Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

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Jenny asks…

5 year old’s social skills and behaviour?

Hello, i have a son who has just turned 5. He started reception this year. He is not very talkative, when it comes to having conversations. He has very good vocabulary but does not talk to his teacher or the children in his class. He is quite shy but most of the time i feel like he just cant be bothered. He never askes questions about others and just doesn’t seem interested in other children. He will shout for attention if he has something to show but not very interested in others talking. He is easily distracted in class and has to be told 5 times before he follows instructions even at home. He does not mean to misbehave and really hates upsetting others. If i ask him how his day has been, he will ignore him and if i keep asking he will say he doesn’t want to talk. He hates answering questions even at home and cries if you keep asking them. He is very sensitive and gets frustrated easily and cries easily. He is very capable of making friends but doesnt seem interested. He is also very bright and creative.
He did go to full time nursery last year and was the same. He would play for hours on his own in the sand pit or waterplay. He would only talk if he had something interesting to show. It’s funny because he does have the vocabulary. They noticed his creative skills at nursery too. I am very much in touch with his teacher and she has the same concerns, she has suggested his assessed and i agreed. He is very playful and talkative at home and has a great sense of humour. But even at home he hates being asked questions or having conversations that do not interest him.
He does show alot of asperger’s traits. Particularly his lack of social interaction. The confusing thing is he gets sarcasm too, for example if i say ‘thanks for making the mess’ he’ll say ‘sorry mummy’. Maybe that doesn’t mean much. I will definately have him evaluated, for my own peace of mind if nothing else.
He does show alot of asperger’s traits. Particularly his lack of social interaction. The confusing thing is he gets sarcasm too, for example if i say ‘thanks for making the mess’ he’ll say ‘sorry mummy’. Maybe that doesn’t mean much. I will definately have him evaluated, for my own peace of mind if nothing else.
He does show alot of asperger’s traits. Particularly his lack of social interaction. The confusing thing is he gets sarcasm too, for example if i say ‘thanks for making the mess’ he’ll say ‘sorry mummy’. Maybe that doesn’t mean much. I will definately have him evaluated, for my own peace of mind if nothing else.

admin answers:

It is very obvious to me that this is asperger’s syndrome. Suggest the O.A.S.I.S. Guide to asperger’s syndrome by Barb Kirby. It is part of the autistic spectrum. Many of those with asperger’s tend to have a higher IQ. Social skills are delayed and its something that you will continue to work on with him. Those with asperger’s follow rules well. A great book by Dr. Jed Baker is the social skills communication picture book that depicts the wrong way and then the right way. Suggest setting some rules like stop look and listen, inside voice. Yes those with asperger’s are very aloof.

That is very funny to me about him not wanting the questions about his day. My son, who is 8 and PDD.NOS (autistic features that include typical features, autistic and asperger features) says all the time, mom no more talking!

The not talking to anybody can be anxiety based too though his typical demeanor is shy. Getting frustrated easily and crying can be anxiety. Anxiety is a component that usually accompanies those on the autistic spectrum but it also stands by itself a lot too.

He thinks differently, and probably has some amazing art work.

The distraction and difficulty following directions:
Attention disorders do go hand and hand with those on the autistic spectrum as well.

Language disorders, especially pragmantic do roll with this diagnosis frequently too.

Auditory processing disorders also accompany the symptoms.

My son who is 8 has been diagnosed with all of these. Does he really have all of them, doubtful, but there is significant overlap.

He is diagnosed
PDD.NOS (atypical autism)
ADD.NOS (features of an attention deficit disorder)
CAPD (central auditory processing disorder)
Pragmatic disorder, mixed expressive and receptive language disorder

So does he really not understand spoken language (receptive) or is it the auditory processing?

Is he really ADD or is it bipolar, or SPD (which he has as well) sensory processing disorder or the CAPD

here is a good PDD assessment (PDD is the umbrella term that encompasses all of the autistic spectrum disorders)
http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html

SPD
http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/sensory-processing-disorder-checklist.html
the sand pit and water play, excellent, that is code for sensory processing, both are sensory based and he is giving his body what it needs, precisely what an OT would do for him

A pediatric neurologist is the way to go, developmental pediatricians don’t give as much feedback, child psychologists/psychiatrists-some are good, most are not and would try to convince you he needs medication and there is nothing here at all that suggests that to me.

Conversations are learned and it takes time. My 8 yr old loves to answer the phone, but continues to abruptly hang up on anyone that is boring him. He easily gets annoyed with chit-chat and I don’t get it myself being autistic as well. He asked me why is it that everybody everywhere always asks How was your day or How’s it goin but they don’t want the real answer. They want you to say fine, good, ok but if you tell them how you really feel they act as if you turned into a martian. Funny to me how someone with delayed social skills, who is poor at reading nonverbal behavior including facial expressions can get it and be so perceptive. And I have no answer for this, and feel its fake, yet its rude of us to ignore these q and not give the expected response.

For his day, ask specific questions and you will get a response and he won’t be agitated by it. Ask what was the letter of the day? What game did you play in gymclass? Who did you play with during free time/recess? My son’s favorite q is who got in trouble today? He loves to dish on who threw up, got hurt, said a bad word, broke a pencil etc.

The autism asperger’s publication co.
Http://www.asperger.net

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