Tag Archives: Autistic Behavior

Question?: Autistic Behavior

Nancy asks…

What would be the steps to take for someone who wants to work with Autistic children?

I’m 17 and I want to work to work with Autistic children and their family. I have a nephew with Autistic characteristics and a cousin who’s autistic and I want to be in a field where I help autistic children and their families. What type of classes would I have to take in college?

admin answers:

You would take classes in early childhood development, and child psychology to start. A class in behavioral analysis would be valuable as well as behavior management.

Learning about speech therapy and sign language would be great tools to have and increase your value to employers and families in the future as well. Being bilingual English/spanish would really open more doors for you. There are not enough therapists with a good command of both languages, and the Spanish speaking population is often very underserved in this area.

Here’s a great website with a list and description of courses that would be valuable http://www.universalclass.com/i/subjects/specialed.htm

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

Joseph asks…

How would a genius Aspie male do with a childlike Autistic girl who’s innocent in a relationship?

This was just a random thought for an idea for a couple. How do you think this couple would work? Just imagine the though of an annoying Autistic girl clinging onto a random Aspie genius. I personally think that this is the brilliant idea for a couple.

admin answers:

I doubt that such a relationship would last very long. The girl’s clingy behavior and childlike demeanor would probably irritate the guy so much that he would say something very blunt to her, walk away and attempt to avoid further interaction between them.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

Helen asks…

What do you do with a student who displays autistic behavior and the parents don’t want any testing done?

The child is constantly interrupting with verbal outbursts or banging on floor or table. I just need to make it to the end of the school year with my sanity. I can put the student on a computer and they will be quiet, but they also need to do classwork – which they will not complete unless someone is hovering over them. Student is very capable of doing work and is intelligent – The social worker and principal are aware of the situation but our hands are tied.

admin answers:

Instead of trying to get him classified which would take weeks since the team would have to gather assessments and the team is busy with the IEP’s can you start a 504 for support or a behavior plan without the parents consent? I am a parent of an autistic spectrum child in a mainstream class. For classwork he has a corral around his desk so he is less distracted, he wears earmuffs so he doesn’t respond to every classroom noise, his desk is in the least stimulated part of the room, he gets reinforcers every 8 minutes for a pointcard which after four reinforcers he cashes in for a preferred activity, he has a breakcard for when he is overwhelmed, he has a schedule on his locker and desk, he is warned ahead of time if the schedule changes for a firedrill, or assembly. He has a timer, a peer mentor, the OT takes him to do some movement for sensory integration, a special ed. Teacher comes into the classroom for support, he sits on a core disc. Can the parents come into observe or be willing to strategize on how to help their son be less impulsive and disruptive and improve his attention? Can the parents volunteer in the class? To help my son complete work it is pre-taught the night before at home. Directions are given as simplistic as possibe, an example is given, and he has to repeat the directions back. Letting him fail as a wake up call to the parents as suggested by SPED teacher is not an option. When you have that kind of burned out mentality you aren’t doing your job well anymore and its time to move on. That attitude really sucks and its sad to see that apparently SPED teacher is actively teaching. Thank god my child doesn’t have her! Another thing that helps is knocking out the harder classwork in the am. I am glad you are trying to look for suggestions to help him be successful. That is the sign of a good teacher.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

Mark asks…

How do I make my autistic son to understand that he cannot hit himself?

Whenever my son is punished for unacceptable behavior, he goes into his room and hits himself. His autism is very mild. He is high-functioning. His behavior is his biggest obstacle. He speaks very loudly. He talks back when he is told “no.” Is there anyone that is experiencing this? Does therapy help?

admin answers:

I know exactly what you are going through. I was exactly like that as a small child, and to some extent, I still am…lol
I’m high functioning autistic as well (Asperger’s Syndrome).
Maybe you could consult a child psychologist. I was diagnosed at age 13 (I’m 16 now) by a child psychologist, and have been seeing her regularly ever since. Autism is a social difference (I despise the use of the word ‘disorder’), so autistic kids don’t see social situations as most neurotipycals (‘normal’ people) do. My psychologist has worked through various social situations with me and is helping me understand how to fit in better with society. It can help later on in life if he starts learning about proper social behaviour at an early age.
Another good site to check out is http://www.aspiesforfreedom.com
It’s a forum for all people on the autism spectrum, and for parents of autistic kids. I’ve gained a tom of great advice from people there.
Hope that helped. =]

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

William asks…

How can the actions of an autistic / low IQ person be categorized into autistic behavior or IQ behavior.?

How can violent outbursts be broken into either autistic action vs the low IQ issues?
How can violent outbursts be broken into either autistic action vs the low IQ issues?

The man is ‘retarded’, a legal term, IQ 58. Also Autistic. Are all actions co-joined, or can some violent acts be related to his IQ or are all related to both?

admin answers:

Autism and low-IQ are significantly different things. What exactly is your question? The diagnosis would be based not on whether they have a low IQ or even whether they are aggressive, but instead on whether they meet the behavioral criteria for autism (not understanding social interactions, limited verbal skills, sensory sensitivity, etc.). Mental retardation (ok, so it’s not PC anymore, but it’s the officer term for it) is diagnosed based on completely different criteria.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

Mary asks…

How young can you first notice the social differences of a autistic child?

I have heard that autism can’t be diagnosed until a child is about 1 year or older. I am wondering if autistic children behave the same way as non-autistic children as a babies (less than 1 year old)? I also know that autism affects a child’s ability to interact/communicate/socialize with others. I’m wondering if a happy baby who smiles ALL THE TIME and loves people could develop autism or if most autistic kids were more withdrawn as a baby?

admin answers:

Can’t speak for all autistic children here, but my son from a very early age seemed to absorb everything going on around him; sometimes looked at people and sometimes didn’t; showed little receptive/expressive/interactive responses to the attention of others and all this was obvious from around the age approx. 3 months (possibly earlier, when the ‘average’ baby can be seen to respond in an interactive manner to the attention of others).
He was formally diagnosed with autism at the age of two.
But I knew from the above mentioned very early age that he was a little different to my other children. (Adored him no less)
Some close friends and family even stated that he seemed to be a wise soul who seemed he had “been here before”.
If my son had displayed an avid interaction with those around him (and me) as a baby, I may never have suspected the possibility of autism.
Having many family members and friends on the spectrum, I have observed their varying degrees of interaction with others (particularly the ones I have known as babies), but the one-on-one interaction before the age of 1 was generally minimal.
Some children travel through early baby-hood seeming to respond ‘normally’, only to appear to ‘change’ to ‘silent-mode’ and present with autistic behaviours after e.g. Vaccinations.
Personally, I don’t believe in the vaccination ‘connection’.
Autism, I believe, is genetic by nature.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

Robert asks…

The Autism Behavior Consultant won’t work with my son. What do we do now?

My 20 year old son has Aspergers and severe depression. We had a consultation with a consultant that seemed promising to me but we got the word today that he won’t work with my son until we get the depression under control. My son has strange reactions to antidepressants so I am nervous about putting him back on one. How do we help him with the depression so we can work on the Autistic behaviors that are causing so much trouble for him (and contributing to the depression)? Help!!!!

admin answers:

Hi Jayne,
*I would check with your physician/psychiatrist: Is it depression? Or is it anxiety?
Perhaps the strange reaction is because that isn’t what he is experiencing.
*Dr. Amen’s website and books list meds that have been used and are used to treat people experiencing a range of needs. Tony Atwood is the guru on the topic too. Or maybe try an herbal, holistic med.??
*Have you tried calm down techniques? A squeeze ball, a rabbit’s foot to rub, velcro on the inside of the pocket, gum, special smells..Lavender ??
*Music therapy or teaching yoga or meditation might be helpful too. It has worked with some of my students, as did the aforementioned.
*In PA we have case managers? Is this resource available for you? They can help find resources for you and be an advocate. Also we have behavioral services with a consulting psychologist and a behavioral intervention support team (Mobile Therapist and Therapeutic Support Staff).
Hope this helps.
Best wishes.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

William asks…

What could be the cause of such a spike in childhood ailments the past 20 years?

Seems like just in the past 15-20 years we suddenly have seen a big spike in kids with autism and food allergies, such as peanut allergies. I find it hard to believe that 1 in every 100 or so kids has autism. Don’t tell me misdiagnosis. I went to a school with a couple thousand kids and I don’t remember anyone with autistic behaviors nor did I know anyone with a peanut allergy. It was practically unheard of! Why is this such a new phenomenon?

admin answers:

The thing is we keep things to clean and sterile and they dont build up a tolerance to everyday stuff like dirt and we feed them processed crap with high levels of suger, fizzy drinks, and so on and the child gets hyper and then diagonalised as having behavioural problems.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Behavior

Sandra asks…

Neighbor is snobby and threatening to call child protective services?

My autistic child elopes and this is common for autistic behavior. I cannot physically hold him in, he is being defiant. I ask the neighbors if they had seen him, they threatened me and continued gossiping. I am really concerned with how I can live here, with the snotty neighbors anymore? We have services (so many) but nothing can prevent everything this child does. I am a good parent.

admin answers:

“Elopes”, as in run away? Your CHILD runs away? Then its your responsibility to prevent that from happening, because he is still a CHILD.. With a DISABILITY… And you are his legal GUARDIAN. Im not being cruel, but do you see how this LOOKS? Im trying to show you! If you don’t do your job, then it may be determined that someone else may have to, in order to protect the child. Be very careful with the threat of reports against you because they can easily be found legit and your boy end up being taken away. I know you’re a good parent, that’s why you are reaching out to Yahoo answers for help… My best advice to you is to use every device necessary to keep tabs on him at all times… Child proof locking gates, sound devices, monitors, bells, whistles, sirens, etc.. You get my drift. Not to sound cruel or anything, but think of him as if you were working with a huge baby tiger or even a large gorilla. You would actually need a special pen or enclosure to be able to safely contain him, defiant or not.
I would suggest you sit with your neighbors, explain these needs and ask for their help and assistance in helping you watch out for your boy.
Also, go to your local church and ask them for help in making home improvements that could help secure him better.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Importance of Autism Awareness

English: Subject: Quinn, an ~18 month old boy ...Autism Awareness

Autism is defined as a persistent developmental disorder that impacts normal working of brain characterized by difficulty in communication and social interaction (Atwood, 2012). Other key characteristics associated with autistic behavior include restrictive, repetitive and stereotypical patterns of behaviors, interests and activities (Atwood, 2012). This developmental disorder is usually detected within the first three years of an individual’s life (Atwood, 2012).

Autism United is a dedicated body that is working tirelessly to promote the cause of autism in the United States (Autism United, 2012). Every year on 2nd of April autism awareness day is celebrated in the United Sates (Autism United, 2012). Garreth Dickson, founder of Autism United is of the view that one positive aspect of creating autism awareness is that it greatly furthers the cause of finding a treatment and possible prevention methods for the disease (Autism United, 2012). Another helpful feature of creating autism awareness is that a number of misconceptions existing in the minds of people regarding the disease are dispelled. Creating autism awareness also ensures that people are better aware of the exact reasons behind this developmental disorder (Autism United, 2012).

Creating autism awareness ensures that people are aware that:

Autism is not an emotional or mental health disorder as is commonly believed. It is actually a biological illness that influences the normal growth and development of human brain (Salahi, 2008).Advances made in medical sciences have ensured that treatments are created to improve autistic children abilities through early intervention and Applied Behavioral Analysis techniques yet no method has been developed till date that can be singled out for curing children and adults suffering from autism (Salahi, 2008).The belief that autism results in children with cold, uncaring parents propagated in 1940 by Austrian doctor Bruno Bettelheim has been rendered as wrong. Director of UCLA’s center for autism research, Dr. Daniel Geshwind, opines that most of scientific research studies done for diagnosing the causes of autism reveal a strong genetic predisposition in most of the patients with autism and no evidence has been found that links autism to how the children were raised by the parents (Salahi, 2008).Another common misconception is that individuals with autism always have some hidden talent, Robert W. Marion, M.D., director Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center (CERC) at Albert Einstein College of Medicine clarifies that though a minor group of individuals with autism have extraordinary skills a condition referred to as Savantism, most of them do not possess any special skills or talent (Salahi, 2008).The opinion that all autistic people have trouble forming social relations is wrong according to Dr. Marion, he states that although some autistic people on the severe end of spectrum have difficulty entering into social relationship most other autistic children have friends and easily form close relationships (Salahi, 2008).

Autism is a complicated disorder, but the people suffering from autism can be as functional as any other normal person, they have all the right to love and be loved, obtain education, get a good job and live their life peacefully.

References

Atwood, M. (2012). Living With Autism. ABDO.

Autism United. (2012). Welcome to Autism United. Retrieved September 3, 2012, from Autism United: http://www.autismunited.org/

Salahi, L. (2008, October 23). 10 Myths About Autism. Retrieved September 3, 2012, from abc news: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/ColdandFluNews/story?id=6089162&page=1#.UEhQfaDfiSp

Enhanced by ZemantaTagged as: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Applied behavior analysis, Autism, autism awareness, Autism spectrum, Bruno Bettelheim

View the original article here