistic 11 girl want and iphone or ipad
They say that ipad are really good for autistic children
There a group that one a way to someone in each state, maybe see if you could fine the group and write about your sister. I saw it on the news, when they went to my state

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Lisa asks…

How to handle a child with autism?

I have a little boy that goes to my church that is 5 years old. He has autism. I am asked by his grandmother to watch him ALOT. He always runs away or misbehaves and i have no training in this type of disease. How do you communicate and talk to kids with autism?
As I said in this question, I know NOTHING about autism. I don’t mean to affend in any way

admin answers:

First of all i have a child with autism and its not a disease and as a parent with a child with autism you just offened me its a devlopmetl disabilty please dont put it that way

in my words it would be like 100 pages i found a good list for you

Social management
Behavioural management
Scholastic management

Autism is a communication disorder characterised by a child’s inability to relate to the outside world – physically and emotionally. These children are usually hypersensitive to external environmental stimuli and seem to be withdrawn into an inside world only they have access to. In such a situation, autistic children need special and individualised care from their parents and other caregivers. Here are some guidelines to help deal with an autistic child’s needs.

Social management:

Try to make eye contact with the child.

Organise the child’s environment and daily activities into a routine. Autistic children respond well to routine, which helps them to create order in their world. This could be done by keeping fixed times for food, play and other activities like taking a bath, sleeping, etc.

Provide prior warning of any change in routine – physical or otherwise. For example, if the furniture of the child’s room needs to be moved, the child should be told and allowed to get used to the idea, before the change is made.

Getting angry at the child’s tantrum will not help. In such a case, it is better to allow the child to calm down and then repeat the instructions.

Taking the child to crowded places should be avoided, at least till behavioural therapy has made him more accepting of such outings.

Behavioural management:

Talk to the child in simple and uncomplicated language. Long and subtle sentences should be avoided. For example, instead of saying, “Rahul, would you please come and sit here”, it is better to say, “Rahul, sit here” while pointing to the destination with a finger.

Touch the child often. Though an autistic child will frequently rebuff any effort to touch, research has shown that they begin to respond to touch sooner or later. Instead of making overt efforts to touch the child, a parent should try to make subtle advances like lead the child by holding the arm lightly, or a gentle nudge from behind etc.

The child should be talked to often, rather than waiting for him to initiate conversation. Any effort to talk on the child’s part should be effusely praised. Gradually the child can be encouraged to initiate conversation on his own.

Taking the child’s name every time he is addressed is essential. However, pronouns should be taken care of while talking to him since most autistic children who talk tend to reverse pronouns, using “You” instead of “I” and vice versa. So it may be better to say, “Rahul, YOU can have toast”, rather than “Rahul can have toast”.

It is better to ensure consistency in discipline and demands since autistic children tend to take everything literally. Once a limit or target has been set, it is better to adhere to it at that time. For example, if the time for play has been set for 4 o clock and the parent wants to postpone it, it is better to tell the child, “Rahul we will play at 5”, rather than saying, “We will do that later”.

Scholastic management:

Use visual media as far as possible with background auditory stimuli. For example, while telling a story, the child should preferably be shown a picture book simultaneously. Unlike other children, an autistic child might like to hear the same story everyday providing him with a sense of routine and order.

Give clear, simple and literal tasks to a child to complete and let him finish it before moving on to another activity.

Do not rush the child into keeping pace with others.

The teaching material may be increased in complexity with time.

The child should be encouraged to interact with peers.

Positive reinforcement should be given if the child makes eye contact, speaks, completes an activity or curbs repetitive behaviour. Praise should be effusive. For example., say “Rahul that was excellent. You have done well”, instead of “That was good”.

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Question?: Autistic Angry Outbursts

James asks…

Would it be a huge issue if your autistic child hates receiving discipline as if it were a sensory issue?

Would it be a huge issue if your child with autism had an issue with being disciplined. If a you or someone got angry with him or her, it would cause outbursts and panic as if the child has the ability to have stronger anger than yours or someone whoever gets hard on the child. Even if the child is scared into submission it would make things worse. Would getting angry, frustrated, upset and / or panicky whenever disciplined be a huge issue? It’s discipline which children hate and autistic children tend to hate it more than children. They would hate it so much, it would cause explosive meltdowns. IT would be as if children with autism don’t care who the boss is and would tend to have control over the boss no matter how authoritative.
Does your autistic child have this issue? How big of an issue is it? Do you get frustrated that disciplinary action will make things worse? Does it ruin your marriage having an autistic son with such an issue? Do you feel like your child will never learn?

admin answers:

My autistic child does have this issue to a degree.
I agree with the op that routine is very very much needed.
It does make it more challenging as some autistic children also have sensory issues. My son is hyposensitive (not sensitive enough) to pain and needing lots of pressure.
I’ve even come down to spanking him sometimes to get the point accross. (you know, for safety issues)
It is also difficult because autistic children don’t understand emotions really well. Sometimes I’ll have to tell my son quite clearly, “I am angry’ or I am NOT happy to tell him how I feel.. Or yell.. To communicate those emotions.
Sometimes I feel like my son will never learn, but I know he will .. Eventually. Over time, I have seen what my son used to do, but now doesn’t do a certain behavior anymore.
I wouldn’t say ‘ruin’ is the right word to describe a marriage with a special needs child in the mix. It definitely makes it more stressful, and a little bit more strain on a marriage. Just as you adapt to having a special needs child, you adapt to fit your son/daughter’s needs and adjust the time that is needed to spend on your child.

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Question?: Autistic Angry Outbursts

Robert asks…

Parents of Older Autistic Children w/ Aggression?

I have been using Safe Crisis Management holds for my son’s aggressive “outbursts” since he was diagnosed (PDDNOS). I have been having some problems lately due to the fact he’s getting bigger and is very flexible.

Earlier today Austins in-home therapist pushed him a bit to far and he lost it. Once I got him in the hold he began to wiggle and fight. He threw his head back and managed to bust my lip a bit and when I tried to steady his head he turned and bit my arm leaving a decent little bruise.

I was calm through it all, and finally managed to get him calmed down. But once he went back to his therapist and my husband got home, I locked myself in the bathroom and seriously considered pulling my hair out LOL. I asked his therapist for advice, but he was no help at all.

Did you have this problem when your child got older? If they were able to overpower the holds, what did you do to keep them from harming themselves/others?
No judging my son, especially if you have no experience with children on the spectrum. He is the sweetest kid on the planet 90% of the time. He just has trouble expressing his “bad moods”.
Erin: I hope it works out with your son. I’ve been through the pre-diagnosis phase, it’s rough. Austin is 8 now, and generally his episodes will send him “after people”. He won’t really sit still through it.

admin answers:

Well, my son is 2 1/2 years old, and not yet been diagnosed with autism, but we believe he has it. He has the same outbursts that you describe your son to have. I have tried holds as well, but all it does is hurt us both. I really don’t have that great of an answer for you, but I do know that you need to keep yourself safe as well as your son. My son will usually stop when he wants to, and I’ve found that the holds just made him angrier. What I do may sound terrible, but it’s the best way I’ve found so far. I have a big, soft chair that I set him in and just let him go. He can’t really hurt himself on this chair, it’s very soft and it’s over-sized. Maybe try something like that, just let the outburst run its course, while making sure he stays safe and doesn’t hurt himself. To me, it’s better than you getting a busted nose or something, and then not being able to help him through is problem because you have something you need to tend to on yourself.

Good luck, if you find any better advice, let me know.

Edit: I am really sorry to hear that. Nick’s a little bit the same way, until I sit him down and let him go at it in his chair. He’ll come hit and kick and bite me, hit his little brother, and the works. Plus, he beats himself up something fierce. I don’t have any better advice for you, but I think, if that therapist saw it, he should have been of more help. Maybe you should get another therapist? I don’t know, but I think they should be able to help with that.

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Question?: Autistic Behavior

Nancy asks…

What would be the steps to take for someone who wants to work with Autistic children?

I’m 17 and I want to work to work with Autistic children and their family. I have a nephew with Autistic characteristics and a cousin who’s autistic and I want to be in a field where I help autistic children and their families. What type of classes would I have to take in college?

admin answers:

You would take classes in early childhood development, and child psychology to start. A class in behavioral analysis would be valuable as well as behavior management.

Learning about speech therapy and sign language would be great tools to have and increase your value to employers and families in the future as well. Being bilingual English/spanish would really open more doors for you. There are not enough therapists with a good command of both languages, and the Spanish speaking population is often very underserved in this area.

Here’s a great website with a list and description of courses that would be valuable http://www.universalclass.com/i/subjects/specialed.htm

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Question?: Autism Signs In Toddler Girls

Michael asks…

Does my son just have a speech delay or is it something more?? Maybe autism?

So I already know that he has a speech delay & I am already planning on taking him to get evaluated. But I just want some opinions from some other moms out there, especially mothers with sons. Okay I have a 3 year old son, he speaks a lot actually, ask him his name & he responds with both his 1st & last name. He knows his age, he knows his colors (but always calls red, blue for some reason lol) He can count 1-30 & recognizes all of them including the number 100. He knows a lot of shapes, when he sees a stop sign he says octagon. He also knows his ABCS & recognizes them & will sing the whole alphabet song clear as day. He follows directions, I tell him to pick up his toys & he will. He’ll sit down when I tell him to, etc. He even will comfort his little brother when he’s crying and says It’s okay baby, I’m sorry. Shhhh be quiet. He will let me know what he wants, I want a drink a water. Or I want cheese, popsicle, juice, milk, poptart, chicken, fries, cereal etc. Also since I’m mentioning food, he’s very picky, he’s only ate pizza once & that was when he was 1, he won’t try cheeseburgers, sandwiches, etc. He’s very sweet & loves to cuddle. He’s a little too social sometimes & embarrasses me at the store b/c he says hi to pretty much everyone he encounters. He loves other children but also I can see that they don’t accept him sometimes. Like maybe he’s trying to hard to be their friend. I’m trying to teach him that you can’t just expect everyone to give you attention. Anyway there’s one HUGE concern of mine… he sometimes, to converse will repeat exactly what I am saying or what the other person is saying like for an example, you say Hi Gavyn & he will say Hi Gavyn back… I know its echolalia. I hear autistic children have it sometimes but also I hear children with just a simple speech delay have it. I’m just scared though for him b/c I do feel like little kids are being overdiagnosed these days so a part of me wants to protect him from the label & that its my job as his mother to protect him but then at the same time I want him to get the help he needs if it is something serious. He has been a stay at home kid since day 1. My husband & I have been trying to think if we should home school or not but I would really like him to have the whole public school experience & make friends. To me he’s just a normal boy but sometimes I do catch people looking at him weird especially when he repeats stuff. So I was wondering was your son like this as well? Did he end up being okay? I just love my son so much & want the best for him. Any opinion is appreciated. Thanks

admin answers:

From what you posted…it doesn’t seem like he has Autism. My son is now 8, when he was a toddler I thought he may be Autistic because of some of his behaviours. He had a speech delay and sensory issues but…not Autistc. Alot of kids have Autistic traits, some adults also. My main concern with my son was flapping his arms. That is a charactaristic of Autism but also a sensory thing. I was told by alot of people..he is fine, he will grow out of it. BUT…i went ahead and got him tested. I had to because…what if? So..relax…get your son tested to be sure. He seems very vocal and very smart. Alot of times children that are very smart…have quirks.

Home Schooling is something I never concidered….it wasn’t for me. I have a friend who homeschools her 4 children. She sent them all to preschool and kindergarden. She was is a teacher, but isn’t working in a school. I asked her why she sent her kids to preschool and kindergarden. She said, she wanted them to go to learn to be social, learn to be around alot of other kids, and make there own friends, and have that backround. . At that age learning to share with others, and be around other kids was important to her. She also gives the choice. She homeschools 1st and 2nd grade, then asks the children if they want to to to school, or homeschool. They have all chosen to homeschool. They are lovely girls and very social. To me, it could be there personalities but..all of them are very outgoing and try hard to make frineds..which is good, but makes me wonder if they “need” to be in a classroom. But they are able to make that choice. The do have friends, they are in karate, and go to a homeschool group once or twice a week, and are very involved in there church and go to chruch school.

What is his speech delay? Seems like he talks alot. Lisp, studdering?

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Teenagers

Linda asks…

gluten and cassien free diet for autistic children?

I have heard that a gluten and casein free diet helps the symptoms of autism, has anyone tried it with positive results?

admin answers:

A version of gluten and casein diet is called the “whole plant based diet.” It shuns excess oils, fats, sugars, salt, and processed ingredients. The food is prepared from whole plant based ingredients rather than being commercially processed. Diet drinks contain aspartame which is deleterious to health.

Even with “healthy” children, this diet results in improvements in health and behaviors. Sadly, the AMA fights successful and inexpensive alternative treatments that do not involve drugs. This way of eating has been proven to reduce risks of vascular disease, cancer, diabetes, gout, osteoporosis, and many other diseases that relate to diet. Some dementias are related to vascular health, and this diet helps this condition. Your family will be more alert and alive by eating this way. The book “Fasting and Eating for Health” by Dr. Joel Fuhrman explains some of this. Many people claim that the mercury used as a preservative in vaccinations is to blame of autism, however, I don’t know the details. If the blood work shows heavy metals, chelation treatment may help. My wife and I suffered some heavy metal poisoning and we recovered through careful diet planning.

To learn more, check out a book from your library by one of the following authors: Dr. Neal Barnard, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., Dr. Dean Ornish, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, and Dr. John McDougall.

I personally avoid all dairy products and bread products. Avoiding genetically modified ingredients is critical. Prior to this diet, I was one meal away from heart attack. Now, I’m measurably healthier than I was when I was a teenager. My blood work is perfect.

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Question?: Autistic Disorder

Joseph asks…

How can I help my son who was diagnosed with mild autism?

My son is 3 and a half & was recently diagnosed with mild autism. Developmentally is a year behind in his speech & comprehension development. He still has difficulty answering “yes & no” questions & obviously he talks like a child who is just learning to talk. His answers & comments seem as if they are robotic & that he is not really thinking about what he is saying. It is a few months before his next doctors appointment & I know he will start various types of therapy. My question is what can I do in the meantime to help him with his language & communication skills? I have flash cards, & am aware of the “obvious” things you typically do to teach children. But I feel that I need some fresh ideas, because he doesn’t learn like other children due to his autistic disorder.

admin answers:

Hi:-) I have 2 HFA children. 6 and 4 years of age. Until you get therapy which I know can take forever to get…. You have to require language of him. In other words if you know he knows how to ask for something or if he knows the word for something you need not give in for 1/2 language. Require him to tell you if he knows. No matter what kind of fit you might get. Autistic children can be very resistant to change. The flash cards are great! I would sit with my children and when they were learning basic language and we would do flash cards. Try to be flexible in your approach. If he wants to put the correct ones in a box let him. Or if he wants to hold them let him. Make sure he gets a tangible reward for his cooperation. Also make sure some of the cards he knows to avoid frustration. Talk to him all the time about what things are and what they do even if you do not think he is listening. Take him to open places and pick flowers and tell him what they are. Appeal to his curiosity. There is alot you can do. Be creative. I hope this helps. I have been down this road twice. And still traveling.

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