Tag Archives: Asperger Syndrome

Question?: Asperger Syndrome Symptoms

Paul asks…

Can the severity of Asperger Syndrome increase over one’s lifetime?

I’m interested in psychology, and I was just thinking about this:
I read that sometimes people “grow out” of Asperger Syndrome, so I’m curious about the inverse case.
What I’m wondering is: Can someone start out having a relatively mild case, then over their teenage years it grows heavily in its severity?

admin answers:

Yes, this is what happened to me. The symptoms can grow become a lot more noticeable and cause more impairment. The teenage years are when social rituals and expectations start to change – socializing is based on chatting and hanging out instead of playing games. I had at least one friend for most of my childhood, but once I started middle school I couldn’t keep up socially, and it became very clear that I had trouble learning social skills. Also, I started struggling with anxiety and depression, which made it more difficult for me to interact with others.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Susan asks…

How to cope with my daughter with asperger’s being depressed?

My daughter, Elizabeth, was diagnosed with Asperger‘s Syndrome at age 6. She is now 16 years old. She’s been depressed because all these years, she’s never actually had a social relationship with others. She really wants friends. But, I don’t know were she can develop peer interaction with others now that school is out. Any tips on her coping with depression?

admin answers:

Look to the autism support network,there are kids with aspergers there and can help support each other.Can also get advice from adults with it.Look at the books Gut and psychology Syndrome and Balance Your brain balance Your Life,and look at reviews at Amazon.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Causes

Chris asks…

Does aspergers syndrome cause the person to become an asshole?

I dont feel like it should be a crutch to be a jerk!

admin answers:

Anybody can be an a**hole, even you, but being an Asperger doesn’t contribute toward this nor does it exclude. Being an a**hole or jerk is developed through nurture, Asperger’s comes through nature!

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Mary asks…

Does anybody know any friendship groups for adults with Asperger’s Syndrome?

Okay so somebody told me that there is a support group or whatever for people with Asperger‘s Syndrome. Do you know of a such thing?

admin answers:

There are good forums for people with Asperger’s syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders at http://www.wrongplanet.net

There you can talk to other adults who have it. I have found those forums very useful.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome

Carol asks…

what are the questions the psycheatrist make to a person to test asperger syndrome?

when a psycheatrist or a psychologist is testing asperger syndrome in someone, what are the questions they make to them?

admin answers:

I think they have a variety of questions that they follow according to their DSVM medical diagnoses book.

Here are a few sample questions they might ask:
-Do you like working with yourself or do you like working in groups?
-Do you often find yourself into one subject that you can’t stop talking or thinking about?
-Do you notice your arms or hands moving around when you want to communicate?
-When someone asks you to share a toy or chair you refuse to let them use what is considered yours?
-When someone is sad or lost a loved one, you show no empathy towards them.

If you find in most of these questions that are a YES, then that would be a key to what someone may have aspergers syndrome.

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Question?: What Is Autism

Helen asks…

What’s the different between Aspergers syndrome and Autism?

I’ve always known what autism is but until the other day I heard someone say about Aspergers syndrome, the symptoms are pretty much the same. What‘s the difference?

admin answers:

Basically asperger’s syndrome is a type of autism
these articles all explain the differences between the two

http://ezinearticles.com/?Understanding-The-Differences-Between-Aspergers-and-Autism&id=666875

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-difference-between-aspergers-and-autism.htm

http://medicine.wisegeek.com/are-aspergers-and-autism-the-same-disorder.htm

http://www.livestrong.com/article/87982-differences-between-autism-aspergers/

http://www.autism-world.com/index.php/2008/07/10/the-difference-between-autism-and-aspergers-syndrome-2/

http://www.disabledinfo.co.uk/dis/323-understanding-the-differences-between-aspergers-an.asp

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Causes

Charles asks…

what happens if someone with aspergers syndrome smokes marijuana?

i have a friend with aspergers syndrome and he wants to try smoking pot. will this affect him severely or screw his brain up even more. i really need to find out what will happen cause im really worried about what might happen

admin answers:

He might have some serious spasms. And you might get caught and go to jail!

Smoking pot is against the law, you know.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Symptoms

Ken asks…

What is holding intense grudges a symptom of?

Is it a symptom of a disorder, or anything, if a person holds lifelong grudges, even for slights or misunderstandings, even from childhood? Is it a symptom of aspergers syndrome?

admin answers:

Well what will happen with all of the unforgivingness and not letting it all go, it will all just pile up and in time it will come out in another way. Addiction, Obesity, Mental Problems, Health ect
There are recovery tools of the 12 step program that is not just for addicts, it is really good for everyone to learn how to let go and let God. The peace is awesome.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Quiz

Nancy asks…

What is it like having an autistic / asperger’s syndrome student in your class?

admin answers:

My mother works with autistic kids at an elementary school, and she says the three biggest issues are disruptions, accomodations, and acceptance. An autistic student may inadvertantly do or say things that are socially inappropriate, like taking another person’s toy without asking. The teacher may need to devote more attention to this student, which means less attention to other students. If the student receives accomodations, like having an education assistant in the classroom, this would draw attention to his differences. The other students may be jealous that the autistic student gets extra time on quizzes, or leaves the classroom sometimes to go to his social skills group, or whatever the case may be. And of course, some of the other students will not accept their autistic classmate as part of the class unit. They might exclude, tease, or bully him. Having an autistic kid in the class can be a very good thing, though. It exposes the students to different types of people, and teaches them about diversity, patience, and tolerance.

Each autistic person is different, though. The student’s personality and level of functioning affect what he or she is like in the classroom. I have Asperger’s, and I was always very well-behaved in class and polite to my classmates. My Asperger’s had little to no effect on my classmates; most of them probably never guessed I had a disorder. I’ve had classes with other people on the spectrum, though. Some kept to themselves and rarely said anything, some were disruptive and constantly in trouble, and some seemed a bit odd but mostly got along fine.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Treatment

William asks…

Can Aspergers Syndrome affect your Social health?

My therapist, mother, and father all suspect i have Aspergers Syndrome, but can it really affect your socializing? As well as A.D.D. and OCD? We all suspect i have all 3. And i’m feeling really depressed right know, so do you think so?

admin answers:

Yes, Asperger’s syndrome affects socializing, as it causes people to have poor social skills and a limited ability to develop good social skills.

Asperger’s syndrome varies a lot in severity though, so not everyone who has it will have the same level of difficulties with socializing.

Some people have mild Asperger’s syndrome and in those cases other people may not always notice much difference. Others have more severe forms of Asperger’s syndrome and cannot as easily mask or hide the disorder or the symptoms.

Some people with Asperger’s syndrome are lucky and are surrounded with people who don’t let the person’s poor social skills be a big problem, but a lot of people with Asperger’s syndrome are not that lucky and are constantly excluded and rejected by other people because of their poor social skills or simply for being different.

Many people with Asperger’s syndrome live in social isolation. Some of them don’t mind it and actually enjoy their solitary lives, while others are greatly bothered by this isolation and become really depressed.

I cannot judge whether you have Asperger’s or not, but it sounds like there is a reason to have a professional (a psychiatrist for example) do an evaluation to find out for sure. If you do have some disorder (or a combination of many disorders), a psychiatrist should be able to diagnose you and suggest treatment options.

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