Tag Archives: Autism Children

Question?: Autism Signs In Children

Sandra asks…

What can cause a child to be excited only by bright lights in night time streets, to have no interest in, or?

liking for their immediate environment or the people in it, apart from their family, and to think the world is a big and mysterious place, and want to get out into it? Is this a form of Autism?

admin answers:

Probably not autism if the kid is differentially interested in family members. Possibly these are signs of hyperactivity deficit disorder, but if this is a young child it’s probably a symptom of being a young child whose forebrain is still developing, along with the capacity for neocortical control of behavior.

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Maternal Antibodies Linked to Autism

Some children with autism are born to mothers carrying antibodies that bind to proteins involved in brain development.
By Ed Yong | July 9, 2013 http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/36379/title/Maternal-Antibodies-Linked-to-Autism/

In 2008, Judy van de Water from the University of California, Davis, discovered a group of autoantibodies—those that trigger immune responses against the body’s own molecules—that are especially common in mothers of children with autism. Now, her team has identified what these antibodies bind to: six proteins involved in varied aspects of brain development. By crossing the placenta and affecting these proteins in a fetus’s brain, the maternal antibodies could increase the risk of developmental problems in some cases of autism, according to the new research, published today (July 9) in Translational Psychiatry.

“I cannot laud these authors enough,” said Andrew Zimmerman, a neurologist from the Kennedy Krieger Institute, who has also been studying maternal antibodies but was not involved in this study. “Given that, at present, only between 15 and 20 percent of children with autism have known causes—mainly genetic and infectious mechanisms—this will be a major advance.”

Van de Water’s team, led by graduate student Dan Braunschweig, is now using their discovery to develop a test that predicts a child’s risk of developing autism spectrum disorders based on the mother’s antibodies. “It would allow mothers to plan,” said van de Water, by enrolling their children in educational programs that promote social skills from an early age.

The antibody hypothesis would only apply to a quarter of autism cases at most, but van de Water said that it is valuable for affected parents to get some clues about the biology behind their children’s condition. “It provides some answers,” she said. “They couldn’t have done anything about this—it’s not like they did anything to cause the antibodies. But as a parent, you just want to know what happened so you can move forward.”

The proteins that the team identified have a wide variety of roles. STIP1 influences the creation of new neurons, for example, while cypin affects the number of branches they have. CRMP1 and CRMP2 stop neurons from growing and determine their length. YBX1 is involved in gene transcription, as well as neural migration during development. Finally, LDH is the most mysterious of the sextet but is also the most strongly linked to autism. Earlier studies suggest that it may play a role in metabolism or in responses to viruses or toxins.

All six are highly expressed in the fetal brain. Of 246 mothers with children living with autism, 23 percent had antibodies that recognized two or more of these proteins, compared to just 1 percent of 149 mothers with normally developing children. The antibodies have more than 99 percent specificity for autism risk, which means that they have less than a 1 in a 100 chance of finding a false positive.

Meanwhile, the team’s colleagues Melissa Bauman and David Amaral, also from UC Davis, injected eight pregnant rhesus monkeys with antibodies purified from mothers with autistic children. These monkeys were more protective towards their young during their first 6 months, compared to those that were injected with antibodies from women with neuro-typical children. As the young monkeys grew up, they showed unusual social behavior: compared to typical macaques, they were more likely to approach both familiar peers and strangers, even when their advances weren’t rewarded with sustained social interactions.

“Moving this to monkeys is a big step,” said Paul Patterson, a neuroimmunologist from the California Institute of Technology, who was not involved in the work. “This very careful behavioral study shows that at least some of the antibodies do have an effect on fetal brain development.”

Betty Diamond, an immunologist at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, agrees the studies represent “an important step forward.” However, she noted that antibodies often bind to many possible targets, and the proteins that the team identified may not be the relevant ones. She also said that some of the alleged target proteins are found within cells, “and it is not clear how or whether the antibodies can penetrate developing neurons.”

Zimmerman added, “Much work remains to be done to show how these antibodies are relevant, how they affect fetal brain development, and what factors lead some mothers to develop these antibodies.”

The team is now working to address these issues, trying to identify the specific parts of the six proteins that the antibodies stick to, determine how they affect the developing brain, and understand how they might be used to predict autism risk. Van de Water and Amaral are consulting for Pediatric Bioscience, which is creating a predictive test based on the results.

“The next step is to come up with a therapeutic to block the antibodies—not just to pick them up, but to do something about it,” said van der Water. Although the concept of preventing autism can be controversial, she points out that her panel of antibodies seem to correlate with the most severe symptoms and language problems.

Still, she is treading cautiously. “The parents have been surprisingly supportive,” she said. “But the autism field has been fraught with false alarms, so we want to be really careful.”

D. Braunschweig et al., “Autism-specific maternal autoantibodies recognize critical proteins in developing brain,” Translational Psychiatry, 3:e277, 2013.

M.D. Bauman et al., “Maternal antibodies from mothers of children with autism alter brain growth and social behaviour development in the rhesus monkey,” Translational Psychiatry, 3:e278, 2013.

Clarification (July 10): This story has been updated from its original version, which included this quote in relation to a potential test: “If it’s positive, their risk is virtually 100 percent”. With a 99 percent specificity for autism risk, such a test would still return false positives for 1 percent of the non-autistic population.

Our thanks the the-scientist.com for this article.

Question?: Autism Signs In Children

John asks…

What age did your child put together jigsaw puzzles?

My son is 4 and loves to put together 150-200 piece puzzles. He will sit for hours on end and focus only on his puzzle. He was treated for speech problems at age 2-3. Is this normal for a four year old to concentrate so long? Do you think he is on the autism spectrum? Thanks.

admin answers:

This one sign alone would not cause me to think he might be on the spectrum, although it is very unusual for a 4 year old to be interested in 200 pc puzzles for hours without wanting help/getting frustrated. I have an almost 5 year old who happens to be ahead of her peers intellectually, but she would NEVER spend hours on one puzzle. However, her sister who is 2 years younger and not nearly as ahead at this age, is MUCH better at puzzles than she is!

Have you googled it and looked for other signs of autism or autism spectrum disorder? I understand your concern, but he could just be a very cognitive little boy! Apparently, my brother was playing chess with my dad by age 5 and was very good at it! He’s not at all autistic, just very, very intelligent and very in to “mind” games (AKA the intellectual type). Maybe you just have a little “genius” on your hands!

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Question?: Treatment For Autism In Adults

Chris asks…

Society is concerned with children who have Autism, but is there not enough attention to children whose parent?

or parents might have Autism? Would this greatly affect the children’s upbringing, if a parent had Autism, which was undiagnosed, and caused them to act strangely

admin answers:

Society does not pay enough attention to adults with autism, period. Adults with autism are a forgotten and underserved group, as if people think autistic individuals grow out of it or disappear from the surface of earth when they reach adulthood. Diagnosis, treatment, research, articles, educational material etc. Is pretty much all focused on children with autism and their parents.

Many autistic adults are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed and some have been diagnosed in adulthood but still have nowhere to turn for help.

Some of those adults have children and some of them do not. Some of those who are parents have done a good job raising their kids, with or without support from others, and some have not been able to handle it as well. Autism varies so much between individuals that the upbringing by parents with autism varies a lot too. I know a few (diagnosed) adults with high functioning autism who have children and are doing a fine job raising them. I’m sure that there exist others who don’t deal with it as well though and I’m not sure what (if anything) is being done about that.

While the upbringing of children whose parents have autism may not necessarily be affected in a negative way, I do think society should pay more attention to it and be more prepared and willing to help if necessary. I think there is need for more supportive services for adults with autism, both those who are parents and those who are not.

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Question?: Autism Signs In Older Children

Michael asks…

How do you determine a learning disability?

Is it based on IQ and if so how is this tested if a child is non verbal. We are getting our official diagnosis of our son next week and know it will be severe autism and learning disability. We can choose to accept or not the diagnosis, I agree with the autism one but how can a learning disability diagnosis be secure in a 3.5 yr old if he doen’t speak.

admin answers:

Learning disabilities are generally broken down into four major categories including spoken language, written language, arithmetic, and reasoning. Because one cannot ‘see’ a learning disability, it is often called the ‘hidden disability.’ This makes assessment somewhat more difficult to determine and often leaves many individuals with learning disabilities to suffer in silence and isolation.

Learning disabilities typically originate in childhood and if identified early, parents and teachers can use various interventions to help the child cope with his or her disability. Some important signals that parents can look for that may be a sign of a learning disability include: difficulty understanding and/or following directions; poor memory; failure to master major milestones in scholastic development on time (i.e. Reading, math, writing) usually resulting in poor performance in school, problems with reversing letters and/or numbers, lack of hand-eye-movement coordination, and other behaviours that seem out of the ordinary when considering the child’s age and developmental stage.
It will be hard for you to consider the following but it is very important: forget about stigma; later you will need to claim DLA and Mobility; a diagnosis of Autism on its own won’t guarantee this but a double diagnosis will make it easier.
You will know your own child and any medical diagnosis will not change that but it may make life easier in the future.

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Question?: Autism Signs And Symptoms

David asks…

Do children with autism have a bigger shaped head?

I am researching autism in children under 3 right now. My friend and I have been discussing my son. We believe, my son is showing signs of autism. My friend said he has autistic children in his family and those children have big heads. Like rounder in the back of the head.

Does anyone know if this is typical in autism?

admin answers:

It’s typical of autism.

Http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071208092451.htm

In fact, all children who suffer severe stress in early infancy–premature birth, caesarean birth, surgery or severe illness shortly after birth, etc– experience rapid neuronal overgrowth.

The big exception is a supposed form of autism called “Rett Syndrome” where one of the symptoms is microcephaly.
Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rett_syndrome

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder In Children

Betty asks…

Why is children’s mental health so widely disagreed on?

EAch doctor see something else, labels it one thing (adhd) another doctor says aspenger (low spectrum autism) another bipolar, another odd or conduct disorder. all with the same titles and education. How do you ever really know what is wrong with your child? And how do you make sure your child is getting the correct treatment is the diagnose is so different?
Is their a test that can watch brain activity, to see if something is wrong with the way a brain is suppose to work?

admin answers:

Diagnosing a mental illness is often very difficult, because there are so many variables, especially with children. With children under 18 some behavior is appropriate at one age but then most out grow it. Mental health issues are NOT an exact science like most or at leastt many physical illnesses.
Occasionallyy there are blood test or MRI but not usually. And let face it with younger children they often have some trouble expressing how they are feeling.
As far as the best diagnosis, I would go to the best psychiatrist that you can find, one that specializes in children- youchild’sd’s age. I would not take a child to a general pract. For a psych. Evaluation-they just do not have enough experience or training to stick a label on your child for life. Most doctors are reluctant to give a BiPolar diagnosis until well past 18 yrs. If I can answer any other specific questions please email me. God Bless REGGIE

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Children

Thomas asks…

What are the chances of us having an autistic child?

My husband’s niece has Asperger Syndrome. Are the chances higher than average for us to have a baby with AS or autism?

admin answers:

There are a few different spectrums of Autism and ASperger syndrome is one of them,it is less severe and usually occurs in females..Autism is becoming more frequent yet doctors and scientists truly dont know what the cause is but they do believe it may be genetic,and since it usually isnt diagnosed until the ages between 2 and 4,it would be highly unlikely to detect beforehand if you and your husbands child will develop it..still yet,you and your husband should see a genetic counselor and have tests run before getting pregnant to rule out any other possible genetic abnormalities…the good news though,is that even with Autism reaching its all time high,the treatments are getting better and with more success…hope this helped! Good luck…

For more info visit
http://health.yahoo.com/nervous-overview/autism-topic-overview/healthwise–hw152186.html

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Question?: What Is Autism Yahoo

Sandra asks…

Are there any cases of a child developing Autism, who has not taken vaccines?

I am doing some research on potential links of Autism, and I can’t find any information about Autism cases in children who have not received vaccines in their lifetime.
You did not answer my question. Are there any reported cases of children who have not received vaccinations developing Autism? I don’t need to be lectured.

admin answers:

There are parents who said their children were not vaccinated who got autism, but most then realized their children did get vaccines without them knowing about it. For example, the first day of birth, children are given the Hep B vaccine. The consent for this is signed with the intake paperwork, and with all that paperwork, most of it doesn’t get read, so this is how they consented without realizing it. There was a study done in California that stated that those who got vaccines were about 4 times more likely to get autism then those who didn’t. I didn’t look at the study to see if I felt the kids truly were not vaccinated. But, two birthing clinics have come forward and stated that in their thousands of births, no child has developed autism. I imagine you can easily Google to find it, “birthing clinic thousands autism” ought to bring it up. I think one’s in Illinois. What makes the birthing clinics different from hospital-born children? Pitocin to induce labor which is known to effect the immune system, and those with autism have a faulty immune system; then there are the eye drops put into all newborns, and also a Vit. K shot, and then the epidural. Not sure what else is different, but something is very amiss. Children recovered from autism are doing so by receiving treatments for pathogens and toxins due to a faulty immune system. There are so many things effecting their immune systems, that is really is difficult to blame one thing. If you go to the autism forums, most will say that their vaccinated children are more ill than their non-vaccinated, but some say the opposite. So, it’s not an easy answer. Most of the highly successful doctors who are recovering children from autism say that vaccines are a big part, but more so because the children were already subjected to immune stressors, and the vaccines were the tipping point. I think what is best is to go to the governmental websites, like the CDC and learn all about the vaccine ingredients, risk of getting the disease, possible fatalities from each disease, etc. Also look into homeopathy to raise the same antibodies as the vaccines are suppose to. Many get blood tests after homeopathy to show they have antibodies to vaccinated illnesses so they can show their children don’t need them. This would be the best route, for many who get vaccinated either don’t get enough antibodies to ward off the illness or get too high of antibodies. This is what I have learned by researching daily for 4 years. My children are recovered from autism, but it’s much better to prevent it because my kids are still dependent upon diet and treatments to keep symptoms away. You can go to Yahoo Groups on autism recovery and ask the parents there as well. They can also tell you where to find research on it. There are websites that have collections of this research readily available. You can Google “autism monkey primates vaccines” for a couple of new studies done on monkeys given vaccines. They are pretty shocking. Because I am over 40, I have seen children years ago and can compare them to today. The difference is very unbelievable. I am glad I am old enough to have seen kids before all this autism, ADHD, OCD, anxiety, etc. Came along. When you see it in real time, then you really know.

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Question?: Autism Signs In Children

Ruth asks…

How do you tell someone to get their child evaluted?

This family has one 5 year old with PDD a 18 month old who can’t sit up and rocks back and forth while on the floor, Dad wants him evaluated, but also has a 3 year old who has deffinate signs of autism too. Dad thinks he’s a genious bacause he is so drilled. How can we get Dad to see the light?

admin answers:

Try putting it to him like this since , since the other two do and seem to have autism It is a precautionary thing to have the middle child evaluated too. Explain that there are various degrees of autism and that some people w/ as are brilliant. Advise him that it is more likely for his middle child to have autism because his siblings do than some one who’s siblings don’t. As a parent of autistic children he should understand how important early intervention is. If all else fails ask him this. If there were even the slightest chance that his child had a life threatening disease like cancer he would have the child tested wouldn’t he ? The eval is just a test If the child doesn’t have autism what will it hurt?

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