Tag Archives: Autism Spectrum Disorder

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Donald asks…

Survey: How aware are you?

today is autism awareness day and all of april is autism awareness month i want to see how aware people actually are by asking afew questions
answer with what you honestly know if you want to look up the answers after you answer yours feel free to but not till you answer first

Question 1. what is meant by “autism spectrum” disorders?
2. What are sensory issues?
3 true or false if someone is not diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder by age 12 that means they dont have one.
4. true or false autism is very rare in girls
5.true or false autism spectrum disorders are obvious and you can tell right away if someone has autism
6. what is asperger’s syndrome?

bonus question: can you read this article then tell me your reaction and weather you learned anything new http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/05/dont-judge-a-mother-until-you-know-the-whole-story/
oh and for why its in this section is because i feel in my opinion part of being spiritual is being in tune with the world around us and understanding others (or atleast trying to understand others)

admin answers:

1. The autism spectrum consists of classical autism, Asperger’s syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and PDD-NOS. All these disorders involve social and communication issues in some way. The symptoms appear early in childhood and last throughout the lifetime.

2. Sensory issues are a common feature of autism spectrum disorders. Most frequently they are hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity, either in general or with specific stimuli. For example, I’m extremely sensitive to sound, and metal on metal is one sound in particular that’s painful for me. I’m hyposensitive to pain. Another common issue is difficulty filtering out background information, like music playing in the background. Sensitivity and filtering problems can lead to constant sensory overload.

3. False. The symptoms appear early on, but they aren’t necessarily caught early on. I wasn’t diagnosed with Asperger’s until I was 17.

4. False. It appears more common in boys, but the gender gap is actually a lot narrower. Girls are more likely to be misdiagnosed or undiagnosed for a variety of social and cultural reasons.

5. False. People with ASDs may not appear particularly unusual, or they may seem eccentric but not exactly autistic. If everyone could tell right away if someone had an ASD, mental health professionals are wasting their time with diagnostic evaluations!

6. Asperger’s is a mild form of autism. It’s very similar to HFA, but there’s no speech delay.

BQ: I liked the article. I think its meaning can apply to everyone – it’s important to not judge people right away, because you don’t know the whole story. What appears to be a poorly behaved child and an unconcerned mother is actually an overstimulated, anxious autistic child and a caring mother who’s trying to help him the best she can. Everyone has challenges that aren’t obvious from the outside, so it’s important to withhold judgment and keep an open mind, since there’s often more to a situation than meets the eye.

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Question?: Pdd Autism

Paul asks…

What is Autism exactly-I have an autistic sister?

I would like to understand her situation better. I don’t live with her so when ever I do see her (which is like maybe once every 5 months, if that) she’s a little hard to handle. She’s very hyper. And she’s got more problems other than just autism.

But what is autism exactly? I just want to understand my baby sister more.

admin answers:

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that begins at birth or within the first two-and-a-half years of life. Most autistic children are perfectly normal in appearance, but spend their time engaged in puzzling and disturbing behaviors which are markedly different from those of typical children. Less severe cases may be diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or with Asperger’s Syndrome (these children typically have normal speech, but they have many “autistic” social and behavioral problems).

It used to be thought that autism is just a fate that you accept.The good news is that there are now a wide variety of treatment options which can be very helpful. Some treatments may lead to great improvement, and others may have little or no effect, but a good starting point would be the parent ratings of biomedical interventions, which presents the responses of over 25,000 parents in showing the effectiveness of various interventions on their own child.

ARI’s Diagnostic Checklist, Form E-2, was developed by Dr. Bernard Rimland to diagnose children with Kanner’s syndrome (which is also known as ‘classical autism’). Many parents and professionals have also used the E-2 checklist to assist in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You can print out, complete the checklist, and then mail it to ARI for scoring. Our staff will analyze the responses and send you a score along with an interpretation. The checklist is available in 17 different languages. There is no charge for this service.

How Common is it? For many years autism was rare – occurring in just five children per 10,000 live births. However, since the early 1990’s, the rate of autism has increased exponentially around the world with figures as high as 60 per 10,000. Boys outnumber girls four to one. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control reported that 1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism.

What is the Outlook? Age at intervention has a direct impact on outcome–typically, the earlier a child is treated, the better the prognosis will be. In recent years there has been a marked increase in the percentage of children who can attend school in a typical classroom and live semi-independently in community settings. However, the majority of autistic persons remain impaired in their ability to communicate and socialize.

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CDC Data and Statistics that you may not know.

Hi, We have a new volunteer. Our first. Elizabeth Campion,  from the Shelby Township library here in Michigan. She is an expert at mining data, She did this as a sample of her work. Even I had not heard all these facts. I thank her for this work.

 

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION                                             DATA AND STATISTICS

 

AUTISM

About one in 88 children has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to estimates from CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network.

ASD’s are reported to occur in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.

ASD’s are almost five times more common among boys (1 in54) than among girls (1 in 252).

Studies in Asia, Europe, and North America have identified individuals with an ASD with an average prevalence of about 1%.  A recent study in South Korea reported a prevalence of 2.6%.

About one in 6 children in the U.S. had a developmental disability in 2006-2008, ranging from mild disabilities such as speech and language impairments to serious developmental disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, and autism.

 

RISK FACTORS AND CHARACTERISTICS

Studies have shown that among identical twins, if one child has an ASD, then the other will be affected about 36-95% of the time.  In non-identical twins, if one child has an ASD, then the other is affected about 0-31% of the time.

Parents who have a child with an ASD have a 2-18% chance of having a second child who is also affected.

ASDs tend to occur more often in people who have certain genetic or chromosomal conditions.  About 10% of children with autism are also identified as having Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, tubers sclerosis, and other genetic and chromosomal disorders.

The majority (62%) of children the ADDM Network identified as having ASDs did not have intellectual disability.

Children born to older parents are at a higher risk for ASDs.

A small percentage of children who are born prematurely or with low birth weight are at greater risk for having ASDs.

ASD commonly co-occurs with other developmental, psychiatric, neurologic, chromosomal and genetic diagnoses.  The co-occurrence of one or more non-ASD developmental diagnoses is 83%.  The co-occurrence of one or more psychiatric diagnoses is 10%.

Research has shown that a diagnosis of autism at age 2 can be reliable, valid and stable.

More children are being diagnosed at earlier ages – a growing number (18%) of them by age 3.  Still, most children are not diagnosed until after they reach age 4.  Diagnosis is a bit earlier for children with autistic disorder (4years) than for children with the more broadly-defined autism spectrum diagnoses (4 years, 5 months) and diagnosis is much later for children with Asperger Disorder (6 years, 3 months).

Studies have shown that parents of children with ASDs notice a developmental problem before their child’s first birthday.  Concerns about vision and hearing were more often reported in the first year, and differences in social, communication, and fine motor skills were evident from 6 months of age.

 

ECONOMIC COSTS

Individuals with an ASD had average medical expenditures that exceeded those without an ASD by $4,110-$6,200 per year.  On average, medical expenditures for individuals with an ASD were 4.1 – 6.2 times greater than for those without an ASD.  Differences in median expenditures ranged from $2,240 to $3,360 per year, with median expenditures 8.4 – 9.5 times greater.

In 2005, the average annual medical costs for Medicaid-enrolled children with an ASD were $10,709 per child, which was about six times higher than costs for children without an ASD ($1,812).

In addition to medical costs, intensive behavioral interventions for children with ASDs cost $40,000 to $60,000 per child per year.

Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Richard asks…

Is being in your own little world a part of autism?

I have autism spectrum disorder or aspergers syndrome and I am in my own little world most of the time. It distracts me form my learning I start thinking about star trek or videogames or something else. I wonder is this a part of AS? Because I can be looking at the teacher and daydreaming at the same time and not get the assignment. Are most kids with aspurgers syndrome in there own little worlds? How can I get out of there?

admin answers:

It’s quite common for people with autism spectrum disorders to be in their own world a lot, but not everyone on the autism spectrum is like that and some people who are not on the spectrum are in their own world too.

I think being in our own world a lot can probably be explained at least partly by our environment not being suitable for us. I have Asperger’s syndrome too and I’m in my own world most of the time and I seem to go there when there is either too little or too much stimuli in my environment. I go to my own world in attempt to regulate the stimuli to make it the way I need it to be.

When I was in school I was bored most of the time, because the things we were studying about were too easy for me, so I kept my mind busy by being in my own world a lot, dealing with something more challenging. When I felt lonely and didn’t really have any friends or family to feel close to, I went to my own world to spend time with imaginary, loving friends. At my current working place there is excessive sensory input and I go to my own world a lot to try to block out some of the sensory input and distractions around me. I don’t go to my own world when I’m in a good, suitable environment with an appropriate amount of challenges and sensory experiences and balanced emotions.

I’ve never really attempted to stop being in my own world, because I don’t consider it much of a problem, but I guess that if i wanted to, I’d try to do it by trying to make my environment more suitable somehow, for example by making sure I have something challenging and interesting to do, but a good sensory and emotional environment to do it in.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Robert asks…

has anyone heard of The Marcus Institute?

here in Ga. only (i think). they offer many different treatments for a great deal of developmental disorders,i.e., autism spectrum disorder,asbergers syndrome and many more.
i have my daughter Sierra involved with this program and i welcome any info or comments about this institute.

admin answers:

I have not heard of The Marcus Institute, but one you may want to check out is Dore Achievement Centers. Best of luck!

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Thomas asks…

Is ASD diffrent than autism what is it?

I am male and 16 and I was wondering what a ASD is because I have it but I heard that it was separate from autism and it had its own symptoms I was wondering what ASD relay means?

admin answers:

ASD means ‘autism spectrum disorder’

the spectrum includes
autism
pdd/nos (pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified)
asperger’s
rett’s
child hood disintegrative disorder

it means that there is a wide spectrum of conditions in the autism family…
High functioning autism, moderate autism, low functioning autism…..

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Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Sharon asks…

A question about genetics. I have a child with ?

PDD-NOS, which is an autism spectrum disorder. I’ve read that normally people have a 1 in 150 chance of having a child with autism, but it jumps up to 1 in 20 for people who already have an autistic child.

My question is, does anyone know what my chances would be of having a child with classic autism or Rett‘s syndrome? I’m not worried about having a child with PDD-NOS or Aspergers, but I do have concerns about having a child with classic autism.
Hi Sally! Last July my son had been checked for Fragile X since he not only has PDD, but also scored low on a few I.Q. tests and has hyper-flexibility in his joints. However, he was not found to have this condition. I thank God, because I was terrified.

He’s seeing the genetics counselor again next Monday (for what, I do not know) but when I had asked the doctor the question, I didn’t receive much more than an answer that I have around a 1 in 20 chance of having another child with an ASD, but wasn’t informed on the risk for having one with classic autism. I was just hoping that possibly someone here knew the risk.

admin answers:

Hi …I am not sure but i was told i ‘might’ have another child with autism if i were to have another baby, i know a lady who has three children two girls and a boy the two older girls both have autism one more severe than the other the boy doesn’t have problems, so i would say yes there is always a chance

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Question?: Autism Signs In Children

John asks…

What age did your child put together jigsaw puzzles?

My son is 4 and loves to put together 150-200 piece puzzles. He will sit for hours on end and focus only on his puzzle. He was treated for speech problems at age 2-3. Is this normal for a four year old to concentrate so long? Do you think he is on the autism spectrum? Thanks.

admin answers:

This one sign alone would not cause me to think he might be on the spectrum, although it is very unusual for a 4 year old to be interested in 200 pc puzzles for hours without wanting help/getting frustrated. I have an almost 5 year old who happens to be ahead of her peers intellectually, but she would NEVER spend hours on one puzzle. However, her sister who is 2 years younger and not nearly as ahead at this age, is MUCH better at puzzles than she is!

Have you googled it and looked for other signs of autism or autism spectrum disorder? I understand your concern, but he could just be a very cognitive little boy! Apparently, my brother was playing chess with my dad by age 5 and was very good at it! He’s not at all autistic, just very, very intelligent and very in to “mind” games (AKA the intellectual type). Maybe you just have a little “genius” on your hands!

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In 7 Year Old

Helen asks…

7 year old assumed to have autism then pervasive developmental and then aspergers?

7 year old assumed to have autism pervasive developmental and aspergers?
for 6 1/2 years my son was assumed to have these three illnesses.but when a genetic test was performed it disclosed no fragile x and normal chromosones.so when i called back to the pediatric neurologist from 5 years ago (July,2006) who said my son had autism and fragile x within a 10 minute hospital visit I was confused from what the genetic counselor 2 days ago.He was also told to have pdd( May2009)and August 2011 while in the psychiatric unit was said to aspergers.But from the genetic counselor I was told you have a normal child with a behavior problem that he might have inherited a gene from his father But because of your insurance limitation we cant further research because it will cost thousands of dollars so lets call it the last name aspergers’s.Then the pediatrician from the same hospital said well your son’s behavior is out of my league let’s call it autism spectrum disorder dont waste your money spending thousands of dollars to do further research.I don’t know what to as a mother who has tried every medication every early child intervention,4 public schools 2 0 3 psychiatrists and psychologists.The genetic counselor said well you didn’t know what the cards were going to deal me because I was a rape victim by this child father 2 times while was conceived and when the child was 4 years old .the father found out where I lived at.I explained to the genetic counselor what I seen in the 52 years old I also see in the child.even him resembling the father.I’m 37 years old and dont know what to do.I dont know what to call what my son has I dont like sugar coating.
1 day ago- 3 days left to answer.
Additional Details
My son will be 8 in Nov. he was classified individually by different doctors for autism ,aspergers and pdd.I only see one symptom of that is behavior.His MRI in August 2011 came back normal.
He has normal set of chromosones and no fragile x.I dont see a sensory problem.I’m trying to explain this to the schools from the genetic doctors results.I could have said nothing of the results,but I did .I feel I have to lie about the truth vs the untruth.
18 hours ago
.
BN you heard my cry here.I have tried to talk to American psychological association.They act like they are stumped by my question of autism.Even the school psychologist at the board of education brushed me off by saying what is I can do for you.Then I called the doctor today who said Pdd 2/12 years ago he claim he forgot what he diagnosed him with.then the pediatric neurologist keep putting her nurse on the phone to explain fragile x when there no fragile x in his genetic test.I got a feeling these think I am going to SUE THEM.I even called a church for the right direction to go!! My heart is broken .I have advocated for something that may not exist.
Medicaid is what I have for my son.That’s why no further testing can be done.So I was told just call it aspegers by the genetic doctor or autism by the pediatrician.

admin answers:

The label may not really matter, what does matter is that your son receives treatment that does fit his needs and I’d check to make sure they ran the CORRECT Fragile X test (in that case the label DOES matter with the advances being made in research, the health conditions associated with fragile X and how you work with a child with FX, i.e., one should never force eye contact). Many neurologist still run a chromosome or micorarray analysis to test for FX and those tests are not reliable, too many false negatives. If they ran the correct test they should have given you CGG repeats – if they didn’t then I’d retest him using the FMR1 DNA test (aka Southern Blot with PCR analysis). There is a very active FB group the Fragile X Files, that you may be interested in, you may find additional support for dealing with behavior. I recommend the resource below, the columns are excellent I’d also recommend following some of the clinical trials associated with Fragile X and Autism on a new med STX209 (Arbaclofen) it may be out on the market within a year or two.

Please feel free to connect with me directly if you like. (((Hugs)))

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Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Betty asks…

How will Asperger syndrome and PDD be Diagnosed in the future once the definition is Changed?

I heard that instead of 3 being diagnosed with High Functioning Autism (aspergers syndrome), PDD-NOS and Autistic disorder there will only be one type
but, what if the child have mild symptoms of Autism just like Aspergers, how will they be diagnosed? How will Aspergers syndrome and PDD-NOS be diagnosed differently under the dsm-5 if they have symptoms of an autism Spectrum disorder?

admin answers:

Actually there are currently 5 subtypes…also childhood disintegrative disorder and retts

instead of labeling by subtype–they will just use one label for all groups

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Must meet criteria A, B, C, and D:

A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across contexts, not accounted for by general developmental delays, and manifest by all 3 of the following:

1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity; ranging from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back and forth conversation through reduced sharing of interests, emotions, and affect and response to total lack of initiation of social interaction,

2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction; ranging from poorly integrated- verbal and nonverbal communication, through abnormalities in eye contact and body-language, or deficits in understanding and use of nonverbal communication, to total lack of facial expression or gestures.

3. Deficits in developing and maintaining relationships, appropriate to developmental level (beyond those with caregivers); ranging from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts through difficulties in sharing imaginative play and in making friends to an apparent absence of interest in people

B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. Stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (such as simple motor stereotypies, echolalia, repetitive use of objects, or idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Excessive adherence to routines, ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior, or excessive resistance to change; (such as motoric rituals, insistence on same route or food, repetitive questioning or extreme distress at small changes).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; (such as strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper-or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of environment; (such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, fascination with lights or spinning objects).

C. Symptoms must be present in early childhood (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities)

D. Symptoms together limit and impair everyday functioning.

Aspergers and PDDNOS CAN fit into this definition….instead of listing different types—there will just be one type…they won’t be diagnosed differently.

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