Tag Archives: Autism And Asperger Syndrome

Question?: Treatment For Autism Children

Thomas asks…

What are the chances of us having an autistic child?

My husband’s niece has Asperger Syndrome. Are the chances higher than average for us to have a baby with AS or autism?

admin answers:

There are a few different spectrums of Autism and ASperger syndrome is one of them,it is less severe and usually occurs in females..Autism is becoming more frequent yet doctors and scientists truly dont know what the cause is but they do believe it may be genetic,and since it usually isnt diagnosed until the ages between 2 and 4,it would be highly unlikely to detect beforehand if you and your husbands child will develop it..still yet,you and your husband should see a genetic counselor and have tests run before getting pregnant to rule out any other possible genetic abnormalities…the good news though,is that even with Autism reaching its all time high,the treatments are getting better and with more success…hope this helped! Good luck…

For more info visit
http://health.yahoo.com/nervous-overview/autism-topic-overview/healthwise–hw152186.html

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Question?: What Is Autism

George asks…

What is the best current explanation for autism?

I asked my psychology professor about what causes autism from a neurological perspective, and he said that if he could answer that question, he’d get a Nobel Prize. However, there must be many hypotheses regarding this question, so which one is the most plausible?

admin answers:

It’s principally genetic, (but not one single “gene for autism!) though there seems to be some variation which requires the influence of environmental factors.
The two most considered at present are variations in womb temperature, and in foetal steroid and non-steroid hormones,
(not toxins or infections, diseases etc.)
Neither of these strands have progressed beyond hypothesis, unless my reading is out-of-date.

I’m working from information in Simon-Baron Cohen’s Autism and Asperger Syndrome (2009)
He cites six strands of evidence pointing to genetics as the major and critical component.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Causes

Robert asks…

How many know about Aspergers Syndrome?

I am wondering how many people out her know about aspergers syndrome. If you do then please elaborate on how you came to know and if you don’t then please explain why it has never come up. Thankyou for your time.

admin answers:

I had a friend who’s son has aspergers syndrome and as i always do, (i’m very inquisitive) i looked it up on the web.
READ:
Asperger’s Disorder is a milder variant of Autistic Disorder. Both Asperger’s Disorder and Autistic Disorder are in fact subgroups of a larger diagnostic category. This larger category is called either Autistic Spectrum Disorders, mostly in European countries, or Pervasive Developmental Disorders (“PDD”), in the United States. In Asperger’s Disorder, affected individuals are characterized by social isolation and eccentric behavior in childhood. There are impairments in two-sided social interaction and non-verbal communication. Though grammatical, their speech is peculiar due to abnormalities of inflection and a repetitive pattern. Clumsiness is prominent both in their articulation and gross motor behavior. They usually have a circumscribed area of interest which usually leaves no space for more age appropriate, common interests. Some examples are cars, trains, French Literature, door knobs, hinges, cappucino, meteorology, astronomy or history. The name “Asperger” comes from Hans Asperger, an Austrian physician who first described the syndrome in 1944. An excellent translation of Dr. Asperger’s original paper is provided by Dr. Uta Frith in her Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

DSM-IV DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR ASPERGER’S DISORDER

A.Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

(1) marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction
(2) failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
(3) a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
(4) lack of social or emotional reciprocity

B.Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:

(1) encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
(2) apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
(3) stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
(4) persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

C.The disturbance causes clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

D.There is no clinically significant general delay in language (e.g., single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years).

E.There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development or in the development of age-appropriate self-help skills, adaptive behavior (other than in social interaction), and curiosity about the environment in childhood.

F.Criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or Schizophrenia.

At least two of the following)
(a) inability to interact with peers
(b) lack of desire to interact with peers
(c) lack of appreciation of social cues
(d) socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior

2.All-absorbing narrow interest
(at least one of the following)
(a) exclusion of other activities
(b) repetitive adherence
(c) more rote than meaning

3.Imposition of routines and interests
(at least one of the following)
(a) on self, in aspects of life
(b) on others

4.Speech and language problems
(at least three of the following)
(a) delayed development
(b) superficially perfect expressive language
(c) formal, pedantic language
(d) odd prosody, peculiar voice characteristics
(e) impairment of comprehension including misinterpretations of literal/implied meanings

5.Non-verbal communication problems
(at least one of the following)
(a) limited use of gestures
(b) clumsy/gauche body language
(c) limited facial expression
(d) inappropriate expression
(e) peculiar, stiff gaze

6.Motor clumsiness: poor performance on neurodevelopmental examination

(All six criteria must be met for confirmation of diagnosis.)

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Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Fiction

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

The depiction of fictional characters with Autism or Asperger Syndrome in modern literature typically, either purposefully or not, exposes the challenges these characters face and how they overcome them as well as influencing how other people perceive those with the disability.  It is important to remember however that these are works of fiction; the authors are creative writers striving to entertain.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time 

Although publicly disclaimed by author Mark Haddon as not being about a character with Asperger Syndrome, many people are of the opinion that, in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, the behavioral problem the main character exhibits is a portrayal of Asperger.

Christopher, the main character, is gifted in the ability to solve math problems, but he has difficulty relating to other people.  The story follows his experiences as he solves the mystery of a murdered dog.  Many have argued that Christopher’s mannerisms and actions throughout the book, as well as his reactions to things around him are a vivid depiction of Asperger.

A Wizard Alone

A Wizard Alone by Diane Duane is the sixth in a series entitled Young Wizards.  The theme of the Young Wizards series can be described as a combination of religion and fantasy.  The source of conflict and plot reads like a 21st century biblical tale with a supreme being and their servant spiritual beings in a strategic battle with spiritual forces attempting to subvert existence.

Darryl McAllister is a young wizard, a mortal group of beings tasked with fighting the spiritual evil.  Darryl is autistic and currently undertaking his wizardry rite of passage.  With the help of two other wizards Darryl fights and subdues the supreme spiritual evil.  Throughout this book, a lot of the mannerisms and reactions to situations are regarded as accurate representations of autism.

Al Capone Does My Shirts

Author Gennifer Choldenko’s Al Capone Does My Shirts is a young adult novel that intertwines the experience of caring for an autistic family member with the story of a child’s mischief and creativity.

The character of Moose Flanagan has a sister named Natalie who is autistic.  The family has just moved to Alcatraz Island because the father got a job as a prison guard.  Moose takes care of Natalie and is a friend with the prison warden’s daughter Piper who talks Moose into a scheme to make money off of their friends by falsely offering to have Al Capone wash their laundry.  This book is generally considered to be an accurate portrayal of the challenges of caring for a family member with autism.

These are just a few of the many examples of available fiction books portraying characters with Autism or Asperger Syndrome, and the different perspectives that can be presented.  Many more can be located through search engines, book reviews, and retailers.

By Brock M. Hunter

Enhanced by ZemantaTagged as: Asperger syndrome, Autism spectrum, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Mark Haddon

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Children With Autism Suffer More Severe Symptoms When Born Either Preterm Or Post-term

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pregnancy / Obstetrics
Article Date: 05 Apr 2012 – 1:00 PDT

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For children with autism, being born several weeks early or several weeks late tends to increase the severity of their symptoms, according to new research out of Michigan State University.

Additionally, autistic children who were born either preterm or post-term are more likely to self-injure themselves compared with autistic children born on time, revealed the study by Tammy Movsas of MSU’s Department of Epidemiology.

Though the study did not uncover why there is an increase in autistic symptoms, the reasons may be tied to some of the underlying causes of why a child is born preterm (prior to 37 weeks) or post-term (after 42 weeks) in the first place.

The research appears online in the Journal of Autism and Development Disorders.

Movsas, a postdoctoral epidemiology fellow in MSU’s College of Human Medicine, said the study reveals there are many different manifestations of autism spectrum disorder, a collection of developmental disorders including both autism and Asperger syndrome. It also shows the length of the mother’s pregnancy is one factor affecting the severity of the disorder.

While previous research has linked premature birth to higher rates of autism, this is one of the first studies to look at the severity of the disease among autistic children who had been born early, on time and late.

“We think about autism being caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors,” she said. “With preterm and post-term babies, there is something underlying that is altering the genetic expression of autism.

“The outside environment in which a preterm baby continues to mature is very different than the environment that the baby would have experienced in utero. This change in environment may be part of the reason why there is a difference in autistic severity in this set of infants.”

Movsas added that for post-term babies, the longer exposure to hormones while a baby is in utero, the higher chance of placental malfunction and the increased rate of C-section and instrument-assisted births may play a role.

The study also found that babies born outside of normal gestational age (40 weeks) – specifically very preterm babies – showed an increase in stereotypical autistic mannerisms.

“Normal gestation age of birth seems to mitigate the severity of autism spectrum disorder symptoms, and the types of autistic traits tend to be different depending on age at birth,” she said.

The study analyzed an online database compiled by Kennedy Krieger Institute at Johns Hopkins University of nearly 4,200 mothers – with autistic children ages 4-21 – between 2006 and 2010. It divided the data on births into four categories: very preterm (born prior to 34 weeks); preterm (34 to 37 weeks); standard (37 to 42 weeks); and post-term (born after 42 weeks)

The mothers filled out a pair of questionnaires regarding the symptoms of their autistic children, and the results revealed very preterm, preterm and post-term autistic children had significantly higher screening scores for autism spectrum disorder than autistic children born full term.

“The findings point to the fact that although autism has a strong genetic component, something about pregnancy or the perinatal period may affect how autism manifests,” said Nigel Paneth, an MSU epidemiologist who worked with Movsas on the paper. “This adds to our earlier finding that prematurity is a major risk factor for autism spectrum disorder and may help us understand if anything can be done during early life to prevent or alleviate autism spectrum disorder.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
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Presentation of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome: A review

Presentation of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools. sign in icon Sign In | My Tools | Contact Us | HELP SJO banner Search all journals Advanced Search Go Search History Go Browse Journals Go Skip to main page content

Home OnlineFirst All Issues Subscribe RSS rss Email Alerts Search this journal Advanced Journal Search » Presentation of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome A review Mary E. Stewart

Heriot-Watt University, UK, m.e.stewart{at}hw.ac.uk Louise Barnard
University of Newcastle, UK Joanne Pearson
University of Northumbria, UK Reem Hasan
University of Newcastle, UK Gregory O’Brien
University of Northumbria, UK Abstract Depression is common in autism and Asperger syndrome, but despite this, there has been little research into this issue. This review considers the current literature on the prevalence, presentation, treatment and assessment of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome. There are diagnostic difficulties when considering depression in autism and Asperger syndrome, as the characteristics of these disorders, such as social withdrawal and appetite and sleep disturbance, are also core symptoms of depression. Impaired verbal and non-verbal communication can mask the symptoms of depression. Symptoms associated with autism and Asperger syndrome such as obsessionality and self-injury may be increased during an episode of depression. There is a clear need to develop specific tools both for diagnostic purposes and for measurement of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome in order to help alleviate the distress caused by this treatable illness.

Asperger syndrome autism depression review Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

« Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.1177/1362361306062013 Autism January 2006 vol. 10 no. 1 103-116 » Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Request Permissions Request Reprints Load patientINFORMation Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Stewart, M. E. Articles by O’Brien, G. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Stewart, M. E. Articles by O’Brien, G. Related Content Load related web page information Share Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

Current Issue January 2012, 16 (1) Current Issue Alert me to new issues of Autism Submit a ManuscriptSubmit a Manuscript Free Sample CopyFree Sample Copy Email AlertsEmail Alerts Rss FeedsRSS feed More about this journal About the Journal Editorial Board Manuscript Submission Abstracting/Indexing Subscribe Account Manager Recommend to Library Advertising Reprints Permissions society image The National Autistic Society Most Most Read Social StoriesTM to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Evidence-Based Practices and Autism Inclusion for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: The first ten years of a community program » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Diagnosis in Autism: A Survey of Over 1200 Patients in the UK The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Anxiety in High-Functioning Children with Autism The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test): Preliminary Development of a UK Screen for Mainstream Primary-School-Age Children Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome » View all Most Cited articles HOME ALL ISSUES FEEDBACK SUBSCRIBE RSS rss EMAIL ALERTS HELP Copyright © 2012 by The National Autistic Society, SAGE Publications Print ISSN: 1362-3613 Online ISSN: 1461-7005

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Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome

Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools. sign in icon Sign In | My Tools | Contact Us | HELP SJO banner Search all journals Advanced Search Go Search History Go Browse Journals Go Skip to main page content

Home OnlineFirst All Issues Subscribe RSS rss Email Alerts Search this journal Advanced Journal Search » Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome Patricia Howlin

St George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK Abstract The paper reviews what is known about outcome in adult life for more able individuals within the autistic spectrum. Because of the problems associated with differential diagnosis, the results of studies involving high-functioning people with autism and Asperger syndrome are combined. The review focuses predominantly on long-term follow-up research and covers outcome in terms of cognitive, linguistic, academic and adaptive functioning; educational and employment history; independence and social relationships; and behavioural and psychiatric problems. The stability of IQ and other measures over time, and variables related to outcome, are also investigated.

Asperger syndrome autism follow-up studies outcomes Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

« Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.1177/1362361300004001005 Autism March 2000 vol. 4 no. 1 63-83 » Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Download to citation manager Request Permissions Request Reprints Load patientINFORMation Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Howlin, P. Search for related content PubMed Articles by Howlin, P. Related Content Load related web page information Share Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

Current Issue January 2012, 16 (1) Current Issue Alert me to new issues of Autism Submit a ManuscriptSubmit a Manuscript Free Sample CopyFree Sample Copy Email AlertsEmail Alerts Rss FeedsRSS feed More about this journal About the Journal Editorial Board Manuscript Submission Abstracting/Indexing Subscribe Account Manager Recommend to Library Advertising Reprints Permissions society image The National Autistic Society Most Most Read Social StoriesTM to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Evidence-Based Practices and Autism Inclusion for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: The first ten years of a community program » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Diagnosis in Autism: A Survey of Over 1200 Patients in the UK The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Anxiety in High-Functioning Children with Autism The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test): Preliminary Development of a UK Screen for Mainstream Primary-School-Age Children Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome » View all Most Cited articles HOME ALL ISSUES FEEDBACK SUBSCRIBE RSS rss EMAIL ALERTS HELP Copyright © 2012 by The National Autistic Society, SAGE Publications Print ISSN: 1362-3613 Online ISSN: 1461-7005

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The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools. sign in icon Sign In | My Tools | Contact Us | HELP SJO banner Search all journals Advanced Search Go Search History Go Browse Journals Go Skip to main page content

Home OnlineFirst All Issues Subscribe RSS rss Email Alerts Search this journal Advanced Journal Search » The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Joseph A. Kim

McMaster University, Canada Peter Szatmari
McMaster University, Canada Susan E. Bryson
York University, Canada David L. Streiner
University of Toronto, Canada Freda J. Wilson
McMaster University, Canada Abstract The objective of this study was to report on the prevalence and correlates of anxiety and mood problems among 9- to 14- year-old children with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism. Children who received a diagnosis of autism (n 40) or AS (n 19) on a diagnostic interview when they were 4 to 6 years of age were administered a battery of cognitive and behavioural measures. Families were contacted roughly 6 years later (at mean age of 12 years) and assessed for evidence of psychiatric problems including mood and anxiety disorders. Compared with a sample of 1751 community children, AS and autistic children demonstrated a greater rate of anxiety and depression problems. These problems had a significant impact on their overall adaptation. There were, however, no differences in the number of anxiety and mood problems between the AS and autistic children within this high-functioning cohort. The number of psychiatric problems was not correlated with early autistic symptoms but was predicted to a small extent by early verbal/non-verbal IQ discrepancy scores. These data indicate that high-functioning PDD children are at greater risk for mood and anxiety problems than the general population but the correlates and risk factors for these comorbid problems remain unclear.

adaptation anxiety Asperger syndrome autism mood Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

« Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.1177/1362361300004002002 Autism June 2000 vol. 4 no. 2 117-132 » Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Download to citation manager Request Permissions Request Reprints Load patientINFORMation Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Kim, J. A. Articles by Wilson, F. J. Search for related content PubMed Articles by Kim, J. A. Articles by Wilson, F. J. Related Content Load related web page information Share Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

Current Issue January 2012, 16 (1) Current Issue Alert me to new issues of Autism Submit a ManuscriptSubmit a Manuscript Free Sample CopyFree Sample Copy Email AlertsEmail Alerts Rss FeedsRSS feed More about this journal About the Journal Editorial Board Manuscript Submission Abstracting/Indexing Subscribe Account Manager Recommend to Library Advertising Reprints Permissions society image The National Autistic Society Most Most Read Social StoriesTM to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Evidence-Based Practices and Autism Inclusion for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: The first ten years of a community program » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Diagnosis in Autism: A Survey of Over 1200 Patients in the UK The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Anxiety in High-Functioning Children with Autism The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test): Preliminary Development of a UK Screen for Mainstream Primary-School-Age Children Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome » View all Most Cited articles HOME ALL ISSUES FEEDBACK SUBSCRIBE RSS rss EMAIL ALERTS HELP Copyright © 2012 by The National Autistic Society, SAGE Publications Print ISSN: 1362-3613 Online ISSN: 1461-7005

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Autism Ribbons Increases Awareness

We are living in societies, where we need to interact and communicate with people. We have certain responsibilities towards our society. You will see that there are many people, who are suffering from different kinds of diseases and are living extremely painful lives. You will see that diseases like cancer, HIV Aids and a number of such horrifying diseases have brought in darkness, in the lives of people. Similarly, the misery through which autism patients are going through has really brought people in the gloomy state of their lives. Autism is one of those diseases, through which children are suffering since many years. The symptoms of this disease start to become visible, when the child reaches at the age of 2 to 3 years old. Doctors have not been able to know any kind of permanent treatment for this disease, but they have been giving certain kind of therapies and medications, which helps in keeping this disease under control.

The treatment for autism is very expensive. Autism patients, who belong from well-off families, can afford to undergo from autism treatments, but poor patients cannot afford to bear such expenses. For all such patients, many charitable organizations are contributing their generous efforts. These organizations are using different ways of collecting and generating funds. Selling of fundraising merchandises is one of the most successful ways of collecting donations and funds from a larger segment of the society. Ribbons of different colors are being attached to different kinds of accessories and garments, which highlight the fundraising for specific causes. Autism ribbons are used to highlight the cause of raising funds for autism and for the patients of asperger syndrome.

All those people, who want to donate money, in order to help the patients of autism and asperger syndrome, they can purchase different things like bracelets and bangles, which have autism ribbon attached to them or engraved or can also purchase autism magnets, which they can use on their refrigerators or in cars, which will help in spreading awareness regarding to autism ribbons.

Autism awareness ribbon has acted perfectly in making people aware of their responsibilities towards their societies. Now more and more people are pushing those things, which come with autism ribbons attached to them. The aim of selling fundraising merchandises is to say thanks to those people, who donate money to charities, which is utilized in the treatment of patients, suffering from different diseases. There are thought provoking words printed on beautiful bracelets and bangles, which say thanks, help, love and care. These words leave an unmemorable impression on the hearts of the people, who donate money and in this way they keep themselves attached with such noble causes and activities. If you also want to show humane and generous behavior, towards autism and asperger syndrome patients, then you must purchase those items, which have autism ribbons imprinted or attached with them. In this way you will get to live with a feeling of satisfaction and contentment, for you have also helped the needy segment of the society.

http://www.fundraisingforacause.com is a fundraising organization for different causes, help us to spread awareness in the world with autism ribbons and autism awareness ribbon. We hope you have enjoyed this article.

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Some Important Facts Of Autism

The interaction and community skills of the person is affected life long by this disease. Comparing with other children the children with autism behave differently. Mostly the children have problem in speaking, as a result the child is not able to express his feelings in proper words.

The parent of an autistic child could understand this easily, rather than the people to know the real fact. Reality is unknown for them. So some important things that will give them a clear understanding is given here.

There are many theories which gives the possible cause of autism. Some think this is caused by the mercury which are in the vaccines given to infants. Whilst few states that it is due to parent’s age. But the more appropriate theory is that autism is because of genetic and environmental factors.

Autism is also called as Autism Spectrum Disorder. Because few are non-verbal and mentally retarded whilst few are verbal and bright. There are varied range of symptoms in different children with autism. Social communication is the main symptom seen in most of the patients. They fail to maintain good eye contact, converse properly with others, or have one’s perspective etc.

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Autism and Asperger Syndrome have some similarities. Both cases have problems which are mostly common. In Autism, child’s speech is delayed while in Asperger Syndrome the speech develops at appropriate age and time. In other words, the child with Asperger Syndrome is verbal and bright.

It is a common fact that every individual is different from another. Similarly, each autism child differs from other. Some may speak well while other may be silent. Some may be affected physically with GIT problems, sensory problems, difficulty in sleep, etc, whereas some have problem in social communication. Even if the disease is the same, the symptoms they have varies in each individual.

Yet autism remains without proper cure though the medical field has great advancement. Though there a different ways by which their skills can be improved they still cannot remain as normal children. Some treatments for autism are behavioral, biomedical, sensory, developmental or even arts-based. Depending upon the child, certain treatments will be more successful than others.

It is a common fact that autism is a life long disease. The symptoms may become mild with proper timely interventions. Without depending others, they can try to do their activities of daily living. The communication skill can also be increased.

If one gets autism, the whole family seems to be in a stressed situation. They have to withstand many adverse conditions. So at this time, the support of relatives and friends is important. By this way they can overcome this situation. By this they can be motivated to overcome this disease.
Also gather more details on autism symptoms and causes of autism.
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