Tag Archives: Aspergers

Question?: Autistic Artist

Steven asks…

How common is it for people with Aspergers not to have a special interest?

I don’t have a special interest. There are just things that I am passionate about the same as other people so I am curious about how common it is.

admin answers:

Just as common as in the general population. There’s this stereotype purveyed by the popular media that all people with aspergers or more sever autistic spectrum disorders are savants or really dedicated to one particular subject.

What you see on TV are only the people who they deem interesting enough to show you. Who’s more interesting? An autistic artist or a “normal” autistic person who doesn’t really specialize in one thing? Most people with a disorder such as aspergers or autism do not have one special interest.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Sharon asks…

A question about genetics. I have a child with ?

PDD-NOS, which is an autism spectrum disorder. I’ve read that normally people have a 1 in 150 chance of having a child with autism, but it jumps up to 1 in 20 for people who already have an autistic child.

My question is, does anyone know what my chances would be of having a child with classic autism or Rett‘s syndrome? I’m not worried about having a child with PDD-NOS or Aspergers, but I do have concerns about having a child with classic autism.
Hi Sally! Last July my son had been checked for Fragile X since he not only has PDD, but also scored low on a few I.Q. tests and has hyper-flexibility in his joints. However, he was not found to have this condition. I thank God, because I was terrified.

He’s seeing the genetics counselor again next Monday (for what, I do not know) but when I had asked the doctor the question, I didn’t receive much more than an answer that I have around a 1 in 20 chance of having another child with an ASD, but wasn’t informed on the risk for having one with classic autism. I was just hoping that possibly someone here knew the risk.

admin answers:

Hi …I am not sure but i was told i ‘might’ have another child with autism if i were to have another baby, i know a lady who has three children two girls and a boy the two older girls both have autism one more severe than the other the boy doesn’t have problems, so i would say yes there is always a chance

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Susan asks…

How to cope with my daughter with asperger’s being depressed?

My daughter, Elizabeth, was diagnosed with Asperger‘s Syndrome at age 6. She is now 16 years old. She’s been depressed because all these years, she’s never actually had a social relationship with others. She really wants friends. But, I don’t know were she can develop peer interaction with others now that school is out. Any tips on her coping with depression?

admin answers:

Look to the autism support network,there are kids with aspergers there and can help support each other.Can also get advice from adults with it.Look at the books Gut and psychology Syndrome and Balance Your brain balance Your Life,and look at reviews at Amazon.

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Question?: Pdd-nos

Sandy asks…

Should my oldest child with Aspergers or baby have their own room?

My seven year old son has Aspergers and my five year old son has PDD-NOS. They have been sharing a room for the past few years but my oldest has started to ask for his own room. The problem is, I have a one year old daughter and we live in a three bedroom house. I don’t know if I should give the boys their own room and put her in our bedroom. If anyone has any insight or suggestions I would really appreciate it!

admin answers:

Nobody knows your kids like you. Nobody knows the specific issues your Aspergers and PDD-NOS kids have like you do. Nobody knows how often your 1 yr old climbs in with you anyway or how well she does in your room. So nobody here can come close to saying what *you* should do.

That said… We have a *tiny* three bedroom house with four kids (13, 6, 4.5, and 3yrs) and are expecting our fifth. My oldest has Aspergers and we suspect the 3 yr old may as well. So far the 6 yr old is the only girl.

One bedroom is so small we just used it as a ‘computer room’ for years and put all the kids in the biggest bedroom… But the youngest actually slept with us. But with the oldest being so much older we finally moved him into that room alone last year. Now the others still have the big room and the new baby will be sharing with us.

With your boys being so close in age… I personally like the idea of giving them the big room and ‘splitting’ it for them. However… I don’t have a clue what sort of Aspie issues you are having between the two of them. That would be the deciding factor to me. If they really *need* their space and the little girl likes sharing your room… That would simply make more sense for you. But if they are only asking for their own room and not really showing signs of *needing* it… I think I’d leave them.

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Question?: Pdd

Jenny asks…

Does PDD-NOS gradually disappear as they get older?

I’ve heard from several sources that unlike other branches of autism like Aspergers, PDD-NOS can be outgrown or disappears in adult life. Can I get some input from some mental health professionals with experience with people with it? My 4 year old daughter was just diagnosed with it and she loves trains and spends most if not all of her alone time jumping and flapping her arms in a corner and talking to herself under her breath. I love her to bits. I’m just wondering if it will stay with her as she grows up. Any help will be strongly appreciated.

admin answers:

My 2.5 year old also has PDD-NOS and I was told the same thing by a pediatrician. I honestly don’t think they totally outgrow it but that because it is less severe than classic autism its possible for them to overcome a lot of the symptoms which would cause them to loose the PDD-NOS label. I do think that some things will still stay with them when they grow up but it will likely be so mild that it will be unnoticeable by anyone who doesn’t know she had been diagnosed as PDD-NOS.
Many parents are recovering their children by reversing the symptoms of autism so I do think that it could be possible to completely overcome PDD-NOS using biomedical treatment. If you want some more info on it here are some good websites
http://www.autism.com/index.asp
http://www.generationrescue.org/
http://danasview.net/
and here are some good groups where you can talk to other parents who are recovering their children
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/abmd/?yguid=243434626
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/GFCFKids/?yguid=243434626

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Question?: Pdd Symptoms

Linda asks…

Is it possible to have severe aspergers?

Autism has a scale and aspergers is on the high end. So I know it doesn’t make sense to say severe aspergers b/c that would be equivalent to pdd or classic autism. But I have extreme difficulties in social interaction, worse than most people with aspergers…yet in all other areas i’m high functioning.

admin answers:

You’re right, asperger’s syndrome is on the high-functioning end of the autism spectrum but to say that someone has severe asperger’s doesn’t mean they are the same as other autism spectrum sufferers.

Asperger’s is different in that the level of linguistic and cognitive development is close to normal. This means that while a person with asperger’s will struggle with social interactions and display repetitive behaviour they do not suffer from the low functioning language or cognitive skills of other diagnoses.

Severe asperger’s means simply that the symptoms displayed (difficulty with social interactions etc.) will be more pronounced.

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Question?: Pdd Autism

Mary asks…

Can you tell me about the medical condition Autism?

why do mostly boys get autism? can it become better as the child grows? can people with autism live normal lives when they grow up?

admin answers:

Hi there!

Autism is a spectrum, meaning that there are many “types” of autism, and the “severity” of the autistic traits can vary, from one individual to another. It’s considered a “disability” by the ADA, however, many people who have higher-functioning forms of autism feel that they do not have a disability, but are actually what’s called neurologically diverse. Aspergers is one form of autism which is actually a lot more common than one would think! Autism is not something which “goes away”, although certain characteristics can be managed more effectively with time. When a person “finds a way” to adapt to a shortcoming, the new way of dealing with that is called an “adaptive behavior.” There are also maladaptive behaviors. This is when a person comes up with a not-so-great way to adapt. Ii guess you could say it’s like a “defense mechanism” in some ways.

Boys have been diagnosed more frequently with autism in the past, although it has been found that girls “really can have autism”! For instance, I have Aspergers, which is on the spectrum, but most people who meet me have no idea. Boys have more “classic” behaviors than girls do, although in my opinion, this is because of many gender differences. You may have noticed that some more “assertive” women in the public eye are suspected (or do have) Aspergers. I think this is because their personality enables the manifestation of more “typical” behaviors. (Think: Madonna and Sharon Stone. Strong women.)

People with autism (especially the higher-functioning forms, such as HFA, PDD, and Aspergers) CAN have normal lives. Of course, if they have the opportunity for guidance when they are younger, they develop more adaptive (and fewer maladaptive) behaviors, so they fit into society generally well. Many people with AU (that’s the abbreviation for autism) follow their interests vocationally, and can be very successful in those things which they find interesting. When people with AU are creative, for instance, being in a creative field is ideal, because many creative people are individualistic.

A note about the higher end of the spectrum… A diagnostic criteria for Aspergers (for instance) is that that cognitive ability must not be dimished. (This is one reason why they give IQ tests when diagnosing.) So if you look at a group of people with Aspergers, you are 100% certain that they are all at least of average cognitive ability. You can’t say the same for the rest of the population. By definition, average intelligence is average because half is above, and half is below.) The point I’m making is that if you know someone with Aspergers, (a child, familiy member, someone at work) you can be sure that they are intelligent. This helps people who don’t have AU to give some additional credibility to ideas or suggestions. (People who don’t have AU are sometimes called “neurotypical”, or NT, when we talk about people with and without autism.)

People with autism and Aspergers are actually a wonderful societal resource. There can at times be stigma around those with Aspergers, when people don’t understand the little things that they do.

An example: Most people with Aspergers (AS) have some sort of uber-developed sense. For instance, hearing. (My Aspie son has said, “Mom, I can hear things very distinctly!”) For a person with AU who needs to concentrate, something like cubes being built in the same room, or a woodpecker outside the window can be a little distracting. A person with AS may request that they complete their task in a better setting until the cubes are built. In an office where they are not as accepting of neurological diversity, this could be falsely seen as “elitist” or something similar. It’s not, of course, it’s what that person temporarily needs in order to do the best work on the expected task. There are laws in place to prevent discrimination, although Aspergers in the workplace is one area that is a little behind-the-times with regard to diversity training…! These days, companies which have a high probability for Aspergers employees (like computer companies, engineering firms, architects, accounting, etc…) are seeking diversity training so that the company can benefit from a productively symbiotic relationship between Aspies and NTs.

Anyway, This might be a little more info than you were looking for, but I hope it’s helpful. (Explaining how to “build a watch” is a typical AS trait, and one I am actively striving to improve! 🙂

Feel free to ask more questions if you are interested. I have some of my sites listed if you would like to learn more.

Lorin Neikirk

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Betty asks…

Can adults be diagnosed with Aspergers for the first time?

And, if so, are there treatments effective for adults who have never been diagnosed before?

admin answers:

Yes, adults can be diagnosed with Asperger’s, even if they have never had an autism spectrum disorder or any other diagnosis previously. And yes, there are treatments that are effective, however many adults being diagnosed for the first time have “self-selected” certain aspects of their lives in order to deal with their disability. For example, often adults with Asperger’s choose jobs where there is not a lot of social interaction required. Here’s a good website that has information about Asperger’s in adults:

http://www.aspennj.org/

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Question?: Treatment For Autism

Ruth asks…

How to find a local doctor who specializes in autism/aspergers treatment with vitamins and minerals?

I want to try B12 shots but I’m afraid to go to a regular psychiatrist office because they might not know anything about autism/aspergers and they typically only know how to write prescriptions for xanax and antidepressants.
Yes they can help dummy.

admin answers:

Vitamins and minerals will not help autism. See your physician and ask them to refer you to an autism specialist MD to help you.

I’M a dummy? Really, see a doctor instead of whatever herbal natural “medicine” quack you’ve been seeing. Get your facts straight.

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