Tag Archives: Asperger

Question?: Autistic Disorder

John asks…

Autism reported to get worse with a patient?

I have been talking to care staff that work with an autistic man, who is siad to be getting worse autistically.

The mans mother claims that in the past, he was able to ride a bike, go out for walks, run, play and so on when he was a child.

However, his mother claims that it is because he is on medication today and that this is why his behaviour has got worse with time.
She would like him to come off medication.

His dose of medication has been reduced, but not much of a behaviour difference has been observed by the staff.

As I understand it, AS and Autistic disorder remains unchanged in its magniture through out life. But there are variables that can make its effects more or less noticable, such as adolescence and becoming an adult.

In many cases, as such people grow to become adults, I hear reports of a decline in such behaviour.

Can this condition become more or less severe in terms of brain structural damage?
If so, why?

admin answers:

Cosmic… The question wasn’t regarding a child, but an autistic MAN who, I’m assuming, is in a group home.

You didn’t state if this is a new medication or he’s been on it awhile. If it’s a fairly new med, first of all why is he on it? Second, maybe it needs to be lowered more? Or, a different one tried. All of these can affect change in any individual,so they really need to be thought about for the individual, not just as the group as a whole. Asperger’s and autism CAN and often do change throughout the person’s life, depending on what is being done with that person. As they mature, they can learn to live with it better, some even covering it up better. But because it affects them socially and emotionally, the way it affects them can change depending on their situations. For my son, I notice changes in him if he’s sick or getting sick, too tired, hasn’t been stimulated enough sensorily, or he’s been over-stimulated. Those are just a few of the things that bring about temporary change. Long-term changes can be (in terms of improving) brought about through working with the individual, helping them learn self-control, etc. Problem is, as an adult, they’re usually not as open to change and won’t cooperate with it, so typically there is ‘less’ change when they hit adulthood. Now, in terms of regression, what is his day like? Is anyone trying to stimulate him, or engage him in his world, or are they just leaving it up to him? He might be going through a rough spot like we all do, not feeling motivated enough to do the things he was doing. If that came about after starting the meds, I would say his mom is right. So, really you have to look at the things leading up to his regression, what is being done to try to help him out of it, and how responsive he is. Maybe his mom could try getting him to do these things. Really, even though he’s autistic you’re still dealing with an individual personality who is going to have ups and downs. It’s just that with autism, they’re usually much more pronounced, more severe. In terms of brain structural damage, what has he been exposed to? I’ve seen with my son that changes in diets, changes in chemicals that he’s exposed to, will drastically affect him. Check to see if the cleaners used to clean around the facility have been changed or increased in the amounts being used. Maybe a new employee is using too much of something, and that’s affecting his ability to function. I realize this isn’t actually structural damage, but these things drastically affect how they function, their ability to process.
Hopefully this gives you some different things to look at to find the culprit. I’m hoping this facility is respecting the mom’s wishes, though, if the only deciding factor ends up being the meds?

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

William asks…

wat are the symptons of asburghes?

what should i be looking for ????

admin answers:

The symptoms of Asperger’s can depends on the age the person. There can be variation by age group and gender — toddlers, kids, boys, girls, adults, women and men. Run a Google search for “symptoms of Asperger’s in _______”. You fill in the age group and gender. Or use the link below to get more general information by age.

Http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/tc/aspergers-syndrome-symptoms

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Question?: Pdd Symptoms

Helen asks…

Is It Possible to Both Have Aspergers and Borderline Autism?

I am wondering, because I seem to have symptoms of both.

admin answers:

Asperger’s is a form of autism (sometimes referred to as high functioning autism). Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is one of five disorders that falls under the umbrella of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD), a category of neurological disorders characterized by “severe and pervasive impairment in several areas of development.” The other 4 disorders are Asperger’s Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD), Rett’s Disorder, and PDD-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS – aka a-typical autism).

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Question?: Autistic Behavior

Mark asks…

How do I make my autistic son to understand that he cannot hit himself?

Whenever my son is punished for unacceptable behavior, he goes into his room and hits himself. His autism is very mild. He is high-functioning. His behavior is his biggest obstacle. He speaks very loudly. He talks back when he is told “no.” Is there anyone that is experiencing this? Does therapy help?

admin answers:

I know exactly what you are going through. I was exactly like that as a small child, and to some extent, I still am…lol
I’m high functioning autistic as well (Asperger’s Syndrome).
Maybe you could consult a child psychologist. I was diagnosed at age 13 (I’m 16 now) by a child psychologist, and have been seeing her regularly ever since. Autism is a social difference (I despise the use of the word ‘disorder’), so autistic kids don’t see social situations as most neurotipycals (‘normal’ people) do. My psychologist has worked through various social situations with me and is helping me understand how to fit in better with society. It can help later on in life if he starts learning about proper social behaviour at an early age.
Another good site to check out is http://www.aspiesforfreedom.com
It’s a forum for all people on the autism spectrum, and for parents of autistic kids. I’ve gained a tom of great advice from people there.
Hope that helped. =]

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Betty asks…

Can adults be diagnosed with Aspergers for the first time?

And, if so, are there treatments effective for adults who have never been diagnosed before?

admin answers:

Yes, adults can be diagnosed with Asperger’s, even if they have never had an autism spectrum disorder or any other diagnosis previously. And yes, there are treatments that are effective, however many adults being diagnosed for the first time have “self-selected” certain aspects of their lives in order to deal with their disability. For example, often adults with Asperger’s choose jobs where there is not a lot of social interaction required. Here’s a good website that has information about Asperger’s in adults:

http://www.aspennj.org/

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Question?: Autistic Adults

Helen asks…

What are typical characteristics of an adult with autism?

I know it’s a huge spectrum. But in general, what are typical characteristics of a high-functioning autistic adult? The more specifics, the better. Thanks!

admin answers:

It never ceases to amaze me how little Neurotypical people understand about us.
I am going to write you a very long response that hopefully will give you a different point of view. It may seem like a rant, which very well may be true. You asked for more specific though so don’t be hating me for it.
I am autistic. I am concidered “high-level functioning” but I don’t like drawing lines of seperation. I can be referenced to Asperger’s which is the autism you ask of. I therefor am an Aspie. We Auties are a community of people in many places online and in real life. You can view first hand how Auties think on Live Journal, Myspace, You Tube even. Just search for autism. We are not disordered or disfunctional. We simply function in a different way that NT’s don’t seem to understand. AutismSpeaks.org is insulting to us.
Stop trying to cure us or prevent us. We are of life which must be diverse in all aspects of being.
Autistics.org is a site created and managed by auties where anyone can post questions or comments in different categories pertaining to autism.

As for your question:
The generalizations of our categorized neurodiversity include but are not limited to:

Speech impediment or delay due to an incompatibility between our minds way of thinking and the processing of english to represent these thoughts.
The english language is insufficient for us.
Our minds do usually do not think in a voice as yours likely does. We see pictures and feel emotions and interpret things into rational and logical ideals that words hardly encompass.
It is far easier for us to type out our thought in a more “real-time” sense.
Some of us have to use “templates” or prepared speeches that we store in mind to call upon in common social situations, like at work or school.
I have an astounding memory and so can recall much of what I’ve read or seen and appear intelligent when speaking.
I learn best through example, like working along side someone experienced, I will absorb every bit and piece of knowlege, I will figure out in my mind why they do what they do and simultaneously see a better, more efficient way, and feel compelled to tell them.
For this reason I am often made a leader or teacher.
I am not good at these things though because I falter under social pressures from people who tend to feel like I am picking them apart or trying to be better than them. They usually don’t like that I move ahead so quickley when they have been there for so long.
I am often sabotaged or mobbed.
My weakness is through influence. People seem to know this often like it’s written on my forehead.
My subconcious is very open, which is nice when I decide what goes in and take out what I dont like there… But sometimes people sneak things in and It takes me weeks or months or even years to work them out.
When this happens I shut down.Sometimes everything in my whole life falls apart. I lose everything. This has happened many times in my life. Still I can get no help and have none take me seriously except for other auties.
Other Auties who were raised in better environments call these episodes “meltdowns” and have methods for dealing with them quickley. They also tend to have support for other people. I do not. I suffer much.
None in real life have ever understood me fully.
My body movements are awkward, my style is non existent. I fail to have personality except with few I have known long.
I am a caring and thoughtful person with much to offer and yet I cannot get help.
Professionals don’t believe an adult can be properly diagnosed to have asperger’s. They want to call me bipolar or schitzophrenic. Some people link these to autism.

I love chicken nuggets by the way.

I wish every day that I could do the things in life that I could do given the right environment. I set goals to try and acheive that environment on my own… But it is so difficult, and seems it might not happen in this life time. So I resolve to make things better for my children. And then I am concerned about actually producing children who may end up suffering as I.
My girlfriend (who at times seems to be on the spectrum, but believes she is something entirely different although similar in ways) and one only true real life friend wont accept the idea of me not fathering my own children.
While the government is trying to cure diversity, people like me could really benefit from their help, but they dont seem to understand. So many organizations, like autism speaks, use words like epidemic and horrible and just so many derrogative words that are not going to give us what we need… A place in society to belong and live well and prosper.
So many of us want to make things better… And we have the drive and the focus and the fixation… We can do such great things. I can do such greatness.
Meanwhile multibillionaires soak up the wealth of the world and rather than share amonst all life which deserves to live happy, they benefit with caretakers and live-in-home cleaners,
accountants, lawyers, doctors, chefs, personal trainers, luxury, comfort, convinience.
Anyone would want these things that few take for granted, but many auties actually need this type of life style because they cannot handle any of it. Any of it. Life alone in a world of such demand is burdensome to the extreme. I have nothing left for cleaning and eating right and exercising regularly and doing my taxes, or seeing the doctor… I can’t even remember to shower regularly. I put on the same old clothes because I havent had the chance to do laundry in weeks. I am not lazy… You should see how much of myself is given away every day.
And still they want more and more and as more people learn of me, they also want of me.
I absolutely have to have time to myself regularly to “reset” or I get very moody and feel unhealthy.
I am very good at math, both logical and theoretical.
I am also very prone to music. I can play instruments without “knowing” how. I sing but only other people’s songs.
At one time I went to kareoke every weekend and people cheered for me and made references to american idol… Until they saw me faltering. Now I can’t find the confidence to sing in public. But I still sing every day at home. And I record myself to improve and listen carefully to songs over and over and over for hours.
I often have ideas of inventions or improvements on products I use or see. Sometimes I see my ideas later. I want to experiment with self perpetuating electricity generators. I have several concepts in my mind that I would build prototypes to experiment with.
I have this opportunity where I’ve bought a house that my girlfriend’s parents needed to get rid of because they couldnt afford to have 2. I made a deal with her father to a personal, interest free morgage for 30 years. The house is worth 270k
I offered 350k at 1000 each month.
This house has two apartments, one built on the back -360 sq ft. And one in the basement about the same size. Both with bath and kitchen. I can rent them out for more than the morgage. I want to build a second floor addition ontop to double the value for about 60k and alot of hard work. Then I can use the equity to build another house from scratch and sell it. Then I can become a builder of custom homes of my own design. Something I also want to do. Eventually I could be paying others to run my company while I venture into an original resturaunt. I want to distribute unlimited free, and non-poluting energy to homes worldwide. I would probably die for trying to put oil companies out of business.
Either way this is all conceptual. In my reality it would take 3 lifetimes to accomplish because I have to work so much to afford what little I have. My limitations would be solved by financial aid.
But the government would rather pay scientists and organizations to experiment with medications and look at genes for a combination they can detect when its possible to abort.
How would that make you feel?
Guess what else. I also have recently discovered that smoking marijuana gives me relief.
The government could throw me in jail anytime for this, or for tax evasion over the last 10 years for not filing tax returns and working under the table. I have many outstanding debts totalling over 30k. I dont have the power to confont these problems when they first develop, and I certainly dont have the will to overcome them now that they have grown so much bigger. I can’t even talk about them out loud even when I reherse for weeks. The stress of thinking about it is too much. I will die in Jail.
There you have only a small generalized portion of an insight into the life of a person wth high level fuctioning autism.
I hope it satisfies your curiosity.

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Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Jenny asks…

5 year old’s social skills and behaviour?

Hello, i have a son who has just turned 5. He started reception this year. He is not very talkative, when it comes to having conversations. He has very good vocabulary but does not talk to his teacher or the children in his class. He is quite shy but most of the time i feel like he just cant be bothered. He never askes questions about others and just doesn’t seem interested in other children. He will shout for attention if he has something to show but not very interested in others talking. He is easily distracted in class and has to be told 5 times before he follows instructions even at home. He does not mean to misbehave and really hates upsetting others. If i ask him how his day has been, he will ignore him and if i keep asking he will say he doesn’t want to talk. He hates answering questions even at home and cries if you keep asking them. He is very sensitive and gets frustrated easily and cries easily. He is very capable of making friends but doesnt seem interested. He is also very bright and creative.
He did go to full time nursery last year and was the same. He would play for hours on his own in the sand pit or waterplay. He would only talk if he had something interesting to show. It’s funny because he does have the vocabulary. They noticed his creative skills at nursery too. I am very much in touch with his teacher and she has the same concerns, she has suggested his assessed and i agreed. He is very playful and talkative at home and has a great sense of humour. But even at home he hates being asked questions or having conversations that do not interest him.
He does show alot of asperger’s traits. Particularly his lack of social interaction. The confusing thing is he gets sarcasm too, for example if i say ‘thanks for making the mess’ he’ll say ‘sorry mummy’. Maybe that doesn’t mean much. I will definately have him evaluated, for my own peace of mind if nothing else.
He does show alot of asperger’s traits. Particularly his lack of social interaction. The confusing thing is he gets sarcasm too, for example if i say ‘thanks for making the mess’ he’ll say ‘sorry mummy’. Maybe that doesn’t mean much. I will definately have him evaluated, for my own peace of mind if nothing else.
He does show alot of asperger’s traits. Particularly his lack of social interaction. The confusing thing is he gets sarcasm too, for example if i say ‘thanks for making the mess’ he’ll say ‘sorry mummy’. Maybe that doesn’t mean much. I will definately have him evaluated, for my own peace of mind if nothing else.

admin answers:

It is very obvious to me that this is asperger’s syndrome. Suggest the O.A.S.I.S. Guide to asperger’s syndrome by Barb Kirby. It is part of the autistic spectrum. Many of those with asperger’s tend to have a higher IQ. Social skills are delayed and its something that you will continue to work on with him. Those with asperger’s follow rules well. A great book by Dr. Jed Baker is the social skills communication picture book that depicts the wrong way and then the right way. Suggest setting some rules like stop look and listen, inside voice. Yes those with asperger’s are very aloof.

That is very funny to me about him not wanting the questions about his day. My son, who is 8 and PDD.NOS (autistic features that include typical features, autistic and asperger features) says all the time, mom no more talking!

The not talking to anybody can be anxiety based too though his typical demeanor is shy. Getting frustrated easily and crying can be anxiety. Anxiety is a component that usually accompanies those on the autistic spectrum but it also stands by itself a lot too.

He thinks differently, and probably has some amazing art work.

The distraction and difficulty following directions:
Attention disorders do go hand and hand with those on the autistic spectrum as well.

Language disorders, especially pragmantic do roll with this diagnosis frequently too.

Auditory processing disorders also accompany the symptoms.

My son who is 8 has been diagnosed with all of these. Does he really have all of them, doubtful, but there is significant overlap.

He is diagnosed
PDD.NOS (atypical autism)
ADD.NOS (features of an attention deficit disorder)
CAPD (central auditory processing disorder)
Pragmatic disorder, mixed expressive and receptive language disorder

So does he really not understand spoken language (receptive) or is it the auditory processing?

Is he really ADD or is it bipolar, or SPD (which he has as well) sensory processing disorder or the CAPD

here is a good PDD assessment (PDD is the umbrella term that encompasses all of the autistic spectrum disorders)
http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html

SPD
http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/sensory-processing-disorder-checklist.html
the sand pit and water play, excellent, that is code for sensory processing, both are sensory based and he is giving his body what it needs, precisely what an OT would do for him

A pediatric neurologist is the way to go, developmental pediatricians don’t give as much feedback, child psychologists/psychiatrists-some are good, most are not and would try to convince you he needs medication and there is nothing here at all that suggests that to me.

Conversations are learned and it takes time. My 8 yr old loves to answer the phone, but continues to abruptly hang up on anyone that is boring him. He easily gets annoyed with chit-chat and I don’t get it myself being autistic as well. He asked me why is it that everybody everywhere always asks How was your day or How’s it goin but they don’t want the real answer. They want you to say fine, good, ok but if you tell them how you really feel they act as if you turned into a martian. Funny to me how someone with delayed social skills, who is poor at reading nonverbal behavior including facial expressions can get it and be so perceptive. And I have no answer for this, and feel its fake, yet its rude of us to ignore these q and not give the expected response.

For his day, ask specific questions and you will get a response and he won’t be agitated by it. Ask what was the letter of the day? What game did you play in gymclass? Who did you play with during free time/recess? My son’s favorite q is who got in trouble today? He loves to dish on who threw up, got hurt, said a bad word, broke a pencil etc.

The autism asperger’s publication co.
Http://www.asperger.net

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Robert asks…

Can someone please explain Autism to me? My son never lost his memory or language before!?

My three year old is speech and lanuguage delayed. They are testing him for Autism.

admin answers:

“What is Autism? An Overview

Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome. These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the Autism Spectrum Disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise Autism Spectrum Disorder, click here.

Autism Spectrum Disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.”

“Did you know…
1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism
1 in 94 boys is on the autism spectrum
67 children are diagnosed per day
A new case is diagnosed almost every 20 minutes
More children will be diagnosed with autism this year than with AIDS, diabetes & cancer combined
Autism is the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the U.S.
Autism costs the nation over $90 billion per year, a figure expected to double in the next decade
Autism receives less than 5% of the research funding of many less prevalent childhood diseases
Boys are four times more likely than girls to have autism
There is no medical detection or cure for autism”

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Sandy asks…

What is Autism can some one tell me?

Please explain in your own words then give me links thanks!

admin answers:

Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome (read more). These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the autism spectrum disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise autism spectrum disorder, click here.

Autism spectrum disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with autism spectrum disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Nancy asks…

what is autism some1 tell me cause its my project tell me smart person?

i need help

admin answers:

Autism speaks:
Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome (read more). These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the Autism Spectrum Disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise Autism Spectrum Disorder, click here.

Autism Spectrum Disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.

Very long but it will help you with your project.

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