Tag Archives: Autism Patients

Question?: Treatment For Autism Medication

Chris asks…

What is the latest in the treatment of autism, and success rates?

This week (Apr. 14—2010), a girl got

lost in a FLA. swamp & was found alive.

She was described as having “autism-like” symptoms. That news story led to this question.
Heard this on the radio yesterday—

dannysfarm.com

they work with autism patients, and others with different developmental
conditions.

admin answers:

The treatment of autism is never just one sided. It takes the help of medications, therapy, dietary monitoring, communication therapy and possibly behaviorists for someone to function in todays society. Medications include Antidepressants (SSRI’s) and Benzodiazipines, basically to calm someone with autism so they can focus. I would suggest reading this

http://www.neurologychannel.com/autism/treatment.shtml

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Autism Treatment Options For Adolescents Are Not Supported By Evidence

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Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Mental Health
Article Date: 27 Aug 2012 – 11:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Autism Treatment Options For Adolescents Are Not Supported By Evidence
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According to a recent report, Vanderbilt University researchers say that current therapies used to treat adolescents with autism are not supported by evidence proving they are effective methods.

Melissa McPheeters, Ph.D., M.P.H., director of Vanderbilt’s Evidence-Based Practice Center and senior author of the report published by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) commented: “Overall, there is very little evidence in all areas of care for adolescents and young adults with autism, and it is urgent that more rigorous studies be developed and conducted.”

Zachary Warren, Ph.D., director of the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center’s Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Spectrum Disorders added:

“There are growing numbers of adolescents and adults with autism in need of substantial support. Without a stronger evidence base, it is very hard to know which interventions will yield the most meaningful outcomes for individuals with autism and their families.”

The researchers analyzed over 4,500 studies and re-evaluated 32 on methods of treatment for autism patients aged 13 to 30 – they were all published between January 1980 and December 2011.

Results of the study showed some evidence supporting the effectiveness of treatments in improving social skills and how the patients performed educationally in areas such as reading and vocabulary. However, these investigations were small and were not followed up.

Medical interventions were found to have a lack of supporting evidence in terms of effectiveness in treating young adults with a autism spectrum disorder. However, outcomes of treatment with antipsychotic medications for reducing aggressive and irritable behaviors were the most consistent. Side effects included weight gain and sedation.

Of the articles analyzed, only 5 of them tested vocational interventions, which all stated that this type of treatment may be beneficial for some patients, but all 5 studies showed flaws that made the researchers doubt the effectiveness of vocational interventions.

Pediatrics journal will publish the outcomes of the study on vocational interventions in their August 27 issue.

In the 1970s it was believed that autism only affected 1 in every 2000 kids, but now, in 2012, it is estimated to affect 1 in every 88 kids. The boy to girl ratio of autism is 5:1, which lowers their number to 1 in every 54 boys in the U.S. living with autism.

Julie Lounds Taylor, Ph.D., assistant professor of Pediatrics and Special Education and lead author commented: “With more and more youth with autism leaving high school and entering the adult world, there is urgent need for evidence-based interventions that can improve their quality of life and functioning.”

Written by Christine Kearney
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. “A Systematic Review of Vocational Interventions for Young Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders”
Julie Lounds Taylor, Melissa L. McPheeters, Nila A. Sathe, Dwayne Dove, Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, and Zachary Warren
Pediatrics, August 2012, doi:10.1542/peds.2012-0682 Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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Improving The Possibilities Of Curing Autism

Our medical science is not yet ready to wipe autism clean from our world. The real cause of autism remains unknown. Regretfully, our medical advancement has not shown any progress in bringing forth a cure for this severe disease. Autism is still affecting children all around the world and the most unfortunate thing is that, their parents have no clue of what they must do. Reason for this dilemma is the lack of awareness. The number of autism-affected children this year has increased a bit higher than the previous years.

Before starting a therapy process to cure autism, a child must go through a precise process of diagnosis, to determine the existence of the disease. If they are found to be affected by the disease, then they must be enrolled in the autism therapy. Doctors found out that, genetic disorder is one of the reasons of getting a neurological disease. Therefore, experts are trying to cure autism and other neurological diseases by starting treatment at the cellular level. However, not just medicines, autism patients suffer from psychological disorder; so, they need a series of therapy to get their social understanding skill improved. Experts and doctors suggest following a set of rules systematically to improve the possibilities of curing autism.

A medical checkup is important
According to world-renowned researchers and doctors of autism, a complete medical treatment is needed before starting any therapy to cure a neurological disease. There is no general treatment for autism patients, as each patient display different forms of symptoms in this disease. Fortunately, there is a pattern of treatment followed by doctors to cure autism.

Therapy comes next
Modern therapy for autism consists of medicine and exercises to improve the learning abilities of patients. A common problem seen in autism patients is their difficulty in understanding the spoken language. They also have problems to respond accordingly.

Therefore, they must be enrolled in to speech therapy at first. The Sensory Integration Therapy that improves the patient’s brain growth would follow this up with the increased flow of sensory information process.

Selecting school
An autism affected patient needs to be exposed in social environment. School helps them mingle with other students and understand emotions as well as develops their reasoning ability. However, they also need attention and care, more than students who are without the disease. So, find a school that is capable of providing all that the patient needs.

These are the rules that can develop a patient of autism and improve their learning skills naturally. So, keep yourself updated about news on how to cure autism and spread the knowledge among others too.

Annie Barrete is a well-known autism researcher and publisher. Her long search for a helpful Aid for Autism led her to be an expert in treating autism patients. She believes sharing knowledge can help people who are in distress.

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Are Benefits Of Antidepressants For Autism Overstated?

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Main Category: Autism
Article Date: 24 Apr 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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With autism on the rise and an increasing concern for parents, doctors have searched for ways to treat the problem. Repetitive and other behavioral traits associated with the syndrome can hold children back in school and put stress on family life. It seems, however, that using anti-depressants is not necessarily the best solution.

Analysis of five published articles and five unpublished completed trials is showing that serotonin receptor inhibitors (SRIs), generally used as anti depressants, have been over rated in terms of treating autism. The article, “Pharmacologic Treatment of Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence of Publication Bias”, is published by the The American Academy of Pediatrics.

The researchers used meta-analysis to discover that studies with positive results for treating autism with serotonin receptor inhibitors are more likely to be published than those showing negative or neutral results. All of the five published articles had positive results, whereas only one of the unpublished showed anti-depressants as affective, basically meaning the usefulness of the SRIs has been over estimated.

This creates a situation where doctors reach for the prescription book without having all the facts, and autism patients maybe taking drugs that are sometimes considered addictive, without any proven benefit. The studies that did show positive results showed only minor improvements, and the SRIs were far from the silver bullet.

Webmd quotes researcher Melisa Carrasco, PhD, a recent graduate of the neuroscience program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor:

“When we realized there were as many unpublished studies with data as there were published studies providing data, it was definitely a little frustrating … It makes you wonder what data is not available and how it could help us better treat kids.”

In total, the five studies with positive results that were published had little over twenty percent success rate in reducing repetitive behaviors. Researchers say that they believe many journals are reluctant to publish studies showing drugs do not work, moreover in the case of autism, which is such a hot-button issue. The results look even worse when the unpublished studies are taken into account, dropping to an average of only twelve percent. It is little beyond the margin of error say researchers, who state that the benefits of taking the SRIs maybe negligible.

Carrasco continues that :

“It definitely brings up a huge problem in this field. There’s really no umbrella organization that’s overseeing that everybody who gets funding to do these studies, that they go ahead and then report it publicly. This is not rigorously enforced. It makes you wonder if the reason why they didn’t get published is because they had negative results.”

While it’s true that doctors might give SRIs for other symptoms, such as preventing anxiety, there is definitely a lack of definitive proof that anti-depressants really help those with autism.

Written by Rupert Shepherd
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. “Pharmacologic Treatment of Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence of Publication Bias”
Melisa Carrasco, PhD, Fred R. Volkmar, MD, and Michael H. Bloch, MD, MS
Pediatrics, April 2012, doi: 10.1542/peds.2011-3285 Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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All Available Treatment Options Of Autism

How dreadful it would be if we couldn’t be able to speak out our feelings and thought? That’s what ‘autism’ does to you. Under the influence of this terrible neurological disorder, one’s mind and body stays under developed. Symptoms of this disease can be seen after first three years of a child’s life. It’s curable but information about it is scarce. There are several ways to cure autism as the experts believe. So, let’s talk about how it can be treated.

Effects of vitamins and nutrients

Doctors have many theories for the cause of Autism. Some believe the lack of vitamins and minerals like calcium, folic acid, iron, magnesium and chromium is the reason of this disorder. Therefore it has become a common practice to prescribe multivitamin or mineral nutrient supplements to kids who are suffering from this disease. It has been proven through many tests that, treating autism patients with vitamin and nutrition shows improvement in their learning, speaking and behavioral skills.

Oral medicines

It was first known as an experimental therapy but soon it proved to be one of the most efficient therapy to cure autism. As per the doctors, it should be given thrice a day with vitamin pills as support. The statistics say, that kids treated by this therapy show change in behavior in less than 4 days. They were less irritable and more responsive than before and this therapy is affordable too.

Stem Cell Therapy

In this therapy one’s own cell from bone marrow is used. Why stem cells? Well, because these cells are able to change into other cell types, they can travel faster to the damaged tissues and has the capability to merge with other cells. When injected, a stem cell travels to the damaged tissue location being attracted by the chemicals that damaged tissues release in the blood stream. Then it connects itself to the damaged tissue and transforms into the same tissue afterwards.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

This is the latest and most efficient therapy to cure autism. It is a process in which, the patient breathes pure oxygen at high atmospheric pressure. This high altitude does the trick as it forces more oxygen in one’s bloodstream and accelerates healing process. A few years earlier people didn’t even know its name but now, all the researches are giving the credibility to Hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

So, gone are the days to feel terrified of this disease, as we have Hyperbaric oxygen therapy by our side.

Kevin Halls is a well published and certified autism treatment specialist. He is a member of Autism Wisconsin and tries his best to treat his patients well. He has witnessed unbelievable recovery of his patients through hyperbaric treatment. Thus he is sharing his thoughts with us.

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Patterns Of Mutations In Autism Revealed By DNA Sequencing Consortium

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Genetics
Article Date: 08 Apr 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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It has long been recognized that autism runs in families, suggesting a substantial genetic component to the disease. Yet few genes have so far been identified and the underlying genetic architecture of autism – that is, how many genes contribute and to what extent they influence a person’s chances of developing the disorder – remains poorly understood.

Now, a consortium led by researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and six other organizations has taken a step toward addressing these questions by searching for mutations in the fraction of the human genome that codes for proteins. The researchers sequenced this region, known as the “exome,” in 175 autism patients and their unaffected parents, looking for single-letter DNA changes present only in the children. Their results, along with simultaneously published findings from two other research groups, suggest modest roles for hundreds of genes in the development of autism and pinpoint a few specific genes as genuine risk factors. The work is described in a paper that appears online in the journal Nature.

“Autism, like many heritable disorders, results from the action of many genes – not simply a single gene as in cystic fibrosis or Huntington’s disease,” said senior author Mark Daly, chief of the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit at MGH, a senior associate member of the Broad Institute and co-director of its Program in Medical and Population Genetics, and a member of the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research. “These genes hold key insights into the true biological causes of autism – insights we have been unable to gain through other lines of research.”

Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social, behavioral, and communication abilities. Compared to other complex diseases, which are caused by a complicated mix of genetic, environmental, and other factors, autism is highly heritable – genetics accounts for roughly 80-90% of the risk of developing autism. Yet the majority of autism cases cannot be attributed to known inherited causes.

Researchers in the ARRA Autism Sequencing Collaborative (AASC) – formed by researchers from the Broad Institute, MGH, Baylor College of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, University of Pennsylvania, Carnegie Mellon University, and University of Pittsburgh – used massively parallel sequencing to help shed light on the genes that influence autism risk. Concordant findings from separate studies by two other groups, from Yale University and the University of Washington respectively, also appear in Nature.

The AASC team focused its attention on a particular set of mutations, specifically single-letter mutations that are not present in the parents’ DNA but instead appeared spontaneously in the children – so-called de novo point mutations. Although it is not yet clear exactly when these changes arise, such genetic variations tend to be rare but also more severe in their impact on gene function. With such extreme effects, they can serve as important signposts toward genes involved in autism.

“The idea is that these de novo mutations can help identify candidate genes much more precisely because a newly arisen point mutation is considered really strong evidence that the mutation – and the gene it resides in – is involved in autism,” said first author Benjamin Neale, a research affiliate at the Broad Institute and an assistant in genetics at MGH.

The researchers found that less than half of the autism cases studied carried a potentially protein-altering de novo point mutation. While this was only slightly higher than the number expected based on the rate of mutation in the general population, these events are sufficiently rare that they could be used to uncover specific risk genes.

“These data suggest that there is a role for de novo point mutations in the coding region of the genome for autism, but they do not constitute a sufficient cause,” said Neale. “That is to say, most de novo variants do not fully explain the disorder in an individual.”

To learn more about these mutations and the genes in which they reside, the scientists looked for any meaningful connections among them. Such connections, among different proteins for example, might reveal important biological networks or pathways that underlie autism. By mining these data, Daly, Neale, and their colleagues found that the mutated genes are more connected to each other and to previously identified autism genes than expected. Specifically, the results suggest that some of the proteins encoded by these genes physically interact with each other.

As described in their paper, Daly and his colleagues pooled their data with those published in the other two Nature papers, revealing 18 candidate genes with multiple functional de novo point mutations. Considering the severity of the mutations, the collective results pointed to three genes as strong autism candidates: KATNAL2, a gene whose function is unknown; SCN2A, which encodes a brain protein that forms a channel for sodium ions; and CHD8, a gene that regulates gene transcription and modifies chromatin (the network of proteins that surrounds DNA).

The AASC team used additional exome sequencing of nearly 1000 autism cases and as many controls to validate these findings and uncovered strong evidence supporting two of the three candidate genes, KATNAL2 and CHD8. Together, the genes help explain less than one percent of the genetic risk of autism.

“These results clearly demonstrate the potential of DNA sequencing to articulate specific risk factors for autism,” said Daly. “We have only scratched the surface, but with continued collaborative efforts, these gene discoveries will point us to the underlying biological roots of autism.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The research described in the Nature paper was supported by ARRA funding from the National Human Genome Research Institute and the National Institute of Mental Health.
Paper cited:
Neale et al. Patterns and rates of exonic de novo mutations in autism spectrum disorders. Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature11011
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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Identification Of Gene Expression Abnormalities In Autism

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Genetics
Article Date: 23 Mar 2012 – 2:00 PDT

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A study led by Eric Courchesne, PhD, director of the Autism Center of Excellence at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has, for the first time, identified in young autism patients genetic mechanisms involved in abnormal early brain development and overgrowth that occurs in the disorder. The findings suggest novel genetic and molecular targets that could lead to discoveries of new prevention strategies and treatment for the disorder.

The study published in PLoS Genetics uncovered differences in gene expression between brain tissue from young (2 to14 years old) and adult individuals with autism syndrome disorder, providing important clues why brain growth and development is abnormal in this disorder.

Courchesne first identified the link between early brain overgrowth and autism in a landmark study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in 2003. Next, he tested the possibility that brain overgrowth might result from an abnormal excess of brain cells. In November 2011, his study, also published in JAMA, discovered a 67 percent excess of brain cells in a major region of the brain, the prefrontal cortex – a part of the brain associated with social, communication and cognitive development.

“Our next step was to see whether there might be abnormalities of genetic functioning in that same region that might give us insight into why there are too many cells and why that specific region does not develop normally in autism,” said Courchesne.

In the new study, the researchers looked towards genes for answers, and showed that genetic mechanisms that normally regulate the number of cortical neurons are abnormal. “The genes that control the number of brain cells did not have the normal functional expression, and the level of gene expression that governs the pattern of neural organization across the prefrontal cortex is turned down. There are abnormal numbers and patterns of brain cells, and subsequently the pattern is disturbed,” Courchesne said. “This probably leads to too many brain cells in some locations, such as prefrontal cortex, but perhaps too few in other regions of cortex as well.”

In addition, the scientists discovered a turning down of the genetic mechanisms responsible for detecting DNA defects and correcting or removing affected cells during periods of rapid prenatal development.

Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings in the brain at young ages have remained largely unknown. Until now, few studies have been able to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotype variation in the brains of young patients with autism, especially in regions such as the prefrontal cortex that display the greatest growth abnormality.

Scientists – including co-first authors Maggie Chow, PhD, and Tiziano Pramparo, PhD, at UC San Diego – identified abnormal brain gene expression patterns using whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations from 33 autistic and control postmortem brain samples. They found evidence of dysregulation in the pathways that govern cell number, cortical patterning and cell differentiation in the young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, in adult patients with autism, the study found that this area of the brain shows dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways.

“Our results indicate that gene expression abnormalities change across the lifespan in autism, and that dysregulated processes in the developing brain of autistic patients differ from those detected at adult ages,” said Courchesne. “The dysregulated genetic pathways we found at young ages in autism may underlie the excess of neurons – and early brain overgrowth – associated with this disorder.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Additional contributors include co-senior authors Nicholas J. Schork, PhD, biostatistician at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA, and Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, professor of pediatrics at UC San Francisco; Mary E. Winn and Sarah Murray, The Scripps Research Institute; Lauren Weiss and Haim Belinson, UC San Francisco; Jian-Bing Fan and Craig April, Illumina, Inc.; Cynthia Carter Barnes, Hai-Ri Li and Xiang-Dong Fu, UC San Diego.
The research was supported by funds from the Simons Foundation, The Peter Emch Family Foundation, Autism Speaks, the Thursday Club Juniors and the UCSD-NIH Autism Center of Excellence.
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Asperger Syndrome

Asperger syndrome was named after Dr. Hans Asperger, who is credited for discovering the disorder. Dr. Asperger referred to the autistic children he studied as “little professors” because,instead of having significantly delayed skills, they displayed highly developed intellectual functioning.

In children with this pervasive developmental disorder, language, curiosity, and cognitive development proceed normally while there is substantial delay in social interaction and“development of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, and activities.”

Persons suffering from Asperger generally function better in verbal, linguistic performance than in visual, three-dimensional and motor skills. This is in contrast to people with the classic form of autism.

Patients suffering from Asperger have normal speech development. This does not imply that communication is normal. It is characteristic that speech is often interpreted concretely. They will enter into lengthy discussions, introducing the most illogical arguments and succeed in talking the hind leg off a donkey. This often applies to people with a normal to supernormal intelligence who are motor disabled and have limitations under an ‘autism disorder.’

Those with Asperger often suffer a greater degree of difficulty being accepted in normal social situations because they are intellectually normal, but have unusual behaviors. Therefore, they’re sometimes labeled as “odd” or “eccentric” rather than as individuals with a real medical disorder.

A short review of some distinguishing Asperger syndrome characteristics:

•Lack of imagination
While they often excel at learning facts and figures, people with Asperger syndrome find it hard to think in abstract ways. This can cause problems for children in school where they may have difficulty with particular subjects such as literature or religious studies.

•Special interests
People with Asperger syndrome often develop an almost obsessive interest in a hobby or collecting. Usually their interest involves arranging or memorizing facts about a particular subject, such as train timetables, Derby winners or the dimensions of cathedrals.

•Love of routines
People with Asperger syndrome often find change upsetting. Young children may impose their routines upon their families, such as insisting on always walking the same route to school. At school, sudden changes, such as a correction to the timetable, may upset them.People with Asperger syndrome often prefer to order their day according to a set pattern.
If they work set hours, any unexpected delay, such as a traffic hold-up or a late train, can make them anxious or distressed.

People with Asperger syndrome exhibit autistic characteristics like obsessive behaviors or lack of social and communication skills. Like all ASDs, the level and severity of these signs will vary from person to person.

Asperger syndrome has been diagnosed more often during the last few years and has obtained its own place in the DSM-IV. The idea that the Asperger syndrome is only found in persons with a normal to supernormal intelligence is under discussion.

Uta Frith, an authority in the field of Asperger, is concerned about the fact that Asperger may be prone to over-diagnosis. Not everybody showing clumsiness in making contact with others or behaving strangely is suffering from Asperger.

Another danger is caused by the phenomenon that many people seem to indicate famous scientists or artists may have suffered Asperger. Names like Newton and Einstein are offered as proof that Asperger is a mild form of autism bordering on genius.
Asperger, however, is not a mild form of autism. Although many people suffering Asperger are able to cope well with the help of friends, family or a partner, others are prone to develop other disorders like an anxiety disorder or depression.

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Autism Ribbons Increases Awareness

We are living in societies, where we need to interact and communicate with people. We have certain responsibilities towards our society. You will see that there are many people, who are suffering from different kinds of diseases and are living extremely painful lives. You will see that diseases like cancer, HIV Aids and a number of such horrifying diseases have brought in darkness, in the lives of people. Similarly, the misery through which autism patients are going through has really brought people in the gloomy state of their lives. Autism is one of those diseases, through which children are suffering since many years. The symptoms of this disease start to become visible, when the child reaches at the age of 2 to 3 years old. Doctors have not been able to know any kind of permanent treatment for this disease, but they have been giving certain kind of therapies and medications, which helps in keeping this disease under control.

The treatment for autism is very expensive. Autism patients, who belong from well-off families, can afford to undergo from autism treatments, but poor patients cannot afford to bear such expenses. For all such patients, many charitable organizations are contributing their generous efforts. These organizations are using different ways of collecting and generating funds. Selling of fundraising merchandises is one of the most successful ways of collecting donations and funds from a larger segment of the society. Ribbons of different colors are being attached to different kinds of accessories and garments, which highlight the fundraising for specific causes. Autism ribbons are used to highlight the cause of raising funds for autism and for the patients of asperger syndrome.

All those people, who want to donate money, in order to help the patients of autism and asperger syndrome, they can purchase different things like bracelets and bangles, which have autism ribbon attached to them or engraved or can also purchase autism magnets, which they can use on their refrigerators or in cars, which will help in spreading awareness regarding to autism ribbons.

Autism awareness ribbon has acted perfectly in making people aware of their responsibilities towards their societies. Now more and more people are pushing those things, which come with autism ribbons attached to them. The aim of selling fundraising merchandises is to say thanks to those people, who donate money to charities, which is utilized in the treatment of patients, suffering from different diseases. There are thought provoking words printed on beautiful bracelets and bangles, which say thanks, help, love and care. These words leave an unmemorable impression on the hearts of the people, who donate money and in this way they keep themselves attached with such noble causes and activities. If you also want to show humane and generous behavior, towards autism and asperger syndrome patients, then you must purchase those items, which have autism ribbons imprinted or attached with them. In this way you will get to live with a feeling of satisfaction and contentment, for you have also helped the needy segment of the society.

http://www.fundraisingforacause.com is a fundraising organization for different causes, help us to spread awareness in the world with autism ribbons and autism awareness ribbon. We hope you have enjoyed this article.

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What Are the Symptoms of Down Syndrome and Asperger Syndrome?

Down syndrome occurs in a person when an extra replicate of the 21st chromosomes exist. This type of Down syndrome is termed Trisomy 21. The extra 21st chromosome causes problems with the development of the body and the brain. This condition is the most usual cause of congenital birth defects. Asperger syndrome is frequently identified as a high-functioning type of autism. Patients with this type of syndrome experience difficulty in socializing, repetitive behaviors, and clumsiness. Motor skills development can be deferred.

 

Asperger syndrome was once called autistic psychopathy by Hans Asperger in 1944. The accurate origin of this condition is still not known. More likely, an irregularity in the brain causes this syndrome. Autism is possibly linked to genetic or familial factors. A particular gene is not identified yet. The syndrome emerges to be more typical in males than in females. a lot of them posses an above-average intelligence quotient even though patients with Asperger syndrome frequently have problems with socialization. These patients may perform extremely well in certain field, such as science and computer programming. There is no evident delay in the development of their cognitive abilities. The capacity to perform their activities of daily living is not altered.

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Down syndrome manifestations differ from one person to another and can vary from mild to serious. Nevertheless, patients with Down syndrome may have an extensively distinct appearance. The head of the patient may be smaller than usual and irregularly shaped. For instance, the head can be round with a flat portion on the back surface. The innermost cantus of the eyes can be pear-shaped instead of pointed.

 

Frequent physical manifestations include excess skin at the nape, flattened nose, reduced muscle tone during birth, and small ears. Patients with this syndrome also have a single crease in the palm and in the sole, upward slanting eyes, white spots, termed as Brushfield spots, on the iris or the colored portion of the eye. Physical development is frequently sluggish than normal. Most patients with this syndrome never attain their normal adult height. Patients may as well have delays in social and mental development. Common difficulties may involve poor judgment, short attention span, slow learning abilities, and impetuous behavior. They can be aware of their limitations as the patient mature physically. They can as well feel anger and frustration because of their incapacities.

 

Patients with Asperger syndrome become over-attentive or obsessed on one topic or object, disregarding all others. These patients want to know all about the particular topic. They may present various facts about their object f interest, other than that there will be no conclusion or end point. They frequently cannot distinguish that the other person has lost concern with the topic. Their areas of interest can be reasonably narrow like a fascination with phone books, train schedules, hoarding of objects, or a vacuum cleaner. People with this syndrome do not withdraw themselves from reality. They frequently approach other people. Nevertheless, their difficulties with language and speech in a social situation frequently lead to seclusion. They converse in a monotone, and cannot respond to the comments of other people.

For more information on Different Types of Diseases, Symptoms and Diagnoses, Please visit: Down Syndrome, Asperger Syndrome and Symptoms of Fibromyalgia.
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