Tag Archives: Act

Question?: Autistic Kids

Donna asks…

I have an interview to work with autistic kids, I totally dont know what2 expect, any ideas?

The interview is for 3 hours!! I don’t like not knowing what will happen in the interview. I would also appreciate any info on how to act around autistic kids, i have researched on the net but would appreciate first hand advice.
Thanks in advance! 🙂

admin answers:

I’ve done a similar interview and was given the job. I was a behavioural therapist for autistic children.

Ok so this is what happened to me.
My interview took the best part of a day. (actually it was a 2 part interview, with people who passed the first part called back for the second)

The preliminaries were covered.

They’ll ask you about your educational qualifications, previous work experience, why applied for the position. That was the easy bit.

Then in the afternoon, it was much harder. More practical based. We had to do play skills in front of the other applicants. For example we were given a simple toy (like a ball or spinning top), and told to make it appealing to the child. With the parents permission, autistic students at the school assisted in the application process so don’t be surprised if you are asked to do some real life one-on-one therapy in front others.

Goodluck xxxxxxxx

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Schizophrenia Test

John asks…

are there any blood test or brain tests for diagnosing schizophrenia?

or are they only based on symptoms?and can someone with schizophrenia act like a normal for a while and back to his symptomps again?

admin answers:

Diagnostic tests can only rule out other conditions. Schizophrenia is diagnosed based on a continuous display or reporting of the symptoms of schizophrenia over a period of time.

There are other disorders that are similar to schizophrenia. A brief psychotic episode, for example, will resolve itself, with the assistance of medication usually, after less than a month. However, schizophrenia itself comes in a variety of forms as well. “The course of schizophrenia varies greatly. Some people will have one brief episode and have no further problems during their lifetime. Others will suffer from the condition throughout much of their lives. Schizophrenia tends to be episodic.”

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Schizophrenia

Nancy asks…

My friend has schizophrenia and I want to know if she will ever act violent ?

Are schizophrenia people easy to get along with? Do schizophrenia people take orders well? Are schizophrenia people easy to control? Do schizophrenia people laugh loudly in crazy way?

admin answers:

They usually don’t take orders well,actually. And why would you want to control anyone? That is downright evil.

Violence amongst schizophrenics is actually quite rare. Still, i wouldn’t do anything to provoke anyone,regardless. It’s just not nice.

There is a stigma attached to this illness and you seem to have been taken in by that. Your friend is still the same friend you had before you found out about this. Be there for her,talk with her about things,and be good to her.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Treatment For Autism In India

Carol asks…

If parental uncle is eligible to avail deduction under IT Act for the amount spent on the treatment of niece?

parents of niece have been expired.She is minor and mentally retarded and fully depends upon me,.but does not have adoption/guardianship.If yes,under which section?

admin answers:

Under Section 80DD, total benefit/deduction available to the individual is a fixed sum of Rs 50,000. In case the disability is over 80%, this figure rises to Rs 75,000.

Section 80DD
Deduction under this section is available to an individual who:
Incurs any expenditure for the medical treatment, training and rehabilitation of a disabled dependant

“Handicapped dependant” means a person who – (i) is a relative of the individual or, as the case may be, is a member of the Hindu undivided family and is not dependant on any person other than such individual or Hindu undivided family for his support or maintenance.

The Rule 11A of IT Rule under Sub-rule 2 prescribes ”

(2) For the purposes of sub-section (4) of section 80DD and sub-section (2) of section 80U, the assessee shall furnish along with the return of income, a copy of the certificate issued by the medical authority,—

(i) in Form No. 10-IA-, where the person with disability or severe disability is suffering from autism, cerebral palsy or multiple disability; or

(ii) in the form prescribed vide notification No. 16-18/97-NI.1, dated the 1st June, 2001published in the Gazette of India, Part I, Section 1, dated the 13th June, 2001 and notification No. 16-18/97-NI.1, dated the 18th February, 2002 published in the Gazette of India, Part I, Section 1, dated the 27th February, 2002 and notified under the Guidelines for evaluation of various disabilities and procedure for certification, keeping in view the Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act, 1995 (1 of 1996), in any other case.

Thus for 80DD , there are two set of forms . One is the form 10-IA which is given in I T Rule . The other is for most of the other disabilities defined in the aforesaid notification published in the Gazette of India .It can be downloaded from here . In this notification , under Annexure B , following two types of forms are provided – one for mental retardation and other of other types of disabilities.

Http://www.taxworry.com/2008/01/where-can-i-get-prescribed-form-for.html

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Daniel asks…

What can I do to treat my Aspergers Syndrome?

I am 21 and was just diagnosed with Asperger‘s Syndrome. What can I do to help myself act more “normal” in social situations? I tend to look down when people are speaking to me, and have one – sided conversations on subjects I know a lot about and a talk to much. How can I help myself overcome a little bit of this?

admin answers:

There are lots of therapies out there to help you overcome some problems you may have in social situations. I would look online for local asperger support groups for adults. In the area where I live we have several social skills groups for persons with aspergers ones that are lead by medical professionals ( these usually cost a monthly fee) and ones that are run by a nonprofit support groups ( these are usually free) I would check online to see what is available in your area.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

How To Have A Meaningful Conversation With A Child On The Autistic Spectrum

In this article I am going to discuss how you can have a meaningful conversation with your child. I have broken down how to have a meaningful conversation with your child into a number of steps. These are outlined below.

The first step is to decide which way your child likes to learn new things. Are they a visual or verbal learner? By this I mean do they understand things better when they can see them rather than talking about them (visual learner) or do they learn best by talking and listening (verbal learner). Once you find this you will know which style to use to interact with your child so they will be more responsive to you.
Next you need to understand how your child “senses” the world around him or her. Do they experience sensory overload and if so what drives their senses wild? Or is your child under-sensitive thus requiring a lot of stimulation to get them to respond appropriately to you.
Once you are aware of any sensory issues that exist, you can give them better ways to cope such as speaking softly, allowing time for plenty of movement before asking a child to sit for dinner, giving your child a chair where they feel grounded and can put their feet on the floor etc.
You then need to look at how you act and talk to your child. If you want to have a meaningful conversation with your child your style needs to match your child’s needs. For example if you interact most with your child in a calm way, this is good for children who are oversensitive while this would not work well on children who need a lot of stimulation.
If you are animated and speak loudly to your child on the autistic spectrum, this would have a negative effect on a child who is oversensitive but would work well if your child is under-sensitive to movement, touch and sound. If your style is more directive then your child may be overloaded with questions and commands and may shut down. Alternatively they may respond well and follow your direction.
Alternatively is your approach one where you follow your child’s lead and take it from there. A good way to check is to simply test and see which works best if you are unsure.
When you know how your child learns and process information and when you understand which interaction style to use, you will then be able to interact at a deeper level with your child and have meaningful conversations between you.

Do you want to learn more about special needs parenting? If so, download my free guide here: http://www.parenting4specialneeds.com/
Orla Kelly is a special needs parenting coach, and can help you help your child.

View the original article here

Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical

Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical
Posted on Tuesday, March 13 @ 19:20:31 EDT by Social Skills Maja Toudal I met Maja (and a lot of other cool aspies) while speaking in ?rhus, Denmark at the AspIT conference. This is her first column:

Hi, I?m Maja and I live in Copenhagen, Denmark and I?m a 25 year old woman diagnosed with Asperger?s. I?m a singer/songwriter and a student.

I always knew I was different and started learning social skills before I was even diagnosed. When I was 12, I realized that I wanted to be a part of the world and started to mimic and learn social skills from others. Most of my social skills, however, come from character based roleplaying.

Many other aspies say that I bend to the will of NT society, by acting as if I am an NT. I, of course, don’t think so because I only act NT when the situation calls for it. But let’s start at the beginning. . . .

Read on. . .

Listen to a song by Maja entitled “That Moment”: ?????

I’ll keep my story somewhat short, in order to get to the point. Like many other aspies, I’ve known since very early childhood that I was not like the other kids. I ?ve felt different, weird, and it truly does feel like being on the wrong planet. For everyone else, the expectation that I behave as them was natural, and for me, impossible. I’m fairly sure that any aspie will know what it’s like.

Maja Toudal I think I first realized this when I was three or four years old.

I never went to special schools, or had any help. I wasn’t diagnosed until I was 16. So not only did others expect me to act ?normal?, I expected it of myself. It wasn’t until I was 12 or 13 that I realized that I would have to really work for it, if I was going to achieve it. Also, it wasn’t until then that I started wanting to be a part of society, after years of being bullied by classmates and teachers.

So I worked at it. I observed, tried to repeat what the others did and I failed miserably.

When I was 17 or so I got invited to play a roleplaying game, which has since become much more focused on character play than anything else. And that is where I really learnt something.

I see it as speaking two languages. To use a metaphor, I speak Danish and English. Danish is my native language, it’s the language I grew up speaking. Danish is good to be able to speak, because even though it’s a small country, it’s where I live. The relatively small number of Danish-speaking people, mostly prefer to speak Danish. And many of them don’t know English very well.

But lots of people in the world speak english, and most of them don’t know how to speak a word of danish. However, because I speak english so well, I’m able to share ideas with other people who speak English and befriend them. I’m able to translate danish for them, and even ? with those who are willing ? am able to teach them a bit of danish.

It’s exactly the same with the languages ?NT? and ?aspie?. There are lots of aspies in the world, but most people are NT’s. What I want to do with my life is reach out to the NT’s and teach them to speak a bit of ?aspie?.

I’m aware that many who are on the spectrum, have had horrible experiences with NT’s, and many see non-autistics as horrible people. We want to avoid them as much as possible. But the reason we have horrible experiences with NTs, isn’t necessarily because they or we are horrible people. It’s just that we have such a hard time communicating.

And that’s what I’m doing. I’ve learnt to communicate with neurotypicals. It gives them benefits ? because I’m slowly teaching them a new language that will make a few situations (or many) much easier, because they now understand a bit of what’s going on. And it gives me benefits ? because I’m able to tell them what I want, and need from them. I’m able to make friends with them.

And the NT friends I’ve made, have learnt to speak so much ?aspie?, that I no longer have to speak ?NT? with them if I don’t want to.

So it’s not about conforming to the NT way, it’s about communicating with them. And being able to communicate makes my life easier.

Maja Toudal Bubbles

Maja started writing songs when she was 9 and released her debut album, Live, Acoustic & Stripped less than a year ago. She has also released quite a few singles, available online.

Listen to Maja’s Music on Myspace and check her out on Facebook. and check out her music channel on Youtube.

Maja also has a youtube channel where she talks about Asperger’s and Autism.
               
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren’t responsible for their content.
No Comments Allowed for Anonymous, please register
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by dabih Saturday, March 24 @ 23:48:56 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) As a NT person with 2 family members diagnosed with ASD, I think that all of you, who tries to build the bridges between our two worlds and helps us (NTs) to understand you is doing a very important work. Thank you all.
I’ve been following TheAnMish vids for a while (and have one linked on my Aspergers YouTube playlist). I actually thought, “Wow. Maja looks quite a lot like her.” Then I saw the last link to TheAnMish channel. Heehee. I had no idea you were Danish – your English is pretty impeccable. Thank you so much for your Aspie vids, and now I have some good music to link to as well!
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by blitzmaedel Tuesday, March 20 @ 12:24:55 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I am much older and was not diagnosed until a few years ago. Asperger’s was not recognized in this country – the USA – until about 20 years ago. There is still no clinical support protocol for adults. Of course I understand perfectly about feeling like a stranger in a strange land all my life. In the past few years I have tried to discuss my condition with my family and peers, but they are ignorant of the autistic spectrum and don’t seem to much care. They have treated my attempts to speak about it with disinterest and sometimes derision. So a forum like this is still my only social outlet, other than facebook. After 30 years of struggling to survive in the job market with not much success, I retired early by going on Social Security Disability. I still feel guilty in my 50s about not working, but it has just never worked out very well for me, at least not for long.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by kellywilliams Thursday, March 22 @ 01:30:45 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) That’ll surely help. Great post. Thanks for the information.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by AScomposer13413 Thursday, March 15 @ 21:14:10 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Wow!! First off, I love the single! Sounds really cool!! As a composer with AS, I’ve always wondered where our impact on the music industry!! As well, I like the analogy about speaking “Aspie” with NT’s! Perhaps if most of us Aspies do that, the communication gap between us might get smaller and smaller!!
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by slave Thursday, March 15 @ 23:54:31 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message)
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by edgewaters Friday, March 16 @ 05:20:15 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Whole article seems a little too glitzed up and self-absorbed. Fashion photo shoots, a pop song. Seriously? As far as the premise of the article, I don’t agree with it. I don’t believe in acting in our personal relationships. It’s fake, phony, and most of all, an act of deception. I believe you should be what you are, in all that you do. To actually change what sort of person you are (to the degree this is possible) is one thing, to simply act as if you are someone else is another thing entirely. If some people don’t understand you – that’s their problem. My metric for success isn’t how accepted I am by other people, it’s how acceptable I am to myself.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Dogeasyfox Friday, March 16 @ 06:47:12 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Have to admit, Maja, you’re gorgeous!
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by musicforanna Friday, March 16 @ 07:58:45 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) As a 28 year old woman aspie, I’m not getting hung up like all the people who always bicker back in forth on the WP woman aspie articles about looks. Come on some of ya’ll. You’re totally missing the point. I guess you could say that I’m one of those “classically pretty aspie girls”. I’m not going to waste time posting pictures of myself, but if you could imagine a slender girl about 5’2″, naturally fluffy blonde hair, pale skin, small gray eyes, high cheekbones, with rectangular glasses, then you could imagine me and the way that I look. You may not realize it, but the implications play off differently because of looks. But not in the way you might think (i.e. looks alone won’t get you places unless maybe you act on it in a very ethically questionable way lol & unfortunately I have met a few of those in my life). I’m not sure if there is a way to necessarily for sure “look NT” but when you “look NT” You are pretty much expected to BEHAVE like these NT creatures. This is a pile of added stress that is ultra-annoying. Heck, if you’re mild enough like me, and you’re having a good day, & I have actually FOOLED people into thinking that I’m NT. Then of course I have those awful days where things come tumbling down and I shock people who thought I was NT and of course it’s always in the end, the battle of “do I let this person down later with my fail aspieness coming through after I make a very NT impression first, or do I announce upfront my aspieness to where they’re not caught off-guard by it, but they’ll probably think less of me because they haven’t known me long enough to perceive the real full picture of me?” And some days, it’s more exhausting than others to hold up “the NT end of the deal.” It really does drain me. But it’s how I can communicate with NTs, and unless I’m moving to a deserted island and becoming self-sufficient, I’m going to have to effectively communicate with NTs in some way or another throughout my life. And keep in mind, we’re seeing 3 pics of this woman, not how she would normally look or behave on a day to day basis. And these pics look professional to where you know she had hours of hair and makeup and prettyful wardrobe people beforehand (that, and don’t forget the nice cameras and equipment and editing that possibly went into these pics too). So try not to judge. I don’t always wear makeup, but every so often, I feel like doing so. I was also raised around a bunch of females. NT Females are the “social police” as we call to call them on the forum. So that already ups the expectation for me because of that. We have to remember that the spectrum pretty much runs the gamut. Sure there’s “pretty” people focused on in here from time to time, but you get everything from mild AS like me, to severely disabled Auties and everything in between along the way. I used to log into here more often, but I often feel depressed when visiting the forum because of the amount of gloom on there (I’m already trying to get away from my own gloom). I prefer IRC because it’s more enlightening. Other than living half a world away, It seems I have some in common with Maja. I never went to special schools (for me it was a string of urban public schools), I slipped through the cracks long enough, that I wasn’t diagnosed until I was 17 (of course, after that, my school pretended to “accommodate” for me and didn’t do that right until I got into college and they understood things properly). I pretty much had to “wing it” when it came to learning social skills too.
I’ve long related with the second language metaphor. Discovering I’m aspie in my thirties, I find it has been so long since I have spoken my native tongue that I don’t really know how any more. The constant acting has bred such a strong disconnect that I think getting in tune with my senses and increasing self-awareness must be the way to re-learn my lost language. please write more articles here.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Jack_the_First Friday, March 16 @ 19:33:55 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Very interesting and a pleasure to read, Maja. I’m new in here and starting to meet folks who have apparently managed to achieve a measure of success in their lives. By success, I mean as measured by quality of experience and relationships one manages to build. You have apparently bridged the “gap” and are seeing the benefits. Congratulations. I wish I could say the same. Growing up in Southwestern Arizona in the 1950’s as I did, AS was unheard of. I just knew that something was wrong, and so did everyone else, but no one knew what to do. As I grew older and started to make a living, I managed to learn (perhaps by imitation?) enough NT behavior to “pass for normal”, but not enough to be good at it. My life so far has been a long series of lost jobs, broken homes, and forgotten friendships. It’s only recently that an acquaintance suggested that I might be aspie. I’ve taken a few of the tests and passed every one so far. So, you’re fortunate – you have great looks, great talent, and the intelligence and persistence to build a formula for that success I mentioned at the top. I hope it continues for you, and that your critics realize that they may be using different, and possibly not valid, metrics to evaluate what they see of you here. The women who have weighed in by pointing out that they are treated differently have a good case. I’m not sure that’s much different from everywhere else. Well done, my dear. Enjoy the ride, and maybe even set an example for some of us.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Sappho17 Friday, March 16 @ 19:43:03 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I am an NT (as far as I know so far) who is on a mission to understand Aspies. I am particularly interested in the Empathy thing. I am working on a new paradigm for understanding how different minds can be respected in a Star Trek kind of way- That we might be different but who gets to judge? Spiritually, what is the meaning of all this? Maybe no one should judge and it’s just about awareness and acceptances of different versions of what it means to be human. I loved Spock growing up, but I am sure there would be a diagnosis for him in our narrow minded world-
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Dunzel Saturday, March 17 @ 00:11:28 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Thank you Maja. I completely agree with your approach. We exist in a 99%+ NT world. They didn’t choose to be NT nor we Aspies, yet the fact is that to succeed we either speak their language and mimic their culture or we can pout and moan about how “unfair” the world is. Of course the world is unfair, so what? As in any foreign land we learn the language, customs, and adapt or we fail. Side note, you are quite strikingly beautiful, which is a highly valued trait among NTs though I must admit I prefer your eloquence and intellect. In either case, play those cards for what they are worth as long as you can to open doors. Nothing is free in this world, and obstacles are easy to come by, so grasp the opportunities as they present themselves and enjoy your life. 🙂
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by JesseCat Saturday, March 17 @ 16:22:32 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Interesting metaphor and perspective. Also, lovely, lovely voice.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by LadySera Saturday, March 17 @ 21:13:08 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I’m a big fan of her YouTube channel. I think it’s great that she’s writing on here now. I knew when I saw her pics that some guys were gonna be P.O.d. I think there’s this huge thing where men who’ve been rejected automatically want to reject attractive women. I actually understand this coming from the other side (being rejected by men) but I try not to let it color my view of all men. I think that it would serve guys well to not just judge women based on their looks. Thanks.
I’m glad I read this article. Learning how to communicate with the NT’s is a vital skill to succeed in this world. I also tell people that so many creative people are in one way or another, autistic. The best part of this article, however is being introduced to new talent. I’m very impressed. Have you looked at CreateSpace.com to market your music. It is a great service that I used for publishing my book.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by pastafarian Sunday, March 18 @ 15:39:12 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Thank you for even trying to bridge build, sadly many people are bitter and they do not help us learn.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Surfman Sunday, March 18 @ 17:02:07 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I find a similarity with immigrants wanting to learn the new culture to fit in and become a westerner, while some immigrants will keep the old ways, and reject their new cultural demographic. The decision is based on many different things, but things happen because they can. If you are too old to learn you dont as your stuck in your ways. If the nuances and behaviours your considering emulating………. are ethically disturbing……… you may consider keeping your natural, current manners. I little different for aspies……. as a rule: aspies make awful actors and politicians, real estate salespeople and lawyers. Its much harder for aspies to act than just about anyone else. It requires guile. Which aspies have only in tiny amounts Capture bonding is more easily expressed in females than males, and females will emulate and bond with their captors better than males, and thus increase their survival breeding, and levels of happiness Going with the flow, rather than brushing someone up the wrong way……… has a daoist principle at play…..harmony is to be cherished for good health. Its good to learn to get a long with those around you, it can make life much easier if poisoned arrows from others are not forthcoming, as you have learnt the way of the peaceful warrior. A real danger is that inept actors get caught out and then bullied for not staying in their place……………………………………..
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Surfman Sunday, March 18 @ 17:03:36 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I find a similarity with immigrants wanting to learn the new culture to fit in and become a westerner, while some immigrants will keep the old ways, and reject their new cultural demographic. The decision is based on many different things, but things happen because they can. If you are too old to learn you dont as your stuck in your ways. If the nuances and behaviours your considering emulating………. are ethically disturbing……… you may consider keeping your natural, current manners. I little different for aspies……. as a rule: aspies make awful actors and politicians, real estate salespeople and lawyers. Its much harder for aspies to act than just about anyone else. It requires guile. Which aspies have only in tiny amounts Capture bonding is more easily expressed in females than males, and females will emulate and bond with their captors better than males, and thus increase their survival breeding, and levels of happiness Going with the flow, rather than brushing someone up the wrong way……… has a daoist principle at play…..harmony is to be cherished for good health. Its good to learn to get a long with those around you, it can make life much easier if poisoned arrows from others are not forthcoming, as you have learnt the way of the peaceful warrior. A real danger is that inept actors get caught out and then bullied for not staying in their place……………………………………..
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by johnsmcjohn Monday, March 19 @ 00:30:43 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I first saw Maja when I was researching Asperger’s last year. I subscribe to her youtube channel and recommend everyone here do the same. She is wonderful at explaining how Aspies think and what it’s like to be an Aspie in terms anyone can understand.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by BuyerBeware Monday, March 19 @ 02:45:31 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) There’s no point in debating the pros and cons. There’s only one choice: Blend in or be destroyed. “Destroyed” can take many forms: Shunned, demonized, chronically unemployed until you end up a mumbling homeless junkie, taking it all until you finally lose your temper and end up in prison, driven to depression and agoraphobia until you finally ask for help and end up drugged out of your brain, misdiagnosed as bipolar or schizophrenic, subsequently declared incompetent and drugged out of your brain to spend the rest of your life shuffling from one mental health facility to another always waiting on your next placement, or (probably second most common, following being drugged until there isn’t a person left) finally driven to suicide. Resistance is futile: Assimilate or be destroyed. Human nature. There’s no point in acting all Aspie and debating the rightness or fairness of that simple fact, either. It is a fact, a law of human nature, like GRAVITY. We do not debate the fairness of gravity. It simply IS. Assimilate or be destroyed. It is simply a fact. To choose not to accept it is to choose destruction.
I’ve only recently discovered who Maja is and I’ve started to watch her videos and I think she’s wonderful. She’s a inspiration to all us Aspies, she’s beautiful, she’s talented and she proves that despite being a Aspie we can be successful.
I’ve only recently discovered who Maja is and I’ve started to watch her videos and I think she’s wonderful. She’s a inspiration to all us Aspies, she’s beautiful, she’s talented and she proves that despite being a Aspie we can be successful.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Pajarito Monday, March 19 @ 23:21:25 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I don’t get it. Acting aspie/NT I get, but not speaking aspie/NT. Example?
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by GrungeFlannel Tuesday, March 20 @ 02:38:26 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) So let me get this straight. A “neurotypical person” is a normal person who does not have aspbergers? So what is an aspbergers according to the medical feild? A mental disorder? Well of course we need to recognize our social and mental differences here I being a high functioned person with asbergers would be ashamed at calling my mother a derogatory remark that makes people little, and inferior to us as called “neurotypicals” which is a blatant insult. So yeah, I do consider myself not special but with special talents and needs. But I sure don’t consider myself “inferior” or “superior” to people with different thinking paths. What about people with asbergers who are not as coherent as me? Should I call them “inferio-aspi” for short? Gosh. Come on people.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 2, Interesting)
by sunshower Tuesday, March 13 @ 20:59:49 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I like your article! We have a lot in common. I often have used the same “languages” metaphor for speaking Aspie versus NT, and had a lot of the same things happen at the same ages you listed here. I am a singer and songwriter also.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 0, Flamebait)
by aussiebloke Tuesday, March 13 @ 21:17:42 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Where are all the ugly, overweight and uneducated autistics who are also loathed by their family’s? Seems they don’t exist in autiverse. Another one to make the loser Autistics feel like &*^% Is that the point of autism TV ? Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by fraac Tuesday, March 13 @ 21:48:30 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by Aimless Tuesday, March 13 @ 22:35:44 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by Lonermutant Wednesday, March 14 @ 03:21:09 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by kojot Wednesday, March 14 @ 06:01:01 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by myth Wednesday, March 14 @ 09:56:29 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by AnnettaMarie Wednesday, March 14 @ 12:21:01 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by justkillingtime Wednesday, March 14 @ 13:11:04 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by sparklefish Wednesday, March 14 @ 22:07:31 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by DC Thursday, March 15 @ 11:43:46 EDT
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical by DC Thursday, March 15 @ 11:43:46 EDT

Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Briana_Lopez Tuesday, March 13 @ 22:23:44 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Your story in a way kind of sounds like mine! For the most part, I’ve learned to understand NT’s just by observing them and fixing each of my mistakes. And you’re a really talented singer! I might just have to be your new #1 fan 😀
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 3, Informative)
by techstepgenr8tion Tuesday, March 13 @ 22:43:37 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I don’t agree with people who feel like its flat out shameful or supplicant to meet NT’s halfway or to behave like one around them. Like you I spent most of my life checking my subtle behaviors, seeing what I could fix, bend, manipulate, rearrange, etc.. I don’t think it was until I was 20 that I really started understanding the NT mindset in a more comprehensive way and how to put on sort of a….facsimile?…. ie. something to express my thoughts and intentions in a way that they’d understand it. I went through a funny experience as well – ie. I was dx’d at 11, got a horrible message from the doctors about my future, had guy friends who essentially helped save me from the mess that I was in and by 19 or 20 I had a spell where my believe that I had anything was essentially revoked. Around that time I truly believed that if I really took a close look at the NT’s around me that I’d see traits that I liked, traits that reminded me of my best self, and that there was essentially an NT ‘me’ inside that just hadn’t had the plaster chipped away. Like anyone else on spectrum who has a while of thinking that, I found out that’s not the case, however I did learn a great deal from a lot of the rigors that I put myself through on it. IMHO its a really complicated world, NT’s have enough trouble understanding each other as it is, people have patience that are worn thin by a souring global economy and all kinds of other strange things going on, not to mention whatever hours they need to put in. They really might not have much left over for us in that sense and it seems like the better we can fend for ourselves and the better we can phrase ourselves their way on their turf the more likely it is that we can succeed, not only at life but making our case on what ASD is and what its about (effective communication skills are critical here).

Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Agemaki Wednesday, March 14 @ 01:05:06 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I think I’ve always liked to role-play but I don’t see it as a way of fitting in or learning to communicate with others. I’ve found that people aren’t as mean as they were in junior high/high school. I’m not attacked or the target of verbal aggression at least. I still don’t have much interest in making friends with most of my peers even though they are now relatively nice to me. I think a lot of this is because I prefer intellectual discussions and the sharing of ideas to other forms of discussion. I do enjoy meeting and sometimes befriending people with whom I can share ideas. Still, looking normal is just something I never think about. Some people will yell rude things at me when I use my umbrella on sunny days but I’m learning to have a stronger sense of self, placing my own visual comfort before a cultural concept of the proper and improper times to use umbrellas. Living in Japan also helped with that, since my tendency to avoid exposure to sunlight looked completely normal there. As I’ve learned more about variations on proper behavior from one culture to another I’ve come to see concepts of normalcy to be somewhat fluid and thereby I feel less bound to conform to the views of the culture that I happened to be born into.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by CyclopsSummers Wednesday, March 14 @ 02:01:59 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message | Journal) While I appreciate her initiative of trying to bridge the gap of communication between autistics and non-autistics, because I think mutual understanding is very important per individual situation, I should also wish the distinction between autistic/not autistic would not be presented as a binary thing. I say this because, aside from auties and aspies, there are still many others who aren’t autistic but struggle in their own way in this world, for example people with ADD, epilepsy, chronic migraines, Tourette’s, et cetera, some of which may also overlap with autism. I think the world isn’t taylor-made for anyone, and while it absolutely isn’t too much to ask that other people show some consideration and understanding toward us, it also goes the other way, and communication is honestly different on an individual level. Diffuse, not binary. This being said I repeat that I like Maja’s take on autism in general, and her apparent proactive stance in ‘dealing’ with it, for lack of a better word. So, I’ll hope she’ll get far with making music.

Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by jojobean Wednesday, March 14 @ 02:51:00 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I feel the same way, and had similar experiences. I can speak both NT and Autie (I am an autie, not an aspie) and I have learned the dance the social dance through observation and trial and many errors. I also agree that this does not make me any less autistic than hearing aids make me less deaf. Yes hearing aids help me hear, but the deafness is still part of me. I take my hearing aids out and I am deaf again. I use communication tools likewise to help me “hear” NT. When I hear better, I speak better. Also I like to see myself as a bridge between Aspie/Autie and NT. Jojo
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by MathGirl Wednesday, March 14 @ 04:10:28 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message | Journal) I can’t really identify much. I grew up not knowing about my diagnosis, either. I think my parents wanted to hide it from me for a purpose. But I was never really able to learn to fit in to this extent. I can act somewhat normal for, maybe, an hour, but I still don’t connect with people and then I go home and I’m utterly exhausted for the rest of the day. I don’t feel it’s worth it and I hate it. I despise this acting with all of my heart. Being able to be my true self is what I am fighting for. I feel like I have the right to be myself provided that I am respectful to other people, have genuine intentions, and contribute positively to the society. I am wary of getting close to NTs because I can’t read them. They often respond to my questions in a very vague, roundabout way. I am easy to take advantage of. I guess my brain just can’t take the concept of a nonverbal cue and generalize it to other situations. I still have trouble processing the concept of different minds, too, and it’s not something I can think of in a fluid social situation. I tend to be really deep in my head and I revel in my thoughts as I express them to people verbally. I enjoy reciprocal verbal interactions as long as they are not full of personal questions (which feels invasive) and as long as the message is clearly conveyed… and as long as it relates to my special interest. However, putting myself in NT social situations makes me feel shitty to the core because I can’t help but sense a disconnect in my communication style from their communication style. And I’m more aware of my sensory/content-processing differences now than ever before, having had things pointed out to me directly. Which makes me even more hesitant to go down that path unless I openly present myself as autistic which takes away the burden of trying to pretend to be NT. And this has been largely successful for me so far.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Ai_Ling Wednesday, March 14 @ 04:27:01 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I like your youtube channel. I’m not exactly sure what you mean by speaking aspie? Communicating with poor eye contact and rambling off monotone on your favorite obsessions? For me acting “aspie” for me means being mostly antisocial because I’m often muddled in confusion/uncomfortable with my settings.
Nice to meet you, Maja! I listened to your single – you’re very talented and thanks for sharing your music and your bio. I like that the Wrong Planet is featuring ‘real-live’ Aspies – we tend to break the mold, yes?
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by kojot Wednesday, March 14 @ 05:58:12 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Excellent article! Thank you. It’s kind of funny ’cause yesterday I was thinking about this stuff. That we’re more like just different cultures than anything else.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Zavaros Wednesday, March 14 @ 09:01:55 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I can really relate to what you have written, in fact, I may even use your metaphor to help explain my situation to NT’s. Thank you 🙂
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Chrism929 Wednesday, March 14 @ 11:18:52 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Intriguing, but I’d much rather learn exactly how she managed to learn what she did so that maybe I could use some of that knowledge even at this late stage in my life to communicate better with NTs. Someone commented there are different modes of acting, some more authentic than others, and that sounded very right to me. This is an subject I would like to learn more about from someone who has figured it out and I hope Maja will share more details of her learning process with us in the future. Good points were made by all those who complain of the glitz in role models here. I can share from experience that it’s a lot easier for a pretty young female to be accepted and thus navigate social channels – I’ve been there; am no longer, due to both major facial injuries and, now, age – but in my case it was a lifetime before I could have the benefit of this Different Planet sort of perspective on what I was, where other people were coming from, and what was happening. All I knew for most of my life was that inside, I was different. In retrospect much of the acceptance I had when I was young and attractive was meaningless but I didn’t understand that at the time, so many of my relationships were confusing and painful. I wasn’t vain so I didn’t understand that looks were so important to other people; I thought they liked me for who I was. Maja has done a wonderful job of working to overcome her difficulties as an Aspie, and thus feels her relationships/communications are more authentic. because of her acting efforts and learned skills. Maybe she’s right. Only she will know, with more time. But you can’t tell the young that. I found this article very interesting because I;ve often had the thought, in my life, that I wished I knew how to be an actor, so I could just manage situations and charm people without my soul being out there for anyone to take pot shots at; I never figured out how, though. My shyness kept me from exploring that as the only way I knew to study acting was to take classes. Anyway for me, it was more important to be real and I believed the two were antithetical. I always had the fortune to have one or two close friends who tolerated my eccentricities (and vice verse) so that’s what’s really gotten me through life, more any any skills like acting, no matter that I’ve always worked hard to understand what was going on with NTs. You act, of course, but perhaps learning actual acting skills would make that much easier? It’s very irritating to be confronted constantly by speakers-for-Aspies who are already successful (or present themselves as such) and, yes, glitzy and young – something most of us can never be even if we tried, and while the glitz can be maintained (at what cost?) the youth will go and then you get a very different view of life as people will treat you very differently. But, again, you can’t tell the young that. So, again, I hope Maja will give some practical tips on how she got where she is, communications-wise, that might be useful for others to try out.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Awiddershinlife Wednesday, March 14 @ 13:02:11 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I really do not see how a polarizing topic such as ?Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical? can be helpful to anyone. After all ?only a Sith deals in absolutes (Obi-Wan Kenobi)?. ?Many other aspies say that I bend to the will of NT society, by acting as if I am an NT? I assume that Maja?s critics must be ?acting Aspie? to engender such sentiment. Why are any of us acting? Other than it taking a lifetime of seeking wisdom, what is wrong with any of us simply becoming more authentic yet flexible enough to share this world with others while maintaining a measure of contentedness? Why would we begrudge Maja or any of our fellow aspies SUCCESS? My diagnosis has never gotten me an iota of assistance or compassion, so I have learned through many tough lessons that the world will not bow down to my specific needs, though I have learned to negotiate to get them reasonably well while remaining truly and uniquely me. It has taken me nearly 60 years to get this far, but I am glad to be on this pathway. I agree that ?It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a profoundly sick society (Jiddu Krishnamurti)?, but until I win a lottery big enough for me to totally isolate myself from any part of society that does not suit me (and I do buy lottery tickets to that end), I need to deal. One of the reasons I don?t hang tight with the Aspie community is that I have felt a strong expectation of conformity to ideas, politics, behavior, attitudes. Expression of differing viewpoints is generally not well tolerated. Could this be core to the accusations against Maja? I have been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome twice, once by a state mental health organization, then by a university researcher. It has helped me in my journey toward self-enlightenment, but it is not my identity. I remain a unique individual who totally embraces Aunt Frances Owens exclamation, ?My darling girl, when are you going to understand that being normal is not necessarily a virtue? It rather denotes a lack of courage (Practical Magic)! So Maja is not a ?normal? aspie any more than she is a ?normal? NT ? She is a woman of courage and to be admired for it!
i’m going to be honest about my reaction to the article. i am slightly uneasy when i am repeatedly faced with photos that look like stereotypical fashion models when i login to WP. i am a feminist and in my own ideology i take issue with the fashion industry. so when i see WP inundated with pictures of women who fit the fashion stereotypes it seems like a recipe for aspie girls to feel bad about themselves if they don’t look like that. success in the real world is something that aspies may or may not want to aspire to, but linking it with hotness gives mixed messages. using conventionally attractive women like this as an example is a way of impressing the NT community and also giving members some eye candy. but at what cost? we have a responsibility to our members to be conscious of the image we project INWARD, not just the image we project OUTWARD. even in the comments here i see the impact – girls and women are influenced by the message and seem to see beauty as something to align themselves with. how many females would be “identifying” with this article if the writer was not attractive according to society’s standards?
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by autti34 Wednesday, March 14 @ 17:32:08 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) i have autism an never can pass for nt .i think it funny when my aspie friend think they can pass for nt as most of them cant eathir they think there playing a game call i got a sercret but usly there the only one playing that game i think most of us on the asd with autism like me or as cant pass unless there very mild an then may come off quricky .
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by minervx Wednesday, March 14 @ 21:18:00 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I congratulate Maja on her success integrating. I find it better learning how to be NT than to simply sit alone and blame NT’s for our problems.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by The_Face_of_Boo Thursday, March 15 @ 10:05:22 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) So you are the new Alex’s g….. Nahh, you’re too out of his league.
I think being able to act like others when the situation calls for it is very helpful. We’ll always feel most comfortable on here though.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Freak-Z Thursday, March 15 @ 13:00:04 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Why are there so many pics? oh wait never mind….
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by rondeau Thursday, March 15 @ 13:03:14 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) My use of this metaphor started quite young. My interest was that one does need to function and/or get anything done in this or any society. My interest was not to change myself or make myself more acceptable for others not like me. Quite frankly, I had sufficient data to satisfy me that their goings on were inefficient, way too self centered, and contained way too much unnecessary drama. However, in order to get what I want out of life, I would have to learn how to at least appear like the sheep on this planet. (quote: humans are the only species that claims a god, but acts like there isn?t one.) So the role playing model was very beneficial in somewhat fitting in. Of course, you could dig your heels in and hold out for what might be perceived as fair?good luck with that. Take for example GIRLS who represent the largest oppressed group on the planet. Options for them have only come forward in the last fifty years. Throughout history they had a choice to submit or not and depending what country, ?not? was met with varying degrees of exclusion including exclusion from the planet. So I?m a strong believer that we can be ourselves and develop functionality among those that are so not like us?LOL.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Voyageress Thursday, March 15 @ 15:39:24 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I’ve kinda skimmed most of the comments posted, but they seem to be either an attack on Maja’s appearance or a typical male response on her looks. Come on – stop having a go. One major issue that Aspergirls are up against on a daily basis is that their behaviour doesn’t match up to the social expectations of their appearance. In my own experience, even though I match the social norms of beauty, it’s my behaviour that marks me as ‘abnormal’. On first meeting (whether in a social or work situations) people expect me to behave in a certain way. After several interactions my differences become blatantly obvious. And then when I did see a specialist in AS and autism they said I didn’t look like a person with either condition citing Wendy Lawson as an example. No disrespect to Wendy, but I am more like Rudy Simone (and this expert had not heard of her). Regardless of how we look on the scale of perceived attractiveness, us Aspergirls are up against a constant struggle of societal norms that affect every one of us every single day.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by zzmondo Thursday, March 15 @ 15:52:39 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Great article! I’ve always thought that there was a hard time between communication of aspies and neurotypicals. I like what you are doing. I’m communicating with more neurotypicals as well and am trying to be around more people and feel comfortable.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Caugustus Thursday, March 15 @ 15:58:25 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I really dislike the language metaphor of interacting with NT. From my own experience, communicating with NTs was acting. I would invent a NT character. While my character had success with people, it was still a character; it was never me. Eventually the curtains would close, the show would end and my aspie self would go home alone. Night after night, people would applaud my NT character but day after day my aspie self was ignored and alone. Language (and culture) is an artificial human creation to classify others as “different” It is largely used to justify war, unfair dealings and various -isms. If you take away language Danes and Americans are both human beings. They have the same emotional, physical and metal needs. Ultimately, the language difference is as limiting as a change of clothes (okay, its a little harder, but my point stays the same.) Aspies/ autistics however are fundamentally different. (Almost a different species as opposed to a different language or culture) Even if we do learn the language or change the clothes, on the inside we are still aspies. We still will have connection issues. An Aspie who can not make friends or connect with people will not connect or make any real friends no matter what language he or she speaks, be it Danish, English, NT, Aspie or even Klingon.
adidas f50 adizero leather (Score: 1)
by soccershoes1 Wednesday, March 28 @ 04:03:05 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Writing research reports for nike ctr360 maestri or work is often found far more difficult than it need so be. The following article offers some excellent advice on how to make the task easier and the report more impressive and effective. Whether you write a research nike mercurial black for a college professor or for a demanding boss in your profession, the author’s advice will put you well on your way to becoming a skillful report writer. A surprising amount of his time as a student and nike mercurial vapor superfly is spent reporting the results of one’s research projects for presentation to teachers, managers, and clients. Indeed, without basic research skills and the ability to present research results clearly and nike mercurial vapor 3, an individual will encounter many obstacles in school and on the job. The need for some research-writing ability is felt nearly equally by college students in all cheap nike mercurial, engineering and science as well as business and the humanities. Graduate study often makes great demands on the students-writing skills, and most professions continue the demand; education, advertising and nike ctr360 maestri elite, economics and accounting, science and engineering, psychology, anthropology, the arts, and agriculture may all require regular reporting of research data. The standard research report, regardless of mercurial victory fg or the intended reader, contains four major sections. These sections may be broken down into a variety of subsections, and they may be arranged in a variety of ways, but they regularly make up adidas f50 of the report. Problem Section. The first required section of a research report is the statement of the problem with which the research project is concerned. This section requires a precise statement of the underlying question which adizero f50 prime has set out to answer. In this same section there should be an explanation of the significance — social, economic, medical, psychological, educational. Why adidas f50 leather was worth conducting. PZZ
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by whiteflower Thursday, March 29 @ 18:40:54 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) really good article, I can totally relate I’ve felt so different from most people and still do. It is important for Nts to be informed and so we have to be able to tell them about who we are and our experiences.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by melisa27 Thursday, April 05 @ 11:00:16 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message | Journal) I give you props for posting and spreading the message loud an clear about possibilities with those more open-minded. Sadly most individuals whom are both genders still lack the respect of there fellow Nt peers and the community itself. And I’m so sick of disclosing myself most of the people whom worked with me suggest that I SHOULD but I say “screw your opinion” if we all want to be liked for whom we ‘really’ are then these people that we have an interest in shall be entitled.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by BeauZa Friday, April 13 @ 22:24:54 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I’ve watched a sprinkling of your videos here and there; your English vocabulary is so stellar that you could’ve tricked me into thinking you were American.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by LouG Thursday, April 19 @ 20:49:17 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message | Journal) Pretty amazing ability to communicate. I was getting goose pimples. I haven’t listened to your song yet, computer speakers are shot. probably tomorrow but if your singing is anything like your posts, wow. thank you
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by RobotGreenAlien2 Monday, April 23 @ 19:18:08 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) It’s an 99% NT world. Moaning wont change that. Many actualy do want to understand but you have to help them. I don’t see it as burying who I am. I see it as translating myself to bring out who I am quirks and all.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Seventh Wednesday, April 25 @ 04:49:39 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I didn’t find out about Aspergers until last year and was diagnosed last year. Until I understood this aspect of myself I spent an enormous amounts of energy throughout my whole life trying to understand, conform and fit in with neurotypicals. The biggest con is that it is, above all, very very mentally exhausting.
This is the right attitude. My only question is how to act around curebies? (I can’t stand them).
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Givemetaco Wednesday, May 09 @ 18:18:31 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Wow, you are unique and incredible. I’ve done some similar stuff. I do songwriting too on my electric and classical guitar. I don’t sing too much. I’m a 16-year old kid and I’ve been diagnosed about when I was 11. How I get NT’s to speak “aspie” to me: I can’t. I have to speak NT. But what really helped was sports, travel and empathy. I joined the track team 3 months ago and I’ve been able to communicate easily with them. I understand if they are talking about some sports team or even some musicians or places we have traveled. Seriously, almost everybody on my track team that I talk about can’t tell if I am an Aspie.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by TrudyG Saturday, May 12 @ 12:54:50 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Quite liked this article. I think it’s very true, and brings up a good point about “conforming to” versus “communicating with”. The goal is communication. Also have to say that the song attached to this article is quite nice; I enjoyed listening to it. Thank you! And as your first reply said, thank you for working on building the communication between ASD and NT communities.

View the original article here

Should An Autism Teacher Show Students How To Lie?

An autism teacher has a truly awesome job, one not to be taken lightly. Autistic children need a tremendous amount of attention and instruction — not necessarily just in the basics like reading, writing and arithmetic, as those are skills that all students at all levels need to know, but in other skills that you may not find specifically written down in the curriculum — social interactions.

You need to understand that autistic children, for the most part, are not stupid or even dumb. In fact, many studies and tests have concluded and come to realize that autistic children are generally some of the smartest children in the school, at least from an academic standpoint. Many of them will learn quickly if the autism teacher has employed the right kind of teaching aids and approaches that are required when teaching children with autism.

But where these types of students need the most help is with social interactions. For whatever reason, their social skills are severely impeded and they need instruction and repetitive teaching to help them understand how to act, behave and react in today’s society. One of the ways these types of students seem to learn best with the most retention is by example, and not to anyone’s surprise, the typical example they examine and view as a role model is their autism teacher, which puts an additional load of responsibility on that teacher.

You may think that these students only learn in the classroom but that is far from the truth. Yes they learn in the classroom but they also learn a great deal outside the classroom, and since they usually live in the some city or general area, they will frequently see their autism teacher out and about, and will continue to see them as an example or role model to be following and imitating.

While most autism teachers take their responsibility seriously and recognize this fact, there are some, as shown clearly in this case study, who should not be teaching autism because their life outside of the classroom is NOT something that should be viewed by anyone as an example or a role model. As an analogy, how much respect would you have for a priest who is seen most evenings very drunk in a local bar? Would you be inclined to become a member of that church in that case?

Children are incredibly perceptive, particularly autistic children, and they see, observe, internalize and contemplate much more than we usually give them credit for. When they observe their autism teacher lying to another teacher, or continually complaining to others about the behavior or actions of another teacher, what is that telling them? It tells them that such behavior is fine and acceptable. When the students see their autism teacher being “flirty” with virtually anyone who comes into the classroom or even outside the classroom, those actions are teaching the student that such things are acceptable and should be done as a part of everyday life. What message is being given to that autistic student when they observe their teacher locked in a passionate embrace in the school library with someone else that they recognize is not the spouse of their teacher?

Perhaps there are some non-teaching professions where the Jekyll/Hyde nature of a person does not impact other people, but for an autism teacher, such behavior should be considered unacceptable, as those observations from the autistic student are sending conflicting messages to that child, only serving to further confuse them as to what is right and acceptable in today’s society.

How much do you really know about your child’s autism teacher? Perhaps they appear to do a good job in the classroom, but as this case study demonstrates, appearances can be as deceiving as this type of autism teacher. Are they a totally different person outside the classroom? And if so, how long do you think that somebody leading such a “double standards life” can be successful at keeping those lives separate and distinct, while their life as a role model is sending entirely the wrong message to any students who observe them?

If you have not gotten to know your child’s autism teacher, there may be a huge something that you are missing, and actually discover that this is not the type of person that you want to be seen as a role model for your autistic son or daughter. To read the entire case study and to get more insights about autism in children, please visit our web site at http://www.autism-explained.com/selecting-the-right-autism-teacher-for-your-child/

View the original article here

Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical

Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical
Posted on Tuesday, March 13 @ 19:20:31 EDT by Social Skills I met Maja (and a lot of other cool aspies) while speaking in ?rhus, Denmark at the AspIT conference. This is her first column:

Hi, I?m Maja and I live in Copenhagen, Denmark and I?m a 25 year old woman diagnosed with Asperger?s. I?m a singer/songwriter and a student.

I always knew I was different and started learning social skills before I was even diagnosed. When I was 12, I realized that I wanted to be a part of the world and started to mimic and learn social skills from others. Most of my social skills, however, come from character based roleplaying.

Many other aspies say that I bend to the will of NT society, by acting as if I am an NT. I, of course, don’t think so because I only act NT when the situation calls for it. But let’s start at the beginning. . . .

Read on. . .

Listen to a song by Maja entitled “That Moment”: ?????

I’ll keep my story somewhat short, in order to get to the point. Like many other aspies, I’ve known since very early childhood that I was not like the other kids. I ?ve felt different, weird, and it truly does feel like being on the wrong planet. For everyone else, the expectation that I behave as them was natural, and for me, impossible. I’m fairly sure that any aspie will know what it’s like.

I think I first realized this when I was three or four years old.

I never went to special schools, or had any help. I wasn’t diagnosed until I was 16. So not only did others expect me to act ?normal?, I expected it of myself. It wasn’t until I was 12 or 13 that I realized that I would have to really work for it, if I was going to achieve it. Also, it wasn’t until then that I started wanting to be a part of society, after years of being bullied by classmates and teachers.

So I worked at it. I observed, tried to repeat what the others did and I failed miserably.

When I was 17 or so I got invited to play a roleplaying game, which has since become much more focused on character play than anything else. And that is where I really learnt something.

I see it as speaking two languages. To use a metaphor, I speak Danish and English. Danish is my native language, it’s the language I grew up speaking. Danish is good to be able to speak, because even though it’s a small country, it’s where I live. The relatively small number of Danish-speaking people, mostly prefer to speak Danish. And many of them don’t know English very well.

But lots of people in the world speak english, and most of them don’t know how to speak a word of danish. However, because I speak english so well, I’m able to share ideas with other people who speak English and befriend them. I’m able to translate danish for them, and even ? with those who are willing ? am able to teach them a bit of danish.

It’s exactly the same with the languages ?NT? and ?aspie?. There are lots of aspies in the world, but most people are NT’s. What I want to do with my life is reach out to the NT’s and teach them to speak a bit of ?aspie?.

I’m aware that many who are on the spectrum, have had horrible experiences with NT’s, and many see non-autistics as horrible people. We want to avoid them as much as possible. But the reason we have horrible experiences with NTs, isn’t necessarily because they or we are horrible people. It’s just that we have such a hard time communicating.

And that’s what I’m doing. I’ve learnt to communicate with neurotypicals. It gives them benefits ? because I’m slowly teaching them a new language that will make a few situations (or many) much easier, because they now understand a bit of what’s going on. And it gives me benefits ? because I’m able to tell them what I want, and need from them. I’m able to make friends with them.

And the NT friends I’ve made, have learnt to speak so much ?aspie?, that I no longer have to speak ?NT? with them if I don’t want to.

So it’s not about conforming to the NT way, it’s about communicating with them. And being able to communicate makes my life easier.

Maja started writing songs when she was 9 and released her debut album, Live, Acoustic & Stripped less than a year ago. She has also released quite a few singles, available online.

Listen to Maja’s Music on Myspace and check her out on Facebook. and check out her music channel on Youtube.

Maja also has a youtube channel where she talks about Asperger’s and Autism.
               
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren’t responsible for their content.
No Comments Allowed for Anonymous, please register
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 2, Interesting)
by sunshower Tuesday, March 13 @ 20:59:49 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I like your article! We have a lot in common. I often have used the same “languages” metaphor for speaking Aspie versus NT, and had a lot of the same things happen at the same ages you listed here. I am a singer and songwriter also.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 0, Flamebait)
by aussiebloke Tuesday, March 13 @ 21:17:42 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Where are all the ugly, overweight and uneducated autistics who are also loathed by their family’s? Seems they don’t exist in autiverse. Another one to make the loser Autistics feel like &*^% Is that the point of autism TV ?
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Briana_Lopez Tuesday, March 13 @ 22:23:44 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Your story in a way kind of sounds like mine! For the most part, I’ve learned to understand NT’s just by observing them and fixing each of my mistakes. And you’re a really talented singer! I might just have to be your new #1 fan 😀
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 3, Informative)
by techstepgenr8tion Tuesday, March 13 @ 22:43:37 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I don’t agree with people who feel like its flat out shameful or supplicant to meet NT’s halfway or to behave like one around them. Like you I spent most of my life checking my subtle behaviors, seeing what I could fix, bend, manipulate, rearrange, etc.. I don’t think it was until I was 20 that I really started understanding the NT mindset in a more comprehensive way and how to put on sort of a….facsimile?…. ie. something to express my thoughts and intentions in a way that they’d understand it. I went through a funny experience as well – ie. I was dx’d at 11, got a horrible message from the doctors about my future, had guy friends who essentially helped save me from the mess that I was in and by 19 or 20 I had a spell where my believe that I had anything was essentially revoked. Around that time I truly believed that if I really took a close look at the NT’s around me that I’d see traits that I liked, traits that reminded me of my best self, and that there was essentially an NT ‘me’ inside that just hadn’t had the plaster chipped away. Like anyone else on spectrum who has a while of thinking that, I found out that’s not the case, however I did learn a great deal from a lot of the rigors that I put myself through on it. IMHO its a really complicated world, NT’s have enough trouble understanding each other as it is, people have patience that are worn thin by a souring global economy and all kinds of other strange things going on, not to mention whatever hours they need to put in. They really might not have much left over for us in that sense and it seems like the better we can fend for ourselves and the better we can phrase ourselves their way on their turf the more likely it is that we can succeed, not only at life but making our case on what ASD is and what its about (effective communication skills are critical here).

Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Agemaki Wednesday, March 14 @ 01:05:06 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I think I’ve always liked to role-play but I don’t see it as a way of fitting in or learning to communicate with others. I’ve found that people aren’t as mean as they were in junior high/high school. I’m not attacked or the target of verbal aggression at least. I still don’t have much interest in making friends with most of my peers even though they are now relatively nice to me. I think a lot of this is because I prefer intellectual discussions and the sharing of ideas to other forms of discussion. I do enjoy meeting and sometimes befriending people with whom I can share ideas. Still, looking normal is just something I never think about. Some people will yell rude things at me when I use my umbrella on sunny days but I’m learning to have a stronger sense of self, placing my own visual comfort before a cultural concept of the proper and improper times to use umbrellas. Living in Japan also helped with that, since my tendency to avoid exposure to sunlight looked completely normal there. As I’ve learned more about variations on proper behavior from one culture to another I’ve come to see concepts of normalcy to be somewhat fluid and thereby I feel less bound to conform to the views of the culture that I happened to be born into.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by CyclopsSummers Wednesday, March 14 @ 02:01:59 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message | Journal) While I appreciate her initiative of trying to bridge the gap of communication between autistics and non-autistics, because I think mutual understanding is very important per individual situation, I should also wish the distinction between autistic/not autistic would not be presented as a binary thing. I say this because, aside from auties and aspies, there are still many others who aren’t autistic but struggle in their own way in this world, for example people with ADD, epilepsy, chronic migraines, Tourette’s, et cetera, some of which may also overlap with autism. I think the world isn’t taylor-made for anyone, and while it absolutely isn’t too much to ask that other people show some consideration and understanding toward us, it also goes the other way, and communication is honestly different on an individual level. Diffuse, not binary. This being said I repeat that I like Maja’s take on autism in general, and her apparent proactive stance in ‘dealing’ with it, for lack of a better word. So, I’ll hope she’ll get far with making music.

Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by jojobean Wednesday, March 14 @ 02:51:00 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I feel the same way, and had similar experiences. I can speak both NT and Autie (I am an autie, not an aspie) and I have learned the dance the social dance through observation and trial and many errors. I also agree that this does not make me any less autistic than hearing aids make me less deaf. Yes hearing aids help me hear, but the deafness is still part of me. I take my hearing aids out and I am deaf again. I use communication tools likewise to help me “hear” NT. When I hear better, I speak better. Also I like to see myself as a bridge between Aspie/Autie and NT. Jojo
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by MathGirl Wednesday, March 14 @ 04:10:28 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message | Journal) I can’t really identify much. I grew up not knowing about my diagnosis, either. I think my parents wanted to hide it from me for a purpose. But I was never really able to learn to fit in to this extent. I can act somewhat normal for, maybe, an hour, but I still don’t connect with people and then I go home and I’m utterly exhausted for the rest of the day. I don’t feel it’s worth it and I hate it. I despise this acting with all of my heart. Being able to be my true self is what I am fighting for. I feel like I have the right to be myself provided that I am respectful to other people, have genuine intentions, and contribute positively to the society. I am wary of getting close to NTs because I can’t read them. They often respond to my questions in a very vague, roundabout way. I am easy to take advantage of. I guess my brain just can’t take the concept of a nonverbal cue and generalize it to other situations. I still have trouble processing the concept of different minds, too, and it’s not something I can think of in a fluid social situation. I tend to be really deep in my head and I revel in my thoughts as I express them to people verbally. I enjoy reciprocal verbal interactions as long as they are not full of personal questions (which feels invasive) and as long as the message is clearly conveyed… and as long as it relates to my special interest. However, putting myself in NT social situations makes me feel shitty to the core because I can’t help but sense a disconnect in my communication style from their communication style. And I’m more aware of my sensory/content-processing differences now than ever before, having had things pointed out to me directly. Which makes me even more hesitant to go down that path unless I openly present myself as autistic which takes away the burden of trying to pretend to be NT. And this has been largely successful for me so far.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Ai_Ling Wednesday, March 14 @ 04:27:01 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I like your youtube channel. I’m not exactly sure what you mean by speaking aspie? Communicating with poor eye contact and rambling off monotone on your favorite obsessions? For me acting “aspie” for me means being mostly antisocial because I’m often muddled in confusion/uncomfortable with my settings.
Nice to meet you, Maja! I listened to your single – you’re very talented and thanks for sharing your music and your bio. I like that the Wrong Planet is featuring ‘real-live’ Aspies – we tend to break the mold, yes?
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by kojot Wednesday, March 14 @ 05:58:12 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Excellent article! Thank you. It’s kind of funny ’cause yesterday I was thinking about this stuff. That we’re more like just different cultures than anything else.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Zavaros Wednesday, March 14 @ 09:01:55 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I can really relate to what you have written, in fact, I may even use your metaphor to help explain my situation to NT’s. Thank you 🙂
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Chrism929 Wednesday, March 14 @ 11:18:52 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Intriguing, but I’d much rather learn exactly how she managed to learn what she did so that maybe I could use some of that knowledge even at this late stage in my life to communicate better with NTs. Someone commented there are different modes of acting, some more authentic than others, and that sounded very right to me. This is an subject I would like to learn more about from someone who has figured it out and I hope Maja will share more details of her learning process with us in the future. Good points were made by all those who complain of the glitz in role models here. I can share from experience that it’s a lot easier for a pretty young female to be accepted and thus navigate social channels – I’ve been there; am no longer, due to both major facial injuries and, now, age – but in my case it was a lifetime before I could have the benefit of this Different Planet sort of perspective on what I was, where other people were coming from, and what was happening. All I knew for most of my life was that inside, I was different. In retrospect much of the acceptance I had when I was young and attractive was meaningless but I didn’t understand that at the time, so many of my relationships were confusing and painful. I wasn’t vain so I didn’t understand that looks were so important to other people; I thought they liked me for who I was. Maja has done a wonderful job of working to overcome her difficulties as an Aspie, and thus feels her relationships/communications are more authentic. because of her acting efforts and learned skills. Maybe she’s right. Only she will know, with more time. But you can’t tell the young that. I found this article very interesting because I;ve often had the thought, in my life, that I wished I knew how to be an actor, so I could just manage situations and charm people without my soul being out there for anyone to take pot shots at; I never figured out how, though. My shyness kept me from exploring that as the only way I knew to study acting was to take classes. Anyway for me, it was more important to be real and I believed the two were antithetical. I always had the fortune to have one or two close friends who tolerated my eccentricities (and vice verse) so that’s what’s really gotten me through life, more any any skills like acting, no matter that I’ve always worked hard to understand what was going on with NTs. You act, of course, but perhaps learning actual acting skills would make that much easier? It’s very irritating to be confronted constantly by speakers-for-Aspies who are already successful (or present themselves as such) and, yes, glitzy and young – something most of us can never be even if we tried, and while the glitz can be maintained (at what cost?) the youth will go and then you get a very different view of life as people will treat you very differently. But, again, you can’t tell the young that. So, again, I hope Maja will give some practical tips on how she got where she is, communications-wise, that might be useful for others to try out.
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by Awiddershinlife Wednesday, March 14 @ 13:02:11 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I really do not see how a polarizing topic such as ?Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical? can be helpful to anyone. After all ?only a Sith deals in absolutes (Obi-Wan Kenobi)?. ?Many other aspies say that I bend to the will of NT society, by acting as if I am an NT? I assume that Maja?s critics must be ?acting Aspie? to engender such sentiment. Why are any of us acting? Other than it taking a lifetime of seeking wisdom, what is wrong with any of us simply becoming more authentic yet flexible enough to share this world with others while maintaining a measure of contentedness? Why would we begrudge Maja or any of our fellow aspies SUCCESS? My diagnosis has never gotten me an iota of assistance or compassion, so I have learned through many tough lessons that the world will not bow down to my specific needs, though I have learned to negotiate to get them reasonably well while remaining truly and uniquely me. It has taken me nearly 60 years to get this far, but I am glad to be on this pathway. I agree that ?It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a profoundly sick society (Jiddu Krishnamurti)?, but until I win a lottery big enough for me to totally isolate myself from any part of society that does not suit me (and I do buy lottery tickets to that end), I need to deal. One of the reasons I don?t hang tight with the Aspie community is that I have felt a strong expectation of conformity to ideas, politics, behavior, attitudes. Expression of differing viewpoints is generally not well tolerated. Could this be core to the accusations against Maja? I have been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome twice, once by a state mental health organization, then by a university researcher. It has helped me in my journey toward self-enlightenment, but it is not my identity. I remain a unique individual who totally embraces Aunt Frances Owens exclamation, ?My darling girl, when are you going to understand that being normal is not necessarily a virtue? It rather denotes a lack of courage (Practical Magic)! So Maja is not a ?normal? aspie any more than she is a ?normal? NT ? She is a woman of courage and to be admired for it!
i’m going to be honest about my reaction to the article. i am slightly uneasy when i am repeatedly faced with photos that look like stereotypical fashion models when i login to WP. i am a feminist and in my own ideology i take issue with the fashion industry. so when i see WP inundated with pictures of women who fit the fashion stereotypes it seems like a recipe for aspie girls to feel bad about themselves if they don’t look like that. success in the real world is something that aspies may or may not want to aspire to, but linking it with hotness gives mixed messages. using conventionally attractive women like this as an example is a way of impressing the NT community and also giving members some eye candy. but at what cost? we have a responsibility to our members to be conscious of the image we project INWARD, not just the image we project OUTWARD. even in the comments here i see the impact – girls and women are influenced by the message and seem to see beauty as something to align themselves with. how many females would be “identifying” with this article if the writer was not attractive according to society’s standards?
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by autti34 Wednesday, March 14 @ 17:32:08 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) i have autism an never can pass for nt .i think it funny when my aspie friend think they can pass for nt as most of them cant eathir they think there playing a game call i got a sercret but usly there the only one playing that game i think most of us on the asd with autism like me or as cant pass unless there very mild an then may come off quricky .
Re: Aspie or NT? The Pros and Cons of Acting Neurotypical (Score: 1)
by minervx Wednesday, March 14 @ 21:18:00 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) I congratulate Maja on her success integrating. I find it better learning how to be NT than to simply sit alone and blame NT’s for our problems.

View the original article here

The Best Way To Determine The Symptoms Of Asperger’s Symdrome In Kids

Before you can successfully treat your child’s aspergers you need to be aware of the symptoms. Besides the fact that doctors are not sure what causes aspergers it’s become a popular diagnosis lately. It’s important for you to be able to identify these symptoms of aspergers in your children.

Understanding differences in speech is difficult for a child with Asperger’s. Tone of voice and the way words get pronounced are part of the communication process that help others understand what a person means when they talk. People with Asperger’s often have trouble processing such information and therefore don’t pick up on the emotional intention of the speaker. Humor where words aren’t used literally, such as irony or sarcasm, will be difficult for them to understand.

Children with Asperger’s are also noticeably different in the way they play; they don’t like to take part in imaginative play or role playing that is typical of children. Children naturally enjoy games where they pretend to be someone else or dressing up in costumes but this kind of play is difficult for a child with Asperger’s to understand. This makes it difficult for these children to relate to others, especially those their own age. Because they don’t enjoy the games popular to other kids, a child with Asperger’s may appear dull or even unfriendly. But it’s important to realize that these kids are simply wired different and have their own interests, so you shouldn’t expect them to act like other kids.

Some of the common symptoms of Aspergers in children may make parents or teachers think the child is slow, but in other ways the opposite can be true as well. Children with Aspergers may be very advanced in their vocabulary or perhaps in a particular interest or subject at school. They may, for example, speak using formal and technical sounding words, which sometimes makes people uncomfortable, especially kids their own age. In this case, they may sound more like a teacher or professor than a young child, at least when discussing a topic of special interest to them. While this can be either amusing or annoying to others, it tends to make them stand out. This is one possible Aspergers symptom, and is not true of all kids with this condition. The more you know about Aspergers syndrome, the more you’ll be able to work with any children in your life who have this condition. Nowadays, it’s becoming easier to recognize and treat such kids, and they can more easily lead relatively normal lives. If you suspect your child has symptoms of Aspergers, the important thing is to learn how to communicate effectively with him or her, so don’t hesitate to seek any help you may need.

 

Given above symptoms of Asperger’s are ones numerous kids with this disorder will display, and the quicker it’s identified, the sooner you are able to determine a plan to work with the child in a effective way. Fitness Dragon
Article Source