Tag Archives: Autism Spectrum Disorders

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Donald asks…

Survey: How aware are you?

today is autism awareness day and all of april is autism awareness month i want to see how aware people actually are by asking afew questions
answer with what you honestly know if you want to look up the answers after you answer yours feel free to but not till you answer first

Question 1. what is meant by “autism spectrum” disorders?
2. What are sensory issues?
3 true or false if someone is not diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder by age 12 that means they dont have one.
4. true or false autism is very rare in girls
5.true or false autism spectrum disorders are obvious and you can tell right away if someone has autism
6. what is asperger’s syndrome?

bonus question: can you read this article then tell me your reaction and weather you learned anything new http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/05/dont-judge-a-mother-until-you-know-the-whole-story/
oh and for why its in this section is because i feel in my opinion part of being spiritual is being in tune with the world around us and understanding others (or atleast trying to understand others)

admin answers:

1. The autism spectrum consists of classical autism, Asperger’s syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and PDD-NOS. All these disorders involve social and communication issues in some way. The symptoms appear early in childhood and last throughout the lifetime.

2. Sensory issues are a common feature of autism spectrum disorders. Most frequently they are hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity, either in general or with specific stimuli. For example, I’m extremely sensitive to sound, and metal on metal is one sound in particular that’s painful for me. I’m hyposensitive to pain. Another common issue is difficulty filtering out background information, like music playing in the background. Sensitivity and filtering problems can lead to constant sensory overload.

3. False. The symptoms appear early on, but they aren’t necessarily caught early on. I wasn’t diagnosed with Asperger’s until I was 17.

4. False. It appears more common in boys, but the gender gap is actually a lot narrower. Girls are more likely to be misdiagnosed or undiagnosed for a variety of social and cultural reasons.

5. False. People with ASDs may not appear particularly unusual, or they may seem eccentric but not exactly autistic. If everyone could tell right away if someone had an ASD, mental health professionals are wasting their time with diagnostic evaluations!

6. Asperger’s is a mild form of autism. It’s very similar to HFA, but there’s no speech delay.

BQ: I liked the article. I think its meaning can apply to everyone – it’s important to not judge people right away, because you don’t know the whole story. What appears to be a poorly behaved child and an unconcerned mother is actually an overstimulated, anxious autistic child and a caring mother who’s trying to help him the best she can. Everyone has challenges that aren’t obvious from the outside, so it’s important to withhold judgment and keep an open mind, since there’s often more to a situation than meets the eye.

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Thomas asks…

Could my little sister have a mild form of autism?Any advice or tips?

My little sister is 3 years old and screams alot for stupid little things that may happen.Some of her behavior makes me concerned that she may have a mild form of autism.She’s very smart for her age though.

admin answers:

Most children with autism are VERY smart for their age and have a HIGH physical abilities! My four year old son is autistic. I would like to also add after reading some of the other answers just now that there ARE different levels of autism. Some are higher functioning than others, and MR does NOT always go hand in hand with autism.

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Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism Spectrum Disorders, or ASD, are a group of developmental disabilities characterized by abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and the presence of repetitive behaviors or restricted interests. Some professionals may use the term Pervasive Developmental Disorders, or PDD, instead of ASD.

Incidence
ASD or PDD occurs 4 to 5 times more often in boys than in girls. Symptoms are present before the age of three, although diagnosis may occur later. ASD affects individuals from all racial, ethnic, and social backgrounds.

Cause
Nobody knows what causes ASD. Scientists believe that there are chemical and biological differences in how the brain functions, and there may be genetic factors involved. Parents do not cause autism spectrum disorders. No factors in a child’s experience or in parenting styles are responsible for ASD.

Prognosis
ASD is a lifelong disability, but with intensive and early intervention, individuals with ASD can and do make excellent progress and improve their quality of life. While there is no known cure for ASD, there are many intervention strategies designed to address the problems associated with ASD.

Characteristics
Although difficulties in social interaction, communication, and restricted or repetitive behavior are general characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders, the specific diagnoses are distinguished by the types, numbers, and severity of symptoms.
Communication
Some children develop speech, and then regress, or lose communication skills. Others echo or repeat what they hear. Many individuals with ASD do learn to talk, while others rely on technology, sign, or pictures to communicate. However, conversational skills, gestures, and non-verbal communication strategies remain difficult for most individuals with ASD.
Social Interaction
Persons with ASD often have difficulty interacting with others, learning to play with peers, and developing friendships, even though some may be very interested in having friends. They often have difficulty using and understanding eye contact, facial expressions, and social rules. They can be unaware of the interests and perspectives of other people, and may, therefore, become socially isolated and misunderstood.
Interests and Behavior
Some persons with autism may engage in repetitive behavior, like switching a light on and off, spinning, or rocking. Some may play with toys in an unusual manner, like lining toy cars up instead of pretending to drive them. They may insist on doing the same thing in the same way, and may have difficulty with changes to their surroundings or routines. Individuals with ASD also have difficulty processing information from their senses. For example, they may dislike the feel of certain fabrics or the texture of certain foods. Some individuals are very active and have difficulty with sleep. Some engage in challenging behavior, such as aggression, self-injury, or severe withdrawal.

Types
Neither ASD nor PDD are specific diagnoses. The specific ASD/PDD diagnoses are: Autism, Asperger Syndrome (AS), Rett’s Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). These specific diagnoses are considered “Spectrum disorders” because the severity of impairment varies from person to person and can change over time as a result of intervention. Because it is sometimes difficult to pinpoint the exact diagnosis, some professionals may refer to individuals as being “on the spectrum”. For example, one child with ASD may struggle to learn to use words to communicate while another may be capable of carrying on a long conversation, but will only care to talk about certain topics. Many show a strong aptitude in one area, while remaining weak in others.
Autism
Autism is the most well-known form of ASD. Often the most noteworthy piece of this diagnosis is a sever impairment in social skills, People with autism may prefer to play or work alone, and seek social interaction only as needed. Autism can occur with or without mental retardation or other health problems, such as seizure disorders. The first signs of autism usually are recognized during the second year of life, and may include odd, delayed, or absent speech development.
Asperger Syndrome
Asperger Syndrome (AS) is marked by significant difficulties in social interaction but in contrast to autism, there are no obvious delays in the development of speech. However, individuals often have more subtle problems with language and non-verbal communication. Persons with AS are likely to have average to above average intelligence, yet may have difficulty functioning in traditional school and work environments. A unique characteristic that many AS individuals show is an intense interest in one or two subjects to the exclusion of others. When speaking, these individuals tend to be formal, and they may not be skilled at conversational turn taking. Individuals with AS are typically diagnosed later than individuals with autism.
PDD-NOS
PDD-NOS is an abbreviation for Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified. The diagnosis of PDD-NOS is usually given to an individual who does not meet the exact diagnostic criteria for any of the other diagnoses in ASD, yet clearly shows unusual development in social interaction, communication skills or interests, and behavior. Often, individuals with PDD-NOS diagnosis have better social or communication skills than individuals diagnosed with autism and may have fewer problems with repetitive behaviors or restricted interests.

Taken from CARD’s “A Map for Your Journey”

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“SPEAK UP LOUD FOR THOSE WHO CANNOT”
Today 80% of the Autism population is under 18.

In 2005, The Center For Disease Control announces that autism is the fastest growing serious developmental disability in the United States. In 2005 estimated that 1.77 million Americans are affected by autism. In real terms the estimated autistic population of 1 million plus cases in 2004 could reach 5 to 25 million by 2015. In 1994 the autism rate was rare and was estimated to be 1 in 10,000. In 2004 the autism epidemic revised rate was estimated to be 1 in 200. In 2005 the autism epidemic revised rate is now estimated to be 1 in 166 by the Center For Disease Control. In 2015 the statistics indicate the estimated rate could be as high as 1 in 7, if this 1994 to 2004 exponential growth rate continues at its present rate.

Therefore no matter who you are or where you live, Democrat or Republican, if these statistics of the past carry forward through the next decade; your family may be devastated by autism in the next decade… The current autism epidemic could become the most devastating epidemic in history, with 10-15% of the population afflicted in the next decade that need long term care. Many experts associate a genetic predisposition triggered be high levels of mercury in the environment together as the cause of Autism.

The latest study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1 in 12 American women of childbearing age has mercury levels in her blood above the levels considered safe for the developing fetus. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency experts have estimated that 630,000 infants are born every year with unsafe levels of mercury.

These higher mercury levels in the mothers body can be passed on during pregnancy. These 1 in 12 mothers could be unknowingly predisposing their unborn child to become autistic due to high levels of mercury passed on from the mother during pregnancy. It is now recommended that pregnant women not eat tuna fish, which is known to be high in mercury. Even small trace amounts of Mercury are known to be harmful to developing fetuses and never break down in the body. Mercury vapors can remain airborne for a year. These vapors can therefore travel around the world and we could be accumulating mercury in our bodies by inhaling them that over time.

According to a recent study of mercury emissions throughout the world. Coal fueled power plants in the U.S. Emit 48 tons of toxic mercury vapors into the air per year. China emits 1000 tons of toxic mercury vapors per year. The toxicity buildup of breathing these vapors along with mercury fillings over a period of decades within our bodies, may be the cause of the high levels mercury in women of childbearing age. Vaccines with mercury further spike an already high level of mercury passed on from the mother during pregnancy at a critical time in the infants development Vaccines with mercury may be the trigger that causes autism in children with a genetic predisposition for autism and an already high level of mercury passed on from the mother.

Acute mercury poisoning and Autism share many similar symptoms. Women who are pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant should now consider have their blood tested for elevated levels of mercury. We must ask the government to make Autism Awareness and prevention a national priority. Those who are saying that the numbers were under represented in the past are burying their heads in the sand.

“Houston, we have a problem”, we are going to have the next generation devastated by this disease if left unchecked at its present growth rate. This epidemic must quickly become the major health initiative of our time just as the search for the cure for aids has. Otherwise the effects on the next generation, families, businesses and the economy will be catastrophic. We can no longer wait for this “simmering modern day plague of the 21st century” to arrive at our doorstep in the form of a lost generation of innocent, helpless, unsuspecting children that through no fault of their own will need a lifetime of care.

Autism Awareness is Key

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Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Richard asks…

Is being in your own little world a part of autism?

I have autism spectrum disorder or aspergers syndrome and I am in my own little world most of the time. It distracts me form my learning I start thinking about star trek or videogames or something else. I wonder is this a part of AS? Because I can be looking at the teacher and daydreaming at the same time and not get the assignment. Are most kids with aspurgers syndrome in there own little worlds? How can I get out of there?

admin answers:

It’s quite common for people with autism spectrum disorders to be in their own world a lot, but not everyone on the autism spectrum is like that and some people who are not on the spectrum are in their own world too.

I think being in our own world a lot can probably be explained at least partly by our environment not being suitable for us. I have Asperger’s syndrome too and I’m in my own world most of the time and I seem to go there when there is either too little or too much stimuli in my environment. I go to my own world in attempt to regulate the stimuli to make it the way I need it to be.

When I was in school I was bored most of the time, because the things we were studying about were too easy for me, so I kept my mind busy by being in my own world a lot, dealing with something more challenging. When I felt lonely and didn’t really have any friends or family to feel close to, I went to my own world to spend time with imaginary, loving friends. At my current working place there is excessive sensory input and I go to my own world a lot to try to block out some of the sensory input and distractions around me. I don’t go to my own world when I’m in a good, suitable environment with an appropriate amount of challenges and sensory experiences and balanced emotions.

I’ve never really attempted to stop being in my own world, because I don’t consider it much of a problem, but I guess that if i wanted to, I’d try to do it by trying to make my environment more suitable somehow, for example by making sure I have something challenging and interesting to do, but a good sensory and emotional environment to do it in.

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Maternal Antibodies Linked to Autism

Some children with autism are born to mothers carrying antibodies that bind to proteins involved in brain development.
By Ed Yong | July 9, 2013 http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/36379/title/Maternal-Antibodies-Linked-to-Autism/

In 2008, Judy van de Water from the University of California, Davis, discovered a group of autoantibodies—those that trigger immune responses against the body’s own molecules—that are especially common in mothers of children with autism. Now, her team has identified what these antibodies bind to: six proteins involved in varied aspects of brain development. By crossing the placenta and affecting these proteins in a fetus’s brain, the maternal antibodies could increase the risk of developmental problems in some cases of autism, according to the new research, published today (July 9) in Translational Psychiatry.

“I cannot laud these authors enough,” said Andrew Zimmerman, a neurologist from the Kennedy Krieger Institute, who has also been studying maternal antibodies but was not involved in this study. “Given that, at present, only between 15 and 20 percent of children with autism have known causes—mainly genetic and infectious mechanisms—this will be a major advance.”

Van de Water’s team, led by graduate student Dan Braunschweig, is now using their discovery to develop a test that predicts a child’s risk of developing autism spectrum disorders based on the mother’s antibodies. “It would allow mothers to plan,” said van de Water, by enrolling their children in educational programs that promote social skills from an early age.

The antibody hypothesis would only apply to a quarter of autism cases at most, but van de Water said that it is valuable for affected parents to get some clues about the biology behind their children’s condition. “It provides some answers,” she said. “They couldn’t have done anything about this—it’s not like they did anything to cause the antibodies. But as a parent, you just want to know what happened so you can move forward.”

The proteins that the team identified have a wide variety of roles. STIP1 influences the creation of new neurons, for example, while cypin affects the number of branches they have. CRMP1 and CRMP2 stop neurons from growing and determine their length. YBX1 is involved in gene transcription, as well as neural migration during development. Finally, LDH is the most mysterious of the sextet but is also the most strongly linked to autism. Earlier studies suggest that it may play a role in metabolism or in responses to viruses or toxins.

All six are highly expressed in the fetal brain. Of 246 mothers with children living with autism, 23 percent had antibodies that recognized two or more of these proteins, compared to just 1 percent of 149 mothers with normally developing children. The antibodies have more than 99 percent specificity for autism risk, which means that they have less than a 1 in a 100 chance of finding a false positive.

Meanwhile, the team’s colleagues Melissa Bauman and David Amaral, also from UC Davis, injected eight pregnant rhesus monkeys with antibodies purified from mothers with autistic children. These monkeys were more protective towards their young during their first 6 months, compared to those that were injected with antibodies from women with neuro-typical children. As the young monkeys grew up, they showed unusual social behavior: compared to typical macaques, they were more likely to approach both familiar peers and strangers, even when their advances weren’t rewarded with sustained social interactions.

“Moving this to monkeys is a big step,” said Paul Patterson, a neuroimmunologist from the California Institute of Technology, who was not involved in the work. “This very careful behavioral study shows that at least some of the antibodies do have an effect on fetal brain development.”

Betty Diamond, an immunologist at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, agrees the studies represent “an important step forward.” However, she noted that antibodies often bind to many possible targets, and the proteins that the team identified may not be the relevant ones. She also said that some of the alleged target proteins are found within cells, “and it is not clear how or whether the antibodies can penetrate developing neurons.”

Zimmerman added, “Much work remains to be done to show how these antibodies are relevant, how they affect fetal brain development, and what factors lead some mothers to develop these antibodies.”

The team is now working to address these issues, trying to identify the specific parts of the six proteins that the antibodies stick to, determine how they affect the developing brain, and understand how they might be used to predict autism risk. Van de Water and Amaral are consulting for Pediatric Bioscience, which is creating a predictive test based on the results.

“The next step is to come up with a therapeutic to block the antibodies—not just to pick them up, but to do something about it,” said van der Water. Although the concept of preventing autism can be controversial, she points out that her panel of antibodies seem to correlate with the most severe symptoms and language problems.

Still, she is treading cautiously. “The parents have been surprisingly supportive,” she said. “But the autism field has been fraught with false alarms, so we want to be really careful.”

D. Braunschweig et al., “Autism-specific maternal autoantibodies recognize critical proteins in developing brain,” Translational Psychiatry, 3:e277, 2013.

M.D. Bauman et al., “Maternal antibodies from mothers of children with autism alter brain growth and social behaviour development in the rhesus monkey,” Translational Psychiatry, 3:e278, 2013.

Clarification (July 10): This story has been updated from its original version, which included this quote in relation to a potential test: “If it’s positive, their risk is virtually 100 percent”. With a 99 percent specificity for autism risk, such a test would still return false positives for 1 percent of the non-autistic population.

Our thanks the the-scientist.com for this article.

Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

Mandy asks…

Are some mental illnesses and disorders expressions of evolution at work?

Considering the pathetic state of human civilization, isn’t it safe to say that humans are not currently able to control — or, at least, focalize — their emotions in a practical manner enough to allow for survival? If so, wouldn’t it be painfully logical to accept and value much more those of us who are morally stable but labelled as intense, apathetic, peculiar, odd or asocial? I’m particularly interested in cluster A and B personality disorders along with autism spectrum disorders, seeing as none of them are psychotic or harmful and that they generally don’t perceive their disorders as problematic — only other people do, which is what actually leads to these individuals’ distress in the first place.

Could it be that these conditions are actually further evolutionary steps towards solidifying and maximizing the (conscious and evolutionary recent) frontal cortices’ grip over the impulses of the (unconscious and evolutionary outdated) limbic system?

If so, would it not be important to try shifting society around for the benefit of those who predispose us towards evolutionary progress — to start valuing self-control, intelligence, creativity and independence over mindless conformity?

Philosophically speaking, would it be best, as a society, to cull the weak in order to preserve natural selection or, rather, to begin consciously engineering survival according to our needs?

My own opinion clearly transpires through these questions but I’ll be reading your responses (if any) with as open a mind as possible and let the community decide whichever deserves to be selected as the best answer. Please do share any of your thoughts and reactions as there is no specific question.

Once again, thank you all for your time and inputs.

admin answers:

I’m sure you have an idea of how psychotic we have become. Imagination has spawn us into a labyrinth of false beliefs and this awkward pursuit of happiness. I’m not sure what you mean by focalization of emotions.. Greed and dominance is the evolutionary process and the main direction for our outcome.. Or failure.. Whatever. Big bucks in the woods always want more does; same difference “humans”. If you go back to square one and wipe out all the BS that we’ve developed through this “mental evolution” of civilization as of now.. Getting rid of all the weight. Our primary goal is to survive, hunt, and survive more. Somewhere along the line, someone with an ability to recognize or with “special” features, finally understood and had the ability to teach a simple task and understood the ability for another to learn. These spikes in the evolutionary chain of greatness towards a particular affected region of the brain often open a gateway towards understanding the present.. Much better than those of us who often times forget what the present actually is. Reversing all knowledge and clutter, these spikes are not permanent but over-developments of the so system you mention. Exposure to the special under the correct understanding could open an ability to recognize a greater ability in one’s self.. We just can’t understand it yet and only exposure to those “special” people, hold the key.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Mary asks…

Does anybody know any friendship groups for adults with Asperger’s Syndrome?

Okay so somebody told me that there is a support group or whatever for people with Asperger‘s Syndrome. Do you know of a such thing?

admin answers:

There are good forums for people with Asperger’s syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders at http://www.wrongplanet.net

There you can talk to other adults who have it. I have found those forums very useful.

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Question?: Adhd Test

Ken asks…

How can you tell if an autistic child is also ADHD?

I have an 8 yr old son who is autistic and ADHD also runs in my family. Basically it seems ADHD and some form of the autism spectrum does as my nieces and nephew had one or both and my daughter is ADHD with testing for aspergers goin on. How can I get my son tested for adhd since he is non-communicative?

admin answers:

ADHD is commonly misdiagnosed with people that have Asperger’s Syndrome. The theory isn’t the change of mind but the fact that an obsessive mind causes them to move onto other subjects. One thing will cause another thought and so forth. This is not ADHD but doctors are more interested in prescribing Ritalin since this is an income stream for them. I would tell your school and they can test him or I would call a psychologist that specializes in Autism Spectrum Disorders and they will diagnose.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Thomas asks…

How do you know if a child has mild autism ?

My friend has a 5 yr old son who can say a few words then cuts of into bable. She doesn’t talk “baby talk” to him. When she wants to get his attention he avoids eye contact by rolling his eyes in every direction. When we took him to the fair certain noise would bother him and he would cover his ears. The noise didn’t even have to be high pitched or very loud. When she asked the doctor about his speech, he simply said it was a speech impediment that once he starts school he will get help for it. I’m not sure how to approach her about it either.

admin answers:

DON’T WAIT UNTIL HE STARTS SCHOOL!

Early intervention is key in cases of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Nonverbal Learning Disorder, and delayed speech.

Please ask her to take the following steps immediately:

Find a pediatrician that specializes in children with developmental disabilities.

Contact the school system for a complete evaluation (this is free, and could have been before the child trained 3!).

The school system will choose a team of professionals to evaluate the child, including, but not limited to a speech therapist, an occupational therapist, a physical therapist, a school adjustment counselor, a school psychologist, a teacher and an expert in special education. His parents will be part of the team, and they may bring any experts they so choose to the team meetings.

The child’s new pediatrician will submit a recommendation for the services the child needs. The child may require an independent evaluation by additional specialists (pediatric neurologist, etc. To develop a treatment plan.

Make sure that the team adopts the recommendations of his pediatrician and specialists in their entirety; appeal the team’s decision, if necessary.

The team will develop an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies the services to be provided and the frequency of the provision, as well as the modifications that will be made to “regular” education to accommodate him.

His parents have the right to accept or reject the IEP, in whole or in part, and appeal same, in whole or in part. If they choose to appeal and another, independent evaluation is required, the school must pay for the evaluation.

The school system is required BY LAW to provide early intervention services beginning at age 3, so he will probably begin in a special program, immediately.

This is a very complex subject not easily dealt with in this forum, however the above is a start. DON’T WAIT!

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Joseph asks…

What’s the diffference between neurofeedback and biofeedback?

And which is better for treating mental disorders?

admin answers:

Actually, Neurofeedback is a very specific type of Biofeedback according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurofeedback
“Neurofeedback… Is a type of biofeedback that uses realtime displays of electroencephalography to illustrate brain activity, often with a goal of controlling central nervous system activity.”

I also points out “The most common and well-documented use of neurofeedback is in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder…” and “Other areas where neurofeedback has been researched include treatment of substance abuse, anxiety, depression, epilepsy, OCD, learning disabilities, bipolar disorder, conduct disorder, cognitive impairment, migraines, headaches, chronic pain, autism spectrum disorders, sleep dysregulation, PTSD and concussion.”

On the flip side, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofeedback points out that “Biofeedback is the process of becoming aware of various physiological functions…” In other words, Biofeedback is for more physiological issues whereas Neurofeedback is more for the brain/mental side of it. Good luck and I hope I helped!

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Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

Helen asks…

Are some mental illnesses and disorders expressions of evolution at work?

Considering the pathetic state of human civilization, isn’t it safe to say that humans are not currently able to control — or, at least, focalize — their emotions in a practical manner enough to allow for survival? If so, wouldn’t it be painfully logical to accept and value much more those of us who are morally stable but labelled as intense, apathetic, peculiar, odd or asocial? I’m particularly interested in cluster A and B personality disorders along with autism spectrum disorders, seeing as none of them are psychotic or harmful and that they generally don’t perceive their disorders as problematic — only other people do, which is what actually leads to these individuals’ distress in the first place.

Could it be that these conditions are actually further evolutionary steps towards solidifying and maximizing the (conscious and evolutionary recent) frontal cortices’ grip over the impulses of the (unconscious and evolutionary outdated) limbic system?

If so, would it not be important to try shifting society around for the benefit of those who predispose us towards evolutionary progress — to start valuing self-control, intelligence, creativity and independence over mindless conformity?

Philosophically speaking, would it be best, as a society, to cull the weak in order to preserve natural selection or, rather, to begin consciously engineering survival according to our needs?

My own opinion clearly transpires through these questions but I’ll be reading your responses (if any) with as open a mind as possible and let the community decide whichever deserves to be selected as the best answer. Please do share any of your thoughts and reactions as there is no specific question.

Once again, thank you all for your time and inputs.
Our civilization is pathetic in the sense that it is destroying the ecosystem, still wages pointless wars, generates unnecessary suffering, populates far beyond the availability of resources and, of course, could very likely end up annihilating itself through nuclear warfare. Although we certainly do have the innate potential to change the status quo and live righteously, we are still currently faring much worse than every single species on Earth.

admin answers:

Well human civilization isn’t really that bad. The point is we are alive and in billions. Whatever we are doing it is working. Evolution doesn’t favor creativity, emotional stability, intelligence, or anything particularly good or bad, evolution only happens for things that are useful, and the easiest to obtain. It’s much easier and *immediately productive to be stronger and faster than it is to be smart.–It may simply be a fact for humans, for example, that minorities, such as blacks, have high crime rates because their minds, which aren’t nearly at the average intelligence and creativity of everybody else, simply see the host civilization, attach themselves to it, and steal/pillage and rape whatever they can get, because it works!! When they are on their own they are starving to death and riddled with disease.—-I personally think humanity should overstep the boundaries of evolution and cultivate our minds for their maximum intelligence.

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