Tag Archives: Autistic Child

Question?: Angry Autistic Child

James asks…

What actions to take when a disabled child is being bullied at school.?

I have a 13 yr. old son with Autism and he is constantly being bullied at school because he is a little different. The school has been notified on three different occasions and nothing seems to be working to prevent this from happening. What can I do?

admin answers:

Go the the district superintendent if the principal isnt doing anything. If that doesn’t work,draw your kid out of school and enroll him in a different school. Bullying an autistic kid is unacceptable! My mom is a life skills teacher and all 4 of her students are my close friends. It makes me angry to hear that someone would bully these kids. I truly hope that this is solved and he doesnt have this happen to him anymore.

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Helen asks…

Is There Something Indigo Children And Adults Can Do To Handle Their Anger At Ignorance And Dishonesty?

***This is a serious question to Spiritual People. Please no criticism or immature behavior.***

Indigo People are very angry people. My question is:

Is There Something Indigo Children And Adults Can Do To Handle Their Innate Anger At Ignorance, Dishonesty, Violent, And Immaturity Of People?

admin answers:

Indigo is a color which was named and defined by Isaac Newton, and the color falls between blue and violet. It is reported that due to its frequency, even people with good eyesight may have trouble distinguishing it from either color.

The term “indigo” as it relates to psychic children refers to the (Life) color of the aura that purportedly emanates around these youths. Many reports will say that indigo children were born in larger proportions since 1987. But we know that there have always been Indigo people, but in lesser proportions. So those Indigo children who are now adults, probably had the most difficult time of all, because there were few others that they could identify with; or few adults, teachers, and others who understood them or knew how to meet their needs or accommodate them.

Indigo children can often have difficulty in conforming to systems and disciplines which our society deems “normal.” They are extremely sensitve (or fragile), highly talented or gifted; and some are even metaphysically inclined. All Indigo children seem to be wise beyond their years. They have spiritual intelligence or psychic abilities.They are talented daydreamers and visionaries. Many will describe them as being born as “old souls.” They have also been described as having an inner truth detector. These children are particularly empathic and compassionate and will go out of their way to help someone who is hurting.

Too many indigo children are misdiagnosed as ADHD or autistic. The majority of these children have acute diet and food sensitivities–especially to processed foods and food additives. Indigo children who are constantly prescribed medication (for such disorders as ADHD) lose their abilities. Other indigo children who have no support or are around people who can not communicate with them or help them to cultivate their abilities may also become dull or lose their ability. Some kids are riduculed and like other gifted kids, will suppress their abilities.

Parents and teachers may suffer difficulties with these children because of their highly refined sensitivities and emotional complexities which make them frustrated due to the average person’s lack of understanding and knowledge of their reality. Indigo children need parents and adults to help them know they are OK. Likewise, Indigo adults need the same -especially for those in the workplace. They also need the freedom to be creative and unmanaged.

These Indigo children appear to be able to consciously link and communicate somewhat on an energetic “telepathic grid.” They apparently have also taken on the responsibility of assisting the rest of humanity in reaching the same level of love awareness they themselves seem to feel.

Below are some selected links that will tell you more about Indigo people. Last year, there was a world premeire movie released on Indigo Children. Perhaps we will review and discuss the movie in class.

According to the makers of the new movie “Indigo,” if nothing else, the evolution of the world could benefit from a shift to encompass the acceptance Indigo people seem to share.

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Lisa asks…

How to handle a child with autism?

I have a little boy that goes to my church that is 5 years old. He has autism. I am asked by his grandmother to watch him ALOT. He always runs away or misbehaves and i have no training in this type of disease. How do you communicate and talk to kids with autism?
As I said in this question, I know NOTHING about autism. I don’t mean to affend in any way

admin answers:

First of all i have a child with autism and its not a disease and as a parent with a child with autism you just offened me its a devlopmetl disabilty please dont put it that way

in my words it would be like 100 pages i found a good list for you

Social management
Behavioural management
Scholastic management

Autism is a communication disorder characterised by a child’s inability to relate to the outside world – physically and emotionally. These children are usually hypersensitive to external environmental stimuli and seem to be withdrawn into an inside world only they have access to. In such a situation, autistic children need special and individualised care from their parents and other caregivers. Here are some guidelines to help deal with an autistic child’s needs.

Social management:

Try to make eye contact with the child.

Organise the child’s environment and daily activities into a routine. Autistic children respond well to routine, which helps them to create order in their world. This could be done by keeping fixed times for food, play and other activities like taking a bath, sleeping, etc.

Provide prior warning of any change in routine – physical or otherwise. For example, if the furniture of the child’s room needs to be moved, the child should be told and allowed to get used to the idea, before the change is made.

Getting angry at the child’s tantrum will not help. In such a case, it is better to allow the child to calm down and then repeat the instructions.

Taking the child to crowded places should be avoided, at least till behavioural therapy has made him more accepting of such outings.

Behavioural management:

Talk to the child in simple and uncomplicated language. Long and subtle sentences should be avoided. For example, instead of saying, “Rahul, would you please come and sit here”, it is better to say, “Rahul, sit here” while pointing to the destination with a finger.

Touch the child often. Though an autistic child will frequently rebuff any effort to touch, research has shown that they begin to respond to touch sooner or later. Instead of making overt efforts to touch the child, a parent should try to make subtle advances like lead the child by holding the arm lightly, or a gentle nudge from behind etc.

The child should be talked to often, rather than waiting for him to initiate conversation. Any effort to talk on the child’s part should be effusely praised. Gradually the child can be encouraged to initiate conversation on his own.

Taking the child’s name every time he is addressed is essential. However, pronouns should be taken care of while talking to him since most autistic children who talk tend to reverse pronouns, using “You” instead of “I” and vice versa. So it may be better to say, “Rahul, YOU can have toast”, rather than “Rahul can have toast”.

It is better to ensure consistency in discipline and demands since autistic children tend to take everything literally. Once a limit or target has been set, it is better to adhere to it at that time. For example, if the time for play has been set for 4 o clock and the parent wants to postpone it, it is better to tell the child, “Rahul we will play at 5”, rather than saying, “We will do that later”.

Scholastic management:

Use visual media as far as possible with background auditory stimuli. For example, while telling a story, the child should preferably be shown a picture book simultaneously. Unlike other children, an autistic child might like to hear the same story everyday providing him with a sense of routine and order.

Give clear, simple and literal tasks to a child to complete and let him finish it before moving on to another activity.

Do not rush the child into keeping pace with others.

The teaching material may be increased in complexity with time.

The child should be encouraged to interact with peers.

Positive reinforcement should be given if the child makes eye contact, speaks, completes an activity or curbs repetitive behaviour. Praise should be effusive. For example., say “Rahul that was excellent. You have done well”, instead of “That was good”.

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Question?: Autistic Angry Outbursts

James asks…

Would it be a huge issue if your autistic child hates receiving discipline as if it were a sensory issue?

Would it be a huge issue if your child with autism had an issue with being disciplined. If a you or someone got angry with him or her, it would cause outbursts and panic as if the child has the ability to have stronger anger than yours or someone whoever gets hard on the child. Even if the child is scared into submission it would make things worse. Would getting angry, frustrated, upset and / or panicky whenever disciplined be a huge issue? It’s discipline which children hate and autistic children tend to hate it more than children. They would hate it so much, it would cause explosive meltdowns. IT would be as if children with autism don’t care who the boss is and would tend to have control over the boss no matter how authoritative.
Does your autistic child have this issue? How big of an issue is it? Do you get frustrated that disciplinary action will make things worse? Does it ruin your marriage having an autistic son with such an issue? Do you feel like your child will never learn?

admin answers:

My autistic child does have this issue to a degree.
I agree with the op that routine is very very much needed.
It does make it more challenging as some autistic children also have sensory issues. My son is hyposensitive (not sensitive enough) to pain and needing lots of pressure.
I’ve even come down to spanking him sometimes to get the point accross. (you know, for safety issues)
It is also difficult because autistic children don’t understand emotions really well. Sometimes I’ll have to tell my son quite clearly, “I am angry’ or I am NOT happy to tell him how I feel.. Or yell.. To communicate those emotions.
Sometimes I feel like my son will never learn, but I know he will .. Eventually. Over time, I have seen what my son used to do, but now doesn’t do a certain behavior anymore.
I wouldn’t say ‘ruin’ is the right word to describe a marriage with a special needs child in the mix. It definitely makes it more stressful, and a little bit more strain on a marriage. Just as you adapt to having a special needs child, you adapt to fit your son/daughter’s needs and adjust the time that is needed to spend on your child.

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Carol asks…

How could one take care an autistic child?

She is 24 years old now and cannot talk. When she is annoyed, she will have violent tantrums by suddenly gripping another person’s hair then banging her head on his head. What should we do? We are from the Philippines.

admin answers:

It is so difficult bringing up an autistic child. You need support people around to help because its a 24/7 task. I have a niece who’s autistic. She cannot talk either, at 18. She also grabs people’s hair, usually to smell it. She seems to live by ‘triggers’. For instance, if she is taken for a walk, after that she has to do a certain thing followed by something else – always the same. And if something is different or changes she becomes confused and then angry, but if we get her back into her routine she calms down quickly.
Please find help because her tantrums sound quite bad and if she’s like my niece she will be very strong. All she knows is something is not right with her but she won’t know about the pain it will be causing for family. There is a way of controlling her behaviour but you must seek help, maybe first through your doctor.
It is so hard I know. I love my autistic niece. There is something so special about her. She’s brave and she knows so many things that she cannot express. I wish you all the best and hope that you find the right people to help.

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

William asks…

How should I go about getting answers from our pediatrician?

I have three kids. Ages 6 yrs, 3 yrs, and 18 months. Our pediatrician has prescribed Polyethylene Glycol for two of my three kids for long term programs. Polyethylene Glycol, otherwise known as PEG’s or MiraLax, is a laxative made from linking longer strands of Ethylene Glycol together. Alone, Ethelyne Glycol is a very toxic chemical. In 2001 the F.D.A passed it’s use for ages 17 and up for up to 7 days. Since then, the F.D.A.’s adverse reports have said that PEG’s cause numerous issues in children including kidney failure, heart disease, and nueropsychiatric events such as autism, alzheimers, schizophrenia, and dementia. I was never told any of this and the pediatricians still prescribed programs containing over 17 mgs of this poison to my children every day. WITHOUT TESTING TO FIND A DIAGNOSIS. I am extremely angry and seriously considering lawsuits. My 6 yr old is autistic btw. I’m not giving them this chemical again, but, I need to somehow talk the pediatrician into doing his damn job and finding the problem. Any suggestions?
Point of reference that PEG’s are NOT approved for long term use….
http://www.gutsense.org/gutsense/the-role-of-miralax-laxative-in-autism-dementia-alzheimer.html
Thank you Shea. The symptoms are fecal impaction associated with autism. A huge hurtle for people with ASD’s is sensory impairments. My son can’t handle a lot of foods and hates water. My daughter was 6 wks old when she was prescribed MiraLax for constipation associated with hard dry stools. She was breastfed and I changed my diet drastically to try to correct the problem.

admin answers:

You need to ask for a pediatric GI consult. Pediatricians shouldn’t be prescribing long term GI treatment without a GI specialist’s input.

However, Miralax has been approved in long term treatment of certain bowel problems, and I have a son who’s been on it for years and will continue to be. So it’s not totally out of the question, but you do need someone who is familiar with the problem (and an actual diagnosis) and how to treat it, not a regular pediatrician who doesn’t specialist in it.

If the pediatrician won’t refer you, get a new pediatrician.

Eta – Again, I urge you to see a pediatric GI specialist. As I said, FOR CERTAIN PROBLEMS they have been approved. I’m not saying you have to remain on it, that’s why you should see a specialist, they will give you other forms of treatment if you like. I do appreciate your link and input, but believe me, this is something I have researched to exhaustion and am comfortable with my son’s treatment.

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

William asks…

How do you deal with temper tantrums from a 3 yr old boy who could be autistic?

Pulling hair, biting, pushing…with no anger expression in his face…usually smiling or laughing when he does it..its like he gets in a zone of his own world running around the room followed by a few violent acts like that then he calms down..

I babysit this child by the way…

admin answers:

First ask the parents what they do. One hopes they have visuals, pictures and a plan – you need to know that plan. If they are clueless – and are hoping it will just stop – please encourage them to seek assistance from their local school district if they are in the US.

In general – you need to be alert enough to catch the child BEFORE they implode. Maybe their face gets different or it’s about a particular thing. If you can change the activity before the anger that might help. The more angry he is the less he will be able to process any words. If there is something he likes – Sponge Bob or Lego’s etc. Have a picture handy and show him to redirect to something appealing and of high interest.

The bottom line though is that the family needs some help.

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Legal Guardian Yet?

Hi, This is Bob the guy that runs this blog.
If you have an autistic child, It is my opinion that you should go and get yourself made the legal Guardian.
You will have to have a lawyer. You can probably get one appointed.
You have to file at the local Probate Court – Mental Division
Bring your doctors paperwork. Get the details from your lawyer.
The reason I am writing this right now is because the best Guardianship to get is Plenary Guardian.
I recently found out that courts are resisting giving out the Plenary type.
I have found it worth the extra effort to get the Plenary type because it means that your word is it.
No one else can interfere with your decisions. Believe me there are plenty of people out there to do that.
Bob

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Sharon asks…

A question about genetics. I have a child with ?

PDD-NOS, which is an autism spectrum disorder. I’ve read that normally people have a 1 in 150 chance of having a child with autism, but it jumps up to 1 in 20 for people who already have an autistic child.

My question is, does anyone know what my chances would be of having a child with classic autism or Rett‘s syndrome? I’m not worried about having a child with PDD-NOS or Aspergers, but I do have concerns about having a child with classic autism.
Hi Sally! Last July my son had been checked for Fragile X since he not only has PDD, but also scored low on a few I.Q. tests and has hyper-flexibility in his joints. However, he was not found to have this condition. I thank God, because I was terrified.

He’s seeing the genetics counselor again next Monday (for what, I do not know) but when I had asked the doctor the question, I didn’t receive much more than an answer that I have around a 1 in 20 chance of having another child with an ASD, but wasn’t informed on the risk for having one with classic autism. I was just hoping that possibly someone here knew the risk.

admin answers:

Hi …I am not sure but i was told i ‘might’ have another child with autism if i were to have another baby, i know a lady who has three children two girls and a boy the two older girls both have autism one more severe than the other the boy doesn’t have problems, so i would say yes there is always a chance

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Question?: Autism Signs In Adults

Maria asks…

What would autistic parents teach an autistic child?

Autism is a mutation in the brain, and mutations can be either helpful or harmful (mutations are what brought mankind to where it is today). Suppose for a moment that we all see autism as normal yet different from what is socially normal. How would autistic people live in a society where everyone is also autistic? How would they interact, and what would they teach each other? What would career environments be like? How would homes be built? What would be valued, and what wouldn’t be?

What would the autistic life be like?
This is what I am trying to ask.

I don’t believe autism should be seen as a “disorder” or a handicap but rather a different way of thinking and different behavior.
I read in Times magazine that autistic people have less “grey matter” and more “white matter” in their brains, and that’s why there has to be a mutation in their genes that makes it that way.
And to the person who says that it’s a disorder and that autistic people cannot compete with the rest of society, what I am stating is: what if they didn’t have to compete and had dominance in society?

admin answers:

Autism is NOT a mutation in the brain. When looking at fMRI scans and regular MRI scans, you will NOT find some defining anomoly characteristic of autism.

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and is the result of a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain, impacting development in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with autism typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and leisure or play activities. One should keep in mind however, that autism is a spectrum disorder and it affects each individual differently and at varying degrees – this is why early diagnosis is so crucial. By learning the signs, a child can begin benefiting from one of the many specialized intervention programs (see treatment and education).

And you are right, it should not be considered a disorder. It only is due to social standards created today. Austistic people are just different. They use their brain differently, and sometimes very uniquely. Like the Rain Man.

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