Tag Archives: Autistic Child

Question?: Adhd Test

Ken asks…

How can you tell if an autistic child is also ADHD?

I have an 8 yr old son who is autistic and ADHD also runs in my family. Basically it seems ADHD and some form of the autism spectrum does as my nieces and nephew had one or both and my daughter is ADHD with testing for aspergers goin on. How can I get my son tested for adhd since he is non-communicative?

admin answers:

ADHD is commonly misdiagnosed with people that have Asperger’s Syndrome. The theory isn’t the change of mind but the fact that an obsessive mind causes them to move onto other subjects. One thing will cause another thought and so forth. This is not ADHD but doctors are more interested in prescribing Ritalin since this is an income stream for them. I would tell your school and they can test him or I would call a psychologist that specializes in Autism Spectrum Disorders and they will diagnose.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Children

Thomas asks…

What are the chances of us having an autistic child?

My husband’s niece has Asperger Syndrome. Are the chances higher than average for us to have a baby with AS or autism?

admin answers:

There are a few different spectrums of Autism and ASperger syndrome is one of them,it is less severe and usually occurs in females..Autism is becoming more frequent yet doctors and scientists truly dont know what the cause is but they do believe it may be genetic,and since it usually isnt diagnosed until the ages between 2 and 4,it would be highly unlikely to detect beforehand if you and your husbands child will develop it..still yet,you and your husband should see a genetic counselor and have tests run before getting pregnant to rule out any other possible genetic abnormalities…the good news though,is that even with Autism reaching its all time high,the treatments are getting better and with more success…hope this helped! Good luck…

For more info visit
http://health.yahoo.com/nervous-overview/autism-topic-overview/healthwise–hw152186.html

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Question?: Autism Signs In Infants

Ken asks…

Around what age is autism typically diagnosed?

Can it really be recognized in infants? If so, does the margin for misdiagnosis go up significantly in children so young? Will an autistic child always show signs so early or is it easy to miss until they are well into toddlerhood?
Alexandra – I’m just curious, I’m not concerned about Ari or anything…she *did* make me think of it because she has been engaging in some obsessive behavior lately…she’ll discover something new and do it over and over and over again, but I’m pretty sure that’s normal. It just made me wonder how you determine what’s “normal” and what isn’t when it comes to really young children/babies…their behavior is so all over the place, it just seems to me that it would be nearly impossible to diagnosis behavior abnormalities in children her age and younger.

admin answers:

I have a friend who’s son is the same age as mine (18 months). She’s mentioned in the past her fear that her son has ADHD or Autism. Her son’s first Aunt has autism, not sure what spectrum but she functions at the level of a baby, literally, and she’s a grown woman. She doesn’t talk and can’t be left alone and must be fully cared for.

Me, trying to be a comforting and good friend instantly dismissed her fears and worries. Told her these things could be normal, he’s fine, don’t worry, some kids are just different. And I honestly believed so at the time. I thought she was being a worried mom and I personally never noticed anything especially off about her son. Until I got to spend more and more time with her son and she pointed things out to me and I looked up some info. He does thinks like when he’s excited he makes this strange noise and flaps his arms and slaps his own face over and over and over. He’s delayed verbally and I felt it could be normal and he was just taking his time. All kids develop differently. But the few words he does know he only mimics the words, he does not actually seem to know what they mean, he just says them to say them or when she asks him to. I often feel terrible for her because her child is the most difficult child I’ve ever seen, and she does such a good job at keeping her cool. He has zero attention span and is always on the go, running here and there and then he throws a tantrum when she tries to settle him. But he does not move or be active with a purpose, he just runs around for the sake of moving. And he is always throwing a fit about something but never seems to have the ability to tell her and does not even try to gesture or point or anything. I’ve never in my life seen a child that threw more fits and especially over nothing than her son. I feel really bad for her sometimes and often feel like she should get a reward for how well she copes.

Anyway, I have started to see what she’s talking about when she said she’s worried. And am feeling bad for being so dismissive of her worries when she brought them up to me. And now I don’t know how to tell her I think she has a reason to worry and if he were my son I’ve have him evaluated or keep a close eye on him. I don’t know how to bring it back up, or say “maybe you were right and need to have him checked”. I mean how does one do that to a friend, and worry her even more?

My son does some things and I just think “oh, how very odd and strange”. He even does a few things that would be on the “signs for autism”. Like he sorts and stacks things and loves having things in their proper place and he is very particular and will focus on one thing for quite some time. The other day we were at the park with my friend and her son… There her son was running around like a madman and my son was in the same place for nearly 45 minutes sorting bark in the outdoor play kitchen on the playground. I thought “how strange, he’s on a playground with so many things to climb on and here he stands sorting bark and rocks, how odd”. But that’s the only “sign” he shows and I do not feel he has Autism or feel I have any reason to worry. He’s social, friendly, has age appropriate development and skills and seems to be a normal child to me.

As mothers we worry and are always on the look out for “what ifs”. But we also need to go with what our gut tells us! My gut tells me my son is fine and perfectly healthy. If my gut was telling me “something is very wrong”, I would have him evaluated or at least bring it up to the ped.

As far as an age, I’ve heard of kids not being diagnosed till they were already as old as teens. But the youngest kid I’ve ever heard of being diagnosed was 20 months. But he was extremely delayed and showed all the obvious signs, he even walked on his tip toes. So I feel for some kids it is possible to diagnose it early on, but others may not show any real signs until much later.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Ken asks…

what are difference between autism, Asperger’s syndrome, and Rett syndrome.?

please list similarities and differences, thank you

admin answers:

I have been diangnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome.It’s a type of high functioning autisim.Here is some information I have found on all three conditions.

Autism
Autism is classified as a neurodevelopmental disorder that manifests itself in markedly abnormal social interaction, communication ability, patterns of interests, and patterns of behavior.
Although the specific etiology of autism is unknown, many researchers suspect that autism results from genetically mediated vulnerabilities to environmental triggers. And while there is disagreement about the magnitude, nature, and mechanisms for such environmental factors, researchers have found at least seven major genes prevalent among individuals diagnosed as autistic. Some estimate that autism occurs in as many as one United States child in 166, however the National Institute of Mental Health gives a more conservative estimate of one in 1000[1]. For families that already have one autistic child, the odds of a second autistic child may be as high as one in twenty. Although autism is about 3 to 4 times more common in boys, girls with the disorder tend to have more severe symptoms and greater cognitive impairment. Diagnosis is based on a list of psychiatric criteria, and a series of standardized clinical tests may also be used.
Autism may not be physiologically obvious. A complete physical and neurological evaluation will typically be part of diagnosing autism. Some now speculate that autism is not a single condition but a group of several distinct conditions that manifest in similar ways.
By definition, autism must manifest delays in “social interaction, language as used in social communication, or symbolic or imaginative play,” with “onset prior to age 3 years”, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The ICD-10 also says that symptoms must “manifest before the age of three years.” There have been large increases in the reported incidence of autism, for reasons that are heavily debated by researchers in psychology and related fields within the scientific community.
Some children with autism have improved their social and other skills to the point where they can fully participate in mainstream education and social events, but there are lingering concerns that an absolute cure from autism is impossible with current technology. However, many autistic children and adults who are able to communicate (at least in writing) are opposed to attempts to cure their conditions, and see such conditions as part of who they are.
There is a great diversity in the skills and behaviors of individuals diagnosed as autistic, and physicians will often arrive at different conclusions about the appropriate diagnosis. Much of this is due to the sensory system of autistics, which is quite different from the sensory system of other people, since certain stimulations can affect an autist differently than a non-autist, and the degree to which the sensory system is affected varies wildly from one autistic person to another.
Nevertheless, professionals within pediatric care and development often look for early indicators of autism in order to initiate treatment as early as possible. However, some people do not believe in treatment for autism, either because they do not believe autism is a disorder or because they believe treatment can do more harm than good.
Social development
Typically, developing infants are social beings—early in life they do such things as gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. In contrast, most autistic children prefer objects to faces and seem to have tremendous difficulty learning to engage in the give-and-take of everyday human interaction. Even in the first few months of life, many seem indifferent to other people because they avoid eye contact and do not interact with them as often as non-autistic children.
Children with autism often appear to prefer being alone to the company of others and may passively accept such things as hugs and cuddling without reciprocating, or resist attention altogether. Later, they seldom seek comfort from others or respond to parents’ displays of anger or affection in a typical way. Research has suggested that although autistic children are attached to their parents, their expression of this attachment is unusual and difficult to interpret. Parents who looked forward to the joys of cuddling, teaching, and playing with their child may feel crushed by this lack of expected attachment behavior.
Children with autism often also appear to lack “theory of mind”, the ability to see things from another person’s perspective, a behavior cited as exclusive to human beings above the age of five and, possibly, other higher primates such as adult gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos. Typical 5-year-olds can develop insights into other people’s different knowledge, feelings, and intentions, interpretations based upon social cues (e.g., gestures, facial expressions). An individual with autism seems to lack these interpretation skills, an inability that leaves them unable to predict or understand other people’s actions. The social alienation of autistic and Asperger’s people can be so intense from childhood that many of them have imaginary friends as companionship. However, having an imaginary friend is not necessarily a sign of autism and also occurs in non-autistic children.
Although not universal, it is common for autistic people to not be able to regulate their behavior. This can take the form of crying or verbal outbursts that may seem out of proportion to the situation or self-injurious behaviours. Individuals with autism generally prefer consistent routines and environments; they may react negatively to changes in them. It is not uncommon for these individuals to exhibit aggression, increased levels of self-stimulatory behavior, self-injury or extensive withdrawal in overwhelming situations.
Sensory system
A key indicator to clinicians making a proper assessment for autism would include looking for symptoms much like those found in sensory integration dysfunction. Children will exhibit problems coping with the normal sensory input. Indicators of this disorder include oversensitivity or underreactivity to touch, movement, sights, or sounds; physical clumsiness or carelessness; poor body awareness; a tendency to be easily distracted; impulsive physical or verbal behavior; an activity level that is unusually high or low; not unwinding or calming oneself; difficulty learning new movements; difficulty in making transitions from one situation to another; social and/or emotional problems; delays in speech, language or motor skills; specific learning difficulties/delays in academic achievement.
One common example is an individual with autism hearing. A person with autism may have trouble hearing certain people while other people are louder than usual. Or the person with autism may be unable to filter out sounds in certain situations, such as in a large crowd of people (see cocktail party effect). However, this is perhaps the part of the autism that tends to vary the most from person to person, so these examples may not apply to every autistic.
Communication difficulties
By age 3, typical children have passed predictable language learning milestones; one of the earliest is babbling. By the first birthday, a typical toddler says words, turns when he or she hears his or her name, points when he or she wants a toy, and when offered something distasteful, makes it clear that the answer is “no.” Speech development in people with autism takes different paths. Some remain mute throughout their lives with varying degrees of literacy; communication in other ways—images, visual clues, sign language, and typing may be far more natural to them. Some infants who later show signs of autism coo and babble during the first few months of life, but stop soon afterwards. Others may be delayed, developing language as late as the teenage years. Still, inability to speak does not mean that people with autism are unintelligent or unaware. Once given appropriate accommodations, many will happily converse for hours, and can often be found in online chat rooms, discussion boards or websites and even using communication devices at autism-community social events such as Autreat.
Those who do speak often use language in unusual ways, retaining features of earlier stages of language development for long periods or throughout their lives. Some speak only single words, while others repeat the same phrase over and over. Some repeat what they hear, a condition called echolalia. Sing-song repetitions in particular are a calming, joyous activity that many autistic adults engage in. Many people with autism have a strong tonal sense, and can often understand spoken language. Some children may exhibit only slight delays in language, or even seem to have precocious language and unusually large vocabularies, but have great difficulty in sustaining typical conversations. The “give and take” of non-autistic conversation is hard for them, although they often carry on a monologue on a favorite subject, giving no one else an opportunity to comment. When given the chance to converse with other autistics, they comfortably do so in “parallel monologue”—taking turns expressing views and information. Just as “neurotypicals” (people without autism) have trouble understanding autistic body languages, vocal tones, or phraseology, people with autism similarly have trouble with such things in people without autism. In particular, autistic language abilities tend to be highly literal; people without autism often inappropriately attribute hidden meaning to what people with autism say or expect the person with autism to sense such unstated meaning in their own words.
The body language of people with autism can be difficult for other people to understand. Facial expressions, movements, and gestures may be easily understood by some other people with autism, but do not match those used by other people. Also, their tone of voice has a much more subtle inflection in reflecting their feelings, and the auditory system of a person without autism often cannot sense the fluctuations. What seems to non-autistic people like a high-pitched, sing-song, or flat, robot-like voice is common in autistic children. Some autistic children with relatively good language skills speak like little adults, rather than communicating at their current age level, which is one of the things that can lead to problems.
Since non-autistic people are often unfamiliar with the autistic body language, and since autistic natural language may not tend towards speech, autistic people often struggle to let other people know what they need. As anybody might do in such a situation, they may scream in frustration or resort to grabbing what they want. While waiting for non-autistic people to learn to communicate with them, people with autism do whatever they can to get through to them. Communication difficulties may contribute to autistic people becoming socially anxious or depressed.
Repetitive behaviors
Although people with autism usually appear physically normal and have good muscle control, unusual repetitive motions, known as self-stimulation or “stimming,” may set them apart. These behaviors might be extreme and highly apparent or more subtle. Some children and older individuals spend a lot of time repeatedly flapping their arms or wiggling their toes, others suddenly freeze in position. As children, they might spend hours lining up their cars and trains in a certain way, not using them for pretend play. If someone accidentally moves one of these toys, the child may be tremendously upset. Autistic children often need, and demand, absolute consistency in their environment. A slight change in any routine—in mealtimes, dressing, taking a bath, or going to school at a certain time and by the same route—can be extremely disturbing. People with autism sometimes have a persistent, intense preoccupation. For example, the child might be obsessed with learning all about vacuum cleaners, train schedules or lighthouses. Often they show great interest in different languages, numbers, symbols or science topics. Repetitive behaviors can also extend into the spoken word as well. Perseveration of a single word or phrase, even for a specific number of times can also become a part of the child’s daily routine.
Effects in education
Children with autism are affected with these symptoms every day. These unusual characteristics set them apart from the everyday normal student. Because they have trouble understanding people’s thoughts and feelings, they have trouble understanding what their teacher may be telling them. They do not understand that facial expressions and vocal variations hold meanings and may misinterpret what emotion their instructor is displaying. This inability to fully decipher the world around them makes education stressful. Teachers need to be aware of a student’s disorder so that they are able to help the student get the best out of the lessons being taught.
Some students learn better with visual aids as they are better able to understand material presented this way. Because of this, many teachers create “visual schedules” for their autistic students. This allows the student to know what is going on throughout the day, so they know what to prepare for and what activity they will be doing next. Some autistic children have trouble going from one activity to the next, so this visual schedule can help to reduce stress.
Research has shown that working in pairs may be beneficial to autistic children. Autistic students have problems in schools not only with language and communication, but with socialization as well. They feel self-conscious about themselves and many feel that they will always be outcasts. By allowing them to work with peers they can make friends, which in turn can help them cope with the problems that arise. By doing so they can become more integrated into the mainstream environment of the classroom.
A teacher’s aide can also be useful to the student. The aide is able to give more elaborate directions that the teacher may not have time to explain to the autistic child. The aide can also facilitate the autistic child in such a way as to allow them to stay at a similar level to the rest of the class. This allows a partially one-on-one lesson structure so that the child is still able to stay in a normal classroom but be given the extra help that they need.
There are many different techniques that teachers can use to assist their students. A teacher needs to become familiar with the child’s disorder to know what will work best with that particular child. Every child is going to be different and teachers have to be able to adjust with every one of them.
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders typically have high levels of anxiety and stress, particularly in social environments like school. If a student exhibits aggressive or explosive behavior, it is important for educational teams to recognize the impact of stress and anxiety. Preparing students for new situations by writing Social Stories can lower anxiety. Teaching social and emotional concepts using systematic teaching approaches such as The Incredible 5-Point Scale or other Cognitive Behavioral strategies can increase a student’s ability to control excessive behavioral reactions.
There is a great diversity in the skills and behaviors of individuals diagnosed as autistic, and physicians will often arrive at different conclusions about the appropriate diagnosis. Much of this is due to the sensory system of autistics, which is quite different from the sensory system of other people, since certain stimulations can affect an autist differently than a non-autist, and the degree to which the sensory system is affected varies wildly from one autistic person to another.
Nevertheless, professionals within pediatric care and development often look for early indicators of autism in order to initiate treatment as early as possible. However, some people do not believe in treatment for autism, either because they do not believe autism is a disorder or because they believe treatment can do more harm than good.
Social development
Typically, developing infants are social beings—early in life they do such things as gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. In contrast, most autistic children prefer objects to faces and seem to have tremendous difficulty learning to engage in the give-and-take of everyday human interaction. Even in the first few months of life, many seem indifferent to other people because they avoid eye contact and do not interact with them as often as non-autistic children.
Children with autism often appear to prefer being alone to the company of others and may passively accept such things as hugs and cuddling without reciprocating, or resist attention altogether. Later, they seldom seek comfort from others or respond to parents’ displays of anger or affection in a typical way. Research has suggested that although autistic children are attached to their parents, their expression of this attachment is unusual and difficult to interpret. Parents who looked forward to the joys of cuddling, teaching, and playing with their child may feel crushed by this lack of expected attachment behavior.
Children with autism often also appear to lack “theory of mind”, the ability to see things from another person’s perspective, a behavior cited as exclusive to human beings above the age of five and, possibly, other higher primates such as adult gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos. Typical 5-year-olds can develop insights into other people’s different knowledge, feelings, and intentions, interpretations based upon social cues (e.g., gestures, facial expressions). An individual with autism seems to lack these interpretation skills, an inability that leaves them unable to predict or understand other people’s actions. The social alienation of autistic and Asperger’s people can be so intense from childhood that many of them have imaginary friends as companionship. However, having an imaginary friend is not necessarily a sign of autism and also occurs in non-autistic children.
Although not universal, it is common for autistic people to not be able to regulate their behavior. This can take the form of crying or verbal outbursts that may seem out of proportion to the situation or self-injurious behaviours. Individuals with autism generally prefer consistent routines and environments; they may react negatively to changes in them. It is not uncommon for these individuals to exhibit aggression, increased levels of self-stimulatory behavior, self-injury or extensive withdrawal in overwhelming situations.
Sensory system
A key indicator to clinicians making a proper assessment for autism would include looking for symptoms much like those found in sensory integration dysfunction. Children will exhibit problems coping with the normal sensory input. Indicators of this disorder include oversensitivity or underreactivity to touch, movement, sights, or sounds; physical clumsiness or carelessness; poor body awareness; a tendency to be easily distracted; impulsive physical or verbal behavior; an activity level that is unusually high or low; not unwinding or calming oneself; difficulty learning new movements; difficulty in making transitions from one situation to another; social and/or emotional problems; delays in speech, language or motor skills; specific learning difficulties/delays in academic achievement.
One common example is an individual with autism hearing. A person with autism may have trouble hearing certain people while other people are louder than usual. Or the person with autism may be unable to filter out sounds in certain situations, such as in a large crowd of people (see cocktail party effect). However, this is perhaps the part of the autism that tends to vary the most from person to person, so these examples may not apply to every autistic.
Communication difficulties
By age 3, typical children have passed predictable language learning milestones; one of the earliest is babbling. By the first birthday, a typical toddler says words, turns when he or she hears his or her name, points when he or she wants a toy, and when offered something distasteful, makes it clear that the answer is “no.” Speech development in people with autism takes different paths. Some remain mute throughout their lives with varying degrees of literacy; communication in other ways—images, visual clues, sign language, and typing may be far more natural to them. Some infants who later show signs of autism coo and babble during the first few months of life, but stop soon afterwards. Others may be delayed, developing language as late as the teenage years. Still, inability to speak does not mean that people with autism are unintelligent or unaware. Once given appropriate accommodations, many will happily converse for hours, and can often be found in online chat rooms, discussion boards or websites and even using communication devices at autism-community social events such as Autreat.
Those who do speak often use language in unusual ways, retaining features of earlier stages of language development for long periods or throughout their lives. Some speak only single words, while others repeat the same phrase over and over. Some repeat what they hear, a condition called echolalia. Sing-song repetitions in particular are a calming, joyous activity that many autistic adults engage in. Many people with autism have a strong tonal sense, and can often understand spoken language. Some children may exhibit only slight delays in language, or even seem to have precocious language and unusually large vocabularies, but have great difficulty in sustaining typical conversations. The “give and take” of non-autistic conversation is hard for them, although they often carry on a monologue on a favorite subject, giving no one else an opportunity to comment. When given the chance to converse with other autistics, they comfortably do so in “parallel monologue”—taking turns expressing views and information. Just as “neurotypicals” (people without autism) have trouble understanding autistic body languages, vocal tones, or phraseology, people with autism similarly have trouble with such things in people without autism. In particular, autistic language abilities tend to be highly literal; people without autism often inappropriately attribute hidden meaning to what people with autism say or expect the person with autism to sense such unstated meaning in their own words.
The body language of people with autism can be difficult for other people to understand. Facial expressions, movements, and gestures may be easily understood by some other people with autism, but do not match those used by other people. Also, their tone of voice has a much more subtle inflection in reflecting their feelings, and the auditory system of a person without autism often cannot sense the fluctuations. What seems to non-autistic people like a high-pitched, sing-song, or flat, robot-like voice is common in autistic children. Some autistic children with relatively good language skills speak like little adults, rather than communicating at their current age level, which is one of the things that can lead to problems.
Since non-autistic people are often unfamiliar with the autistic body language, and since autistic natural language may not tend towards speech, autistic people often struggle to let other people know what they need. As anybody might do in such a situation, they may scream in frustration or resort to grabbing what they want. While waiting for non-autistic people to learn to communicate with them, people with autism do whatever they can to get through to them. Communication difficulties may contribute to autistic people becoming socially anxious or depressed.
Repetitive behaviors
Although people with autism usually appear physically normal and have good muscle control, unusual repetitive motions, known as self-stimulation or “stimming,” may set them apart. These behaviors might be extreme and highly apparent or more subtle. Some children and older individuals spend a lot of time repeatedly flapping their arms or wiggling their toes, others suddenly freeze in position. As children, they might spend hours lining up their cars and trains in a certain way, not using them for pretend play. If someone accidentally moves one of these toys, the child may be tremendously upset. Autistic children often need, and demand, absolute consistency in their environment. A slight change in any routine—in mealtimes, dressing, taking a bath, or going to school at a certain time and by the same route—can be extremely disturbing. People with autism sometimes have a persistent, intense preoccupation. For example, the child might be obsessed with learning all about vacuum cleaners, train schedules or lighthouses. Often they show great interest in different languages, numbers, symbols or science topics. Repetitive behaviors can also extend into the spoken word as well. Perseveration of a single word or phrase, even for a specific number of times can also become a part of the child’s daily routine.
Effects in education
Children with autism are affected with these symptoms every day. These unusual characteristics set them apart from the everyday normal student. Because they have trouble understanding people’s thoughts and feelings, they have trouble understanding what their teacher may be telling them. They do not understand that facial expressions and vocal variations hold meanings and may misinterpret what emotion their instructor is displaying. This inability to fully decipher the world around them makes education stressful. Teachers need to be aware of a student’s disorder so that they are able to help the student get the best out of the lessons being taught.
Some students learn better with visual aids as they are better able to understand material presented this way. Because of this, many teachers create “visual schedules” for their autistic students. This allows the student to know what is going on throughout the day, so they know what to prepare for and what activity they will be doing next. Some autistic children have trouble going from one activity to the next, so this visual schedule can help to reduce stress.
Research has shown that working in pairs may be beneficial to autistic children. Autistic students have problems in schools not only with language and communication, but with socialization as well. They feel self-conscious about themselves and many feel that they will always be outcasts. By allowing them to work with peers they can make friends, which in turn can help them cope with the problems that arise. By doing so they can become more integrated into the mainstream environment of the classroom.
A teacher’s aide can also be useful to the student. The aide is able to give more elaborate directions that the teacher may not have time to explain to the autistic child. The aide can also facilitate the autistic child in such a way as to allow them to stay at a similar level to the rest of the class. This allows a partially one-on-one lesson structure so that the child is still able to stay in a normal classroom but be given the extra help that they need.
There are many different techniques that teachers can use to assist their students. A teacher needs to become familiar with the child’s disorder to know what will work best with that particular child. Every child is going to be different and teachers have to be able to adjust with every one of them.
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders typically have high levels of anxiety and stress, particularly in social environments like school. If a student exhibits aggressive or explosive behavior, it is important for educational teams to recognize the impact of stress and anxiety. Preparing students for new situations by writing Social Stories can lower anxiety. Teaching social and emotional concepts using systematic teaching approaches such as The Incredible 5-Point Scale or other Cognitive Behavioral strategies can increase a student’s ability to control excessive behavioral reactions.
Asperger’s Syndrome
Asperger syndrome (sometimes called Asperger’s syndrome, AS, or the more common shorthand Asperger’s), is characterized as one of the five pervasive developmental disorders, and is commonly referred to as a form of high-functioning autism. In very broad terms, individuals with Asperger’s have normal or above average intellectual capacity, and atypical or poorly developed social skills, often with emotional/social development or integration happening later than usual as a result.
Like other conditions classified as autism spectrum disorders, Asperger syndrome appears to be more prevalent among males than females, with males making up approximately 75–80 percent of diagnoses. Many clinicians believe that this may not reflect the actual incidence among females; well-known Asperger syndrome expert Tony Attwood suggests that females learn to better compensate for their impairments because of differences in socialization (Attwood, pp 151–2). Some preliminary evidence for this is found in the Ehlers & Gillberg study, which found a 4:1 male to female ratio in the people they thought definitely had Asperger’s but a much less lopsided 2.3 to 1 ratio when merely suspected or otherwise borderline cases were included.
The overwhelming majority of available information on Asperger syndrome relates to children; there is currently more conjecture than hard evidence on how it affects adults. It is thought that most people with Asperger syndrome learn to cope with their social impairments later in life. However, there is no “cure” as such, and some people, including prominent clinicians such as Attwood and some of those diagnosed with Asperger’s, would strenuously argue that a cure is neither possible nor desirable (see “A gift and a curse” and “Culture” below), mainly pointing out that the syndrome is a hereditary trait and attempts to “cure” or eliminate it would be an example of eugenics. Organizations such as Cure Autism Now disagree; this remains a highly controversial area.
The most common and important characteristics of Asperger syndrome can be divided into several broad categories: social impairments, narrow but intense interests, and speech and language peculiarities. Other features are commonly associated with this syndrome but not always held to be necessary for diagnosis. This section reflects mainly Attwood, Gillberg, and Wing’s thinking on the most important characteristics of Asperger; the DSM-IV criteria (see below) represent a slightly different view.
Social impairments
Although there is no single feature that all people with Asperger syndrome share, difficulties with social behavior are nearly universal and are perhaps the most important criteria that define the condition. People with Asperger syndrome lack the natural ability to see the subtexts of social interaction (sometimes resulting in well-meaning remarks that may offend and so on, finding it hard to know what is “acceptable”) and also tend to lack the ability to broadcast their own emotional state.
Non-autistics, often colloquially called neurotypicals, are able to gather a host of information about other people’s cognitive and emotional states based on clues gleaned from the environment and the other person’s facial expression and body language, but people with Asperger syndrome have an impairment in this ability, sometimes called mind-blindness. To be mind-blind is to find it difficult or even impossible to figure out things a person implies but does not say directly (more colloquially, to “read between the lines”). This is not because they cannot imagine the answer but because they cannot choose between the possibilities; the mind-blind person cannot reliably gather enough information to do so or does not know how to interpret the information that they do gather.
Along with this difficulty in reading the nonverbal communication of others, most people with Asperger’s have difficulty expressing their own emotional state via body language, facial expression, and nuances as most people do. Some such people have emotional responses as strong as, or perhaps stronger than, those of most people, although what generates an emotional response might not always be the same; the difficulty is in expressing these feelings, although it sometimes comes across as lacking them. And some such people do truly lack, or have reduced levels of emotions. For example, many people with Asperger syndrome have difficulty with eye contact. Some make very little eye contact because they find it overwhelming, whereas others have unmodulated, staring eye contact that can cause discomfort to other people. Similarly, the use of gestures may be almost nonexistent or may seem exaggerated and differ from what would normally be considered appropriate for a situation.
It is worth noting that because it is classified as a spectrum disorder, some people with Asperger syndrome are nearly normal in their ability to read and use facial expressions and other subtle forms of communication. However, this ability does not come naturally to most people with Asperger syndrome. Such people must learn social skills intellectually, delaying social development.
Some people feel that much of the social difficulties in Asperger Syndrome are more accurately characterized as “mutual misunderstanding”, in that neither the “aspie” nor the neurotypical understands each other. Some autistics assert that they have a much easier time reading body language of other autistic people, and that neurotypicals have difficulties interpreting autistic body language. Comparing the nonverbal communication problems that often occur between people from different cultures is a common defense given for this theory.
Narrow, intense interests
Asperger syndrome can involve an intense and obsessive level of focus on things of interest. For example, one person might be obsessed with 1950s professional wrestling, another with national anthems of African dictatorships, or another with building models out of matchsticks. Particularly common interests are means of transport (such as trains), computers, maths (particularly specific aspects, such as pi), astronomy, geography, and dinosaurs. Note that all of these last items are normal interests in ordinary children; the difference in Asperger children is the unusual intensity of their interest.
Sometimes these interests are lifelong; in other cases, they change at unpredictable intervals. In either case, there are normally one or two at any given time. In pursuit of these interests, the person with Asperger’s often manifests extremely sophisticated reason, an almost obsessive focus, and great memory for apparently trivial facts (occasionally even eidetic memory). Hans Asperger called his young patients “little professors” because he thought his thirteen-year-old patients had as comprehensive and nuanced an understanding of their field of interest as university professors.
Some clinicians would not entirely agree with this description; for example, Wing and Gillberg both argue that there is often more rote memorization than real understanding of these areas of interest, despite occasional appearances to the contrary. However, such a limitation is not required for diagnosis, even under Gillberg’s criteria.
Children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome often have little patience for things outside these areas of interest. During the school years, many are perceived as highly intelligent underachievers or overachievers, clearly capable of outperforming their peers in their field of interest yet persistently unmotivated to do regular homework assignments (sometimes even in their areas of interest). Others, in contrast, may be hypermotivated to outperform peers in school. This adds to the difficulties of diagnosing the syndrome. In more serious cases, the combination of social problems and intense interests can lead to unusual behavior, such as greeting a stranger by launching into a lengthy monologue about a special interest rather than introducing oneself in the socially-accepted way. However, in many cases adults can outgrow this impatience and lack of motivation and develop more tolerance to new activities and meeting new people.
Speech and language peculiarities
People with Asperger syndrome often are noted for having a highly pedantic way of speaking, using language far more formal and structured than the situation normally would be thought to call for. A five-year-old child with this condition may regularly speak in language that could easily have come from a university textbook, especially on his or her special area of interest.
Literal interpretation is another common but not universal hallmark of this condition. Attwood gives the example of a girl with Asperger syndrome who answered the telephone one day and was asked “Is Paul there?”. Although the Paul in question was in the house, he was not in the room with her, so after looking around to ascertain this, she simply said “no” and hung up. The person on the other end had to call back and explain to her that he meant for her to find him and get him to pick up the telephone (Attwood 78).
Many people with Asperger syndrome also make idiosyncratic use of words, including new coinages and unusual juxtapositions. This can develop into a rare gift for humor (especially puns, wordplay, doggerel, satire) or writing. Another potential source of humor is the eventual realization that their literal interpretations can be used to amuse others. Some are so proficient with written language as to qualify as hyperlexic. Tony Attwood refers to a particular child’s skill at inventing expressions, e.g. “tidying down” (the opposite of tidying up) or “broken” (when referring to a baby brother who cannot walk or talk) (Attwood, 82).
Other characteristics
Those affected by Asperger’s may also manifest a range of other sensory, developmental, and physiological anomalies. Children with Asperger’s may evidence a delay in the development of fine motor skills. In some cases (although with many exceptions) people with AS may have an odd way of walking, or display compulsive finger, hand, or arm movements.
In general, orderly things appeal to people with Asperger’s. Some researchers mention the imposition of rigid routines (on self or others) as a criterion for diagnosing this condition. It appears that changes to their routines cause inordinate levels of anxiety for some people with this condition (Attwood 100).
Some people with Asperger’s experience varying degrees of sensory overload and are extremely sensitive to touch, smells, sounds, tastes, and sights. They may prefer soft clothing, familiar scents, or certain foods. Some may even be pathologically sensitive to loud noises or strong smells or dislike being touched; for example, certain children with Asperger’s exhibit a strong dislike of having their head touched or their hair disturbed. Sensory overload may exacerbate problems faced by such children at school, where levels of noise in the classroom can become intolerable for them. Some are also unable to block out certain repetitive stimuli, such as the constant ticking of a clock. Whereas most children stop registering this sound after a short time and can hear it only if they consciously listen for it, the child with Asperger’s can become distracted, agitated, or even (in rare cases) violent if the sound is not removed.
Additionally, people with Asperger’s exhibiting severe symptoms may frequently be diagnosed with clinical depression, Oppositional defiant disorder, ADHD, General anxiety disorder, Bipolar disorder, Obsessive compulsive disorder, or Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. However, while elements from all of these conditions are associated with Asperger syndrome, the cause is usually Asperger’s itself and not a separate condition. While there may be a correlation between them, the disorders are in fact distinct from one another. There is research which indicates people with Asperger’s may in fact be far more likely to have the associated conditions, but for now the connection is largely one of resemblance.
Asperger syndrome usually leads to problems in social interaction with peers. These can be severe, especially in childhood and adolescence; children with Asperger syndrome often are the target of teasing and bullying at school because of their idiosyncratic behavior, language, interests, and their lowered or delayed ability to perceive and respond in socially expected ways to nonverbal cues, particularly in interpersonal conflict. A child or teen with Asperger syndrome often is puzzled as to the source of this mistreatment, unaware of what has been done “wrong.” Those who are aware of their condition may come to recognize such errors, but almost never immediately upon making them. The social alienation of children with Asperger syndrome can be so intense that they create imaginary friends for companionship (although this is certainly not specific to Asperger syndrome, since non-autistics may do the same). Even later in life, many people with Asperger’s report a feeling of being unwillingly detached from the world around them.
Bullying and other reasons were cited as a cause for William Freund’s rampage in October 2005.
One example of this sort of bullying: non-Autistic students will pretend to befriend those with Asperger’s syndrome by using sarcasm and intense use of “sexual phrases” which many children with Asperger’s syndrome may not recognize as such. The Asperger’s child is unaware he is being bullied and believes he has a true friend, while the “normal” child and his friends are laughing at him.
Children with Asperger syndrome often display advanced abilities for their age in language, reading, mathematics, spatial skills, and/or music, sometimes into the “gifted” range, but this may be counterbalanced by appreciable delays in other developmental areas. This combination of traits can create problems with teachers and other authority figures. (It may be relevant here that one of the social conventions many people with Asperger’s syndrome ignore is respect for authority. Attwood notes a tendency to feel that everyone should be treated much the same regardless of what social position they occupy; the student with Asperger’s syndrome may not give respect to an authority figure until he or she feels it has been earned, an attitude many teachers either do not understand or take strong exception to.) Like many other gifted children, a child with Asperger’s might be regarded by teachers as a “problem child” or a “poor performer.” The child’s extremely low tolerance for what they perceive to be mundane and mediocre tasks (such as typical homework assignments) can easily become frustrating; the teacher may well consider the child arrogant, spiteful, and insubordinate. Meanwhile, the child sits mutely, feeling frustrated and wronged and often having no idea how to express these feelings.
However, Asperger syndrome does not guarantee one will have a miserable life. The intense focus and tendency to work things out logically, a characteristic of Asperger syndrome, often grants people with the syndrome a high level of ability in their fields of interest. When these special interests coincide with a materially or socially useful task, the person with Asperger’s often can in fact lead a profitable life. The child obsessed with naval architecture may grow up to be an accomplished shipwright, for instance.
Although many people with Asperger’s are not considered socially successful by common standards – and there are many who remain alone their entire lives – it is certainly possible for them to find understanding people with whom they can have close relationships. Many autistics have children, in which case their children may or may not have an autism spectrum disorder. Also, many people with Asperger syndrome recognize that there is a problem and try to adapt to living among people without the syndrome, even if they are unaware of the term “Asperger syndrome” itself or believe it does not apply to them. It is possible with training and self-discipline for a child with Asperger’s to end up as an adult who, though still having Asperger’s, is able to interact well with others. However, because of their delayed social development, it is not unusual for people with Asperger’s to feel most comfortable with people much younger or older than they are.
However, not showing affection (or not doing so in conventional societally-acceptable ways) does not necessarily mean that he or she does not feel it. Understanding this can lead the significant other to feel less rejected and be more understanding. There are usually ways to work around the problems, such as being more explicit about one’s needs. For instance, when describing emotions, it can be helpful to be direct and to avoid vague terms such as “upset” when the emotion being described is anger (some individuals with Asperger’s would interpret “upset” as mere annoyance, or even nausea). It is often effective to lay out in clear language what the problem is and to ask the partner with Asperger’s to describe what emotions are being felt or ask why a certain emotion was being felt. It is very helpful if the family member or significant other reads as much as he or she can about Asperger’s syndrome and any comorbid disorders. In a minority of situations the opposite problem occurs; the person with Asperger’s is unusually affectionate to significant others and misses or misinterprets signals from the other partner, causing the partner to get annoyed and leave the person with Asperger syndrome feeling depressed and alone.
Experts generally agree that there is no single condition called autism. Rather, there is a spectrum of autistic conditions, with different forms of autism taking different positions on this spectrum. But in certain circles of the autism community, this concept of a spectrum is being questioned. If differences in development are purely a function of differences in skill acquisition, then attempting to distinguish between degrees of severity may be dangerously misleading. A person may be subjected to unrealistic expectations, or even denied life-saving services, based solely on very superficial observations made by others in the community.
In the 1940s, Leo Kanner and Hans Asperger, working independently in the United States and Austria, identified essentially the same population, although Asperger’s group was perhaps more “socially functional” than Kanner’s as a whole. Some of Kanner’s originally identified autistic children might today get an Asperger syndrome diagnosis, and vice versa. It is a mistake to say that a “Kanner autistic” is a child who sits and rocks and does not communicate. Kanner’s study subjects were all along the spectrum.
Traditionally, Kannerian autism is characterized by significant cognitive and communicative deficiencies, including delays in or lack of language. Often it is clear that these people do not function normally. On the other hand, a person with Asperger’s will not show delays in language. It is a more subtle condition, and affected people often appear only to be eccentric.
Researchers are grappling with the problem of how to divide the spectrum. There are many potential divisions, such as autistics who speak versus those who do not, autistics with seizures versus those without, autistics with more “stereotypical behaviors” versus those with fewer, and so forth. Some researchers are trying to identify genes associated with these traits as a way to make logical groupings. Eventually, one may hear autistics described as being with or without a specific gene, with or without changes to a certain chromosome, etc.
Leo Kanner identified another form of autism around the same time as Hans Asperger.
Some clinicians believe that communicative or cognitive deficiencies are so essential to the concept of autism that they prefer to consider Asperger’s a separate condition from autism. This opinion is a minority one. Uta Frith (an early researcher of Kannerian autism) has written that people with Asperger’s seem to have more than a touch of autism to them. Others, such as Lorna Wing and Tony Attwood, share in Frith’s assessment. Dr. Sally Ozonoff, of the University of California at Davis’s MIND institute, argues that there should be no dividing line between “high-functioning” autism and Asperger’s, and that the fact that some people do not start to produce speech until a later age is no reason to divide the two groups because they are identical in the way they need to be treated.
A gift and a curse
With the increase of Asperger syndrome diagnoses, its image continues to shift from that of a disease to a more complex view of a syndrome with both advantages and disadvantages because there are adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome or autism who have become quite successful in their fields, possibly as a direct result of intellectual gifts and above-average focus and motivation associated with the syndrome. For example, some prominent Asperger-diagnosed people include Nobel Prize-winning economist Vernon Smith, comedian/actor Dan Aykroyd, industrial rocker Gary Numan, Craig Nicholls, frontman of the band The Vines, as well as Satoshi Tajiri, the creator of Pokémon. BitTorrent inventor Bram Cohen is widely cited as having Asperger syndrome, although he appears to have made this conclusion without consulting a medical professional. [1][2]
Speculation about recognized people who may have Asperger syndrome
It has been speculated that Albert Einstein had what is now considered Asperger syndrome.
Recently, some researchers such as Simon Baron-Cohen and Ioan James have speculated that well-known figures of the past, such as Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton, had Asperger syndrome because they showed some Asperger’s-related tendencies or behaviors, such as intense interest in one subject, or social problems. A chapter of the aforementioned Gillberg book is devoted to this subject, including a detailed case study of philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein concluding that he met the criteria for the condition. However, such posthumous diagnoses remain controversial.
The specific arguments alleging that certain famous people might be on the autistic spectrum vary from person to person. Some claim that Albert Einstein (one of the more frequently cited figures of the past as possibly autistic) was a loner as a child, had violent temper tantrums, repeated under his breath sentences he uttered, and needed his wives to act as parents when he was an adult, factors that are stereotypical of autistic people. Isaac Newton stuttered and was epileptic. Many of these suspected historical Asperger cases might have been quite mild, but some skeptics believe these people may have had a few autistic traits but not enough for an autism spectrum diagnosis. Finally, many critics of historical diagnosis claim it is simply not possible to diagnose the dead, so nothing can be said definitively regarding the Asperger status of historical figures.
Such speculation may simply be an attempt to create role models for autistics to demonstrate that they can be exemplary contributors to society. Autistic rights activists often use such speculative diagnoses to argue that it would be a loss to society if autism were cured. However, others in the autistic rights movement dislike these arguments because they think autistics should be able to value their uniqueness without the desire for a cure, regardless of whether people such as Einstein were autistic.
Shift away from view as a disease
The speculated social contributions of autistic people have contributed to the shift in the perception of autism spectrum disorders as complex syndromes rather than diseases that must be cured. Proponents of this view reject the notion that there is an ‘ideal’ brain configuration and that any deviation from the norm must be considered pathological. They demand tolerance for what they call their neurodiversity in much the same way lesbian and gay people have demanded tolerance for theirs. Views such as these are the basis for the autistic rights and autistic pride movements.
A Wired magazine article called “The Geek Syndrome” suggested that Asperger syndrome is more common in the Silicon Valley, a haven for computer scientists and mathematicians. It created an enduring notion popularized in the media and self-help books that “Geek Syndrome” equals Asperger syndrome and caused an explosion of self-diagnoses in part because it was printed alongside Simon Baron-Cohen’s 50-question Autism Spectrum Quotient Test. Like some people with Asperger syndrome, geeks may exhibit an extreme professional or casual interest in computers, science, engineering, and related fields and may be introverted or prioritize work over other aspects of life. However, no determination has yet been made of whether the “Geek Syndrome” personality type has a direct relation to autism or is simply a “variant normal” type that is not part of the autistic spectrum.
Regardless, societal acceptance of Asperger or Asperger-like traits is still rare, as many people in the autistic spectrum will confirm.
Rett syndrome
Rett syndrome (Rett syndrome, Rett’s disorder) is a progressive neurological disorder. The symptoms of this disorder are easily confused with those of autism and cerebral palsy. The gene is recessive and can therefore lie dormant for generations. The clinical diagnosis specifies a small head and small hands and feet. Stereotypical repetitive hand movements such as mouthing or wringing are also included as diagnostic signs. Symptoms of the disease include learning disorders and a total inability to socialize. Girls with Rett syndrome are very prone to seizures and GI disorders. They typically have no verbal skills, and about 50% of females are ambulatory. Rett syndrome (symbolized RTT) is X-linked dominant, affecting almost exclusively girls. Development is normal until 1 year of age, when language and motor milestones regress and acquired microcephaly is seen. Hand wringing and sighing are characteristic, and they develop autistic behavior. Rett syndrome is usually caused by a mutation in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MECP2). MECP2 is found on chromosome band Xq28, near the long end of the X chromosome. Rett syndrome can also be caused by a mutation to the gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5). Rett syndrome affects 1 in every 12,500 female live births. Most individuals with Rett syndrome are female. One explanation given for this was that the genetic defect that caused Rett syndrome in females caused embryonic lethality in males (that is, males with pathogenic MECP2 mutations died before they were born). While a plausible hypothesis, more recent research has contradicted this explanation. Most males with a pathogenic MECP2 mutation suffer from neonatal encephalopathy and die within a year or so of birth. Males who have two X chromosomes and a Y chromosome (often called Klinefelter’s syndrome), one with a mutated MECP2 gene, follow a similar development path to females with Rett syndrome. Males who have somatic mosaicism also have symptoms like females with Rett syndrome. Infants with Rett syndrome typically develop normally until they are 6-18 months old. Physioneurological development tends to plateau after this brief period of normal development, and is followed by deterioration of the high brain functions. Psychomotor and cognitive abilities rapidly decline between 1-2 years of age. Symptoms that develop are similar to those of autism, including mental retardation and poor growth. It is, hence, easy to mistakenly diagnose Rett syndrome for autism, or cerebral palsy.
Symptoms of Rett syndrome that are similar to autism:
•screaming fits
•panic attacks
•inconsolable crying
•avoiding looking into other people’s eyes
•lack of social/emotional reciprocity
•general lack of interest
•marked impaired use of nonverbal behaviors to regulate social interaction
•delay of linguistic development
oloss of speech

Symptoms of Rett syndrome that are also present in cerebral palsy:
•short stature
•severe dementia
•mild learning disability
•hypotonia
•Delayed or absent ability to walk
•gait/movement difficulties
•ataxia
•microencephalopathy – abnormally small head, lack of head growth
•some forms of spasticity
owringing of hands
oChorea – spasmodic movements of hand or facial muscles
odystonia
obruxism – grinding of teeth

Symptoms may stabilize for up to a few decades before complications set in, such as epilepsy or seizure and spastic paraparesis (spasticity or paralysis of the lower limbs).
Depending on the severity of psychomotoral and cognitive impairment, 2-15% of patients may achieve a nonretarded level of functioning through various rehabilitation methods. Marriage, success in achieving employment and independent living can be achieved during adulthood. Currently there is no cure for Rett syndrome.
Males with pathogenic MECP2 mutations usually die during infancy stage from severe encephalopathy, unless they have an extra X chromosome (often described as Klinefelter’s syndrome), or have somatic mosaicism.
Females can live up to 40 years or more. Abnormal lab data values on Rett disorder may show:
•EEG abnormalities from 2 years of age
•atypical glycolipids
•elevated levels of beta-endorphins and glutamate
•reduction of substance P
•decreased levels of nerve growth factors
Mortality rate among children with Rett disorder is approximately at 1.2% per year.
High proportion of deaths are abrupt; due to:
•heart conduction problem – abnormally prolonged QT interval on ECG
•spontaneous brainstem dysfunction
•respiratory arrest

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Question?: Autistic

Donna asks…

What is glutathione pleolyposome? Is it safe to use for a four year old autistic child?

I have a four year old autistic boy. I have read about glutathione pleolyposome in couple of web sites and they claim to be very useful for someone with autism. Is there anyone who have used it and it helped the autistic condition? I would like to learn more about it. Thank you.

admin answers:

Glutathione is a tripeptide produced by the liver. Glutathione pleolyposome is man-made. This is hype to get you to purchase it. Don’t buy into it because you’re looking for a quick fix. I also have an autistic son but I don’t look to a charlatan’s snake oil for a cure. None of these websites is medically based and the so-called evidence they give for the causes of autism are specious at best and laughable even for someone without an advanced degree in biochemistry.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Medication

Carol asks…

For people whoes work is psycology, are those the people who study things like autism?

Like do they study people with austism behavior and try to find out why?
If not, who do?

admin answers:

Some psychologists do study the behavior and cognition of autistic people, and I think that of all the research you can do on autism, this is the most important. If you can understand the different ways autistic people think, then you can teach them better; and better education means more independence. Nowadays, the education many autistic children receive is substandard, inefficient, coercive, or little better than just a place to go and have someone watch you during the school day. Gifted autistic children have even more trouble–they don’t fit into either the special ed class or the gifted class. Many parents of autistic children have chosen to home-school, and have to learn their particular children’s ways of learning before they can teach anything.

So yes. People are researching it, and it is very important. Learning about cognition and learning in the autistic mind could open doors for a lot of people who have been missing out in school, in college, and in the work world.

Unfortunately, much of the research money is going into autism cause and medications for autism treatment–especially towards genetic testing that would detect autism before birth and allow the option of abortion. Needless to say, this does absolutely nothing to help the autistic people who already exist; nor does it sit very well with autistic people and their families, who would on the whole be much happier if their existence weren’t considered a burden better terminated before it began.

I think we would be a lot better off if we knew more about how autistic people learn. Medication covers up symptoms or just drugs a child into compliance; genetic testing can’t help anybody at all. But if you can properly educate an autistic child, you can remove a lot of obstacles for him to reach his potential. I think we’re missing out on the contributions a lot of people who fell through the cracks of the school system thanks to atypical learning styles.

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Question?: Autism Signs 2 Year Old

Susan asks…

Best way to work with an autistic child?

Alright well we recently found out that a two year old relative of mine, a little boy, is autistic. He cannot say any real words, he talks gibberishly occasionally but never tries to communicate with us. The doctors said that we should talk to him a lot now. What are the best things or activities we can do with him to help him learn to talk faster? Thanks!

admin answers:

Children with autism best learn by repetitiveness. Many children with autism like routines. You need to speak to them directly, at eye level and in plain words. Children with autism tend to take things very literally..for example, if you said that’ll be a piece of cake meaning it will be easy, they would look for a piece of cake. When doing things with them it is best to have a clear beginning and ending to the acitvity. If you read Ten Things Every Child With Autism Wishes You Knew, by Ellen Notbohm (link below to excerpt from book), this will give you a better understanding on communicating with them.

His parent(s) should look into a speech therapy assessment. This will help him with his communication and oral motor skills. They should be sure the therapist has knowledge in sign language and the picture exchange communication system (PECS). Many times these forms of communication are used until they can learn to communicate on their own. They should also have an occupational therapy assessment done. This will help him if he has any fine motor skill delays and if he has sensory integration (many children with autism have some type of sensory issue). Left alink below so the parents can print some PEC pictures, and a link to an answer I left for someone else on how to implement PECS. They also need to look at all forms of treatments for their child (learning approaches, complimentary approaches, & biomedical and diet approaches) , you have to do it on trail basis because what may work for one child may not work for another if even their characteristics are the same.

Have them check with the local school board for early intervention services, this can make a big difference. It’s been proven that children with autism who receive early intervention tend to do better than those who don’t. They need to get familiar with special ed, such as individuals with disabilities education act (IDEA), individual family service plan (IFSP), individual education plan (IEP), and 504 plan. (links below for more info on those). He can also receive services such as speech and occupational therapy through the school. Like for my son he receives speech therapy at the school 3 times per week and occupational 1 time per week, outside of school he receives speech 2 times a week and speech 1 time a week. They need to be sure they keep documentation of everything, from assessments to any communication done with anyone about his autism.

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New Autism Web page to debut. But when?

We want to start a new web page on July 4th, 2013. It will be at http://theautismzone.com .  We will use it to raise money to help families with an autistic child.

A common problem with having an autistic child, especially a boy is the amount of big to medium legal hassles.  Did you ever get a call from your sons school saying he is being disruptive in class and you better come down. When you come down, you find he has been tied with a rope to a chair in the hallway for the last week.

Or he was arrested on some felony and you are the legal (Plenary) Guardian. Yet they still made him sign a confession for 4 or 5 things they dreamed up.

How do you get the county to take over his care?

There are a zillion things like this that pop up and since most families of autistic kids are single parent. Who do you ask? We want to set up a few lawyers to ask questions to. Free of cost if possible.
LATE NEWS

I have decided to put this off for a while due to the lawsuit we have going on in my state. We are having a meeting next Friday and (Maybe) I should know something then.

The lawsuit has been put off again till near the end of the month so I am going to Ann Arbor on Monday next week to get some info on starting my new web page project.

So I went to Ann Arbor Today and found out what I need to get The Autism Zone going. It will take a Class C not for profit corporation (which is not too hard to do). Then a 38- Tax ID number which is very easy. Then a 23-C Non-Profit Organization IRS paper filled out. This one could take a month to fill out and a year to be approved. Too long as far as I am concerned. So I better get it in gear!!!

So last week the lawsuit finally ended. I will put the details down in writing but not here on the blog. I will make a special page over on The Autism Zone web page. I will announce it here later.

Question?: Autism Symptoms In 6 Year Old

Nancy asks…

Do you think that the use of Marijuana could result in ADHD or other disorders?

Or would it just be having symptoms?

admin answers:

Hi Hun,

I have ADHD and Bipolar. I am here to tell you that marijuana has only positive results. I am a medical marijuana patient in WA state. A doctor prescribed it for me. When I smoke my thoughts slow down so I can make sense of them. With ADHD my thoughts race. It takes away my suicidal tendencies as well. It stablizes my mood. Here is an article from an aclaimed doctor.

“Dr. Mikuriya reported in 2006 in O’Shaunessy marijuana magazine that a 15-year old child was brought to him by his mother. He had been diagnosed with ADD and psychoses and had been given over 30 different kinds of drugs including pulverized kitchen sink, most of which made him combative and worse. He had used marijuana at age 11 with older friends.

It had a calming effect but his use brought police action and three court ordered rehabs which really drove him crazy. His mother found Dr. Mikuriya who prescribed Marinol which worked. A judge would not let him use ut, but a second judge did allow it and he got a marijuana permit and smoked it with dramatic improved results.

I decided a search of the Internet was advisable and I typed up marijuana autism with the surprising finding that the Autism Research Institute posted an article by Bernard Rinland Ph.D. Medical Marijuana: a valuable treatment for autism in 2003. The site discussed a letter from a mother of a violently autistic child. A friend suggested a marijuana brownie cookie which in the words of the mother “saved my child’s life and my family’s life.”

The article continues to state that many parents in the same situation have reported marked success.

A second article from the American Alliance for Medical Cannabis (AAMC) in 2002 written by Jay R. Cavanaugh Ph.D. Titled Medical Cannabis and Brain Disorders reported effective use as follows: Bipolar disease (81 patients or 20%)
ADHD/ADD (53 patients or 13%)
Multiple Sclerosis (32 patients or 8%)
and neuropathy (35 patients or 9%).

Other interesting findings were PTSD (30 patients at 7%) and obsessive compulsive disorder (2.4 or 6%). They also reported successful treatment of Tourettes, Parkinson’s, and Autism (10 patients or 2%)

It is time we got our medical dinosaurs M.D.S. Out of the closet and educated to the marvelous benefits of this safe effective NEW-OLD medicine.”

“The largest study of its kind has unexpectedly concluded that smoking marijuana, even regularly and heavily, does not lead to lung cancer.

The new findings “were against our expectations,” said Donald Tashkin of the University of California at Los Angeles, a pulmonologist who has studied marijuana for 30 years.

“We hypothesized that there would be a positive association between marijuana use and lung cancer, and that the association would be more positive with heavier use,” he said. “What we found instead was no association at all, and even a suggestion of some protective effect.”

I hope that answers your question 🙂

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Question?: Autism Signs And Symptoms

Sandy asks…

Why are so many children being diagnosed with autism?

It may just be that I notice this because of my hightened awareness, especially since my 2 children are both on the spectrum. It seems like everyday I find out that another person I know has a child with autism, or someone contacts me for advice with their autistic child. Is this really as bad as it seems to me? Why is this an epidemic? What are your theories?

admin answers:

The diagnostic criteria were revised in 1994, allowing more children to be diagnosed. Most importantly, the Asperger’s syndrome diagnosis was created. People who were previously considered simply eccentric are now on the spectrum. Lower-functioning autistics are also more likely to be diagnosed. When Leo Kanner first described autism in the 1940s, he excluded children with other conditions (i.e. Mental retardation and epilepsy) in order to prove that autism was a distinct condition. Now we know that many low-functioning autistics have an intellectual disability, and that epilepsy is relatively common in people with ASDs.

There is also increased awareness, largely due to the Internet. Parents and schools are more likely to notice a child’s symptoms and recognize them as signs of autism. Professionals know more about autism than they did a few decades ago, and can make more accurate diagnoses. Many people are realizing that autism isn’t just a boys’ disorder, so more girls on the spectrum are receiving the correct diagnosis. Because of increased awareness, there is less stigma as well. More people are willing to take their child to be evaluated, and are more open about their child’s autism.

It’s not an epidemic and I don’t believe there are more people out there with autism. It’s just that more people are being *diagnosed* with autism due to criteria changes and awareness. In your situation, it’s very likely that you’re more aware of autistic kids around you. Plus, people may be more likely to discuss an autistic child with you, since you have two of your own.

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