Category Archives: Autism

Autistic Repetitive Behavior

What is meant by autistic repetitive behavior? And why do autistic children engage in this behavior?

First we need to understand what autism is?

Autism is a life long disorder affecting the brain, some of the symptoms of autism are:

Communication difficulties

Social deficits

Imagination and Interaction deficit…

Autism can not be cured and as yet research has not defined the cause of autism spectrum disorder, there are at present various thoughts on the root cause of autism spectrum disorder.

Most autistic children and adults will engage in some form of repetitive behavior…

What is autistic repetitive behavior?

A repetitive behavior is something a person does repeatedly without reason or thought. Research shows repetition is common in autism all autistic children and adults will like repetition and sameness in all aspects of their lives.

Some autistic repetitive behavior is thought to be because of an overload in sensory input. Autistic children and adults are very sensitive and can be easily overwhelmed by their environment.

Therefore the autistic child or person will engage in a repetitive behavior such as finger flicking, rocking or other stimming behavior as a means of calming their senses.

Some autistic children and adults can be very sensitive to touch and will shy away from physical contact, preferring not to be touched, which can be quite hard to understand as a parent.

Research suggests autistic repetitive behavior can be a means of controlling sensory overload in autistic children and adults. We all engage in some form of repetitive behavior at some point in our lives, we like to pick the same lottery numbers, we wont miss our soaps, we must leave the remote in a certain place etc…all forms of repetitive behavior.

Autistic repetitive behavior in autistic children and adults can be helped by using autism social stories

Autism social stories can be implemented to help control behaviors such as stimming.

Pictorially rich with appropriate text these specific expertly written autism tools can be used to manage almost all aspects and situations the autistic child is finding confusing, stressful or makes them anxious.

They give the autistic child or adult clear instruction of how, where, why and when, helping them control their senses and make sense of the world around them.

To download autism social stories for behaviors visit:

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

autism social stories can be used to help teach and manage all autistic behaviors
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Autistic Self Injury, Autism Self Harming Autistic Children

Research into the cause and frequency of autism self harming behavior in autistic children shows that depending on the functioning level of the child and IQ that up to 70% of children with a range of intellectual disabilities are likely to self harm.

Studies into low functioning autism show an increased probability autistic self injury behavior.

Autism self harming behaviors are sometimes referred to as self mutilation, self destructive, or masochistic behaviors. Behavior specialists will sometimes categorize self harming behaviors in autistic children as autistic repetitive stereotypical behaviors, with the proposed difference being at the moment of self injury.

Autistic repetitive stereotypical behaviors can have a very wide range from finger picking which is classed as mild to severe head banging which of cause is serious and will have damaging affects.

The autistic self injury will vary between individuals and will largely depend on the circumstances and environmental input at the time of the self harming autism behavior.

One theory for why autistic children use self harming autism behavior is that of self – stimulation. Autistic children are either classed as being over sensitive or under sensitive to their environment.

One set of repetitive stereotypical autistic behaviors or autistic stimming (hand flapping, rocking, finger tapping, and spinning) is used in under aroused autistic individuals to provide sensory stimulation.

Suitable behavior management strategies can be put used to help control and mange repetitive stereotypical autistic behaviors.

One autism resources is “autism social skills stories”. For example: Jessie is a seven year old autistic child that uses the self harming autistic behavior of finger picking.

Her OT suggested using social skills stories to help Jessie find strategies for dealing with this behavior and a suitable social skills story was put in place to help Jessie control and manage this autistic behavior. 

A summary report on Jessie’s autistic behavior after two weeks showed a vast improvement in Jessie’s autistic self harming behavior after the social skill story had been implemented and reported less incidence of finger picking.

Such autism resources as autism social skills stories are used effectively in controlling and managing autism self harming behaviors. Research shows autistic children respond well to visual support in the form of autism social skills stories.

Autistic behaviors such as autistic stimming can be helped using autism social skills stories.

Immediate download from:

 www.autismsocialstories.com.behavior

autism social skills stories can be used for a wide variety of autistic behaviors. They can also be used to teach social skills effectively like tooth brushing, visiting the dentis, good eating habits and so on. Get immediate downloads of over 100 social skills stories from www.autismsocialstories.com
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Autism And Nutrition – Can Autism Diets Help Recover A Child From Autism?

Autism And Nutrition

With autism among children rising to astounding rates of 1 in 150 children worldwide, it is the fastest growing childhood epidemic of our time. The number of children affected by this whole-body disorder is expected to rise even further over the next decade. According to research reports, more children will be diagnosed with autism this year than cancer, diabetes, Downs Syndrome and AIDS combined. Approximately 1 million individuals in the United States have autism—as of today, there is no known cause and no known cure.

You know the statistics. You are keenly aware of how interesting your path has become-a life you didn’t exactly imagine you would be in. You see the autism awareness ad campaigns on television. You hear a new president dedicate himself to helping children with autism through research dollars and insurance coverage requirements. You are connected to your local autism support group. You participate in lively debate over genetics, vaccines, ABA therapy and a new topic-biomedical intervention and autism diets.

You may be watching your child carefully stack cans on top of one another—over and over for hours, instead of playing with toys and other children. You serve French fries day after day, because they might be the only thing your child will eat. You’ve decided that “hope for recovery from autism” is an interesting collection of words-but do they really fit into your world? Autism And Nutrition

You hear the word “recovery” more and more lately. How can your child recover from autism? Is it really possible? Parents you know are coming back from conferences enlightened and hopeful. The terms “biomedical intervention” and “autism diet” are rising to the top of conversations, literature and web sites. Of course you would be curious.

Autism And Nutrition

With autism among children rising to astounding rates of 1 in 150 children worldwide, it is the fastest growing childhood epidemic of our time. The number of children affected by this whole-body disorder is expected to rise even further over the next decade. According to research reports, more children will be diagnosed with autism this year than cancer, diabetes, Downs Syndrome and AIDS combined. Approximately 1 million individuals in the United States have autism—as of today, there is no known cause and no known cure.

You know the statistics. You are keenly aware of how interesting your path has become-a life you didn’t exactly imagine you would be in. You see the autism awareness ad campaigns on television. You hear a new president dedicate himself to helping children with autism through research dollars and insurance coverage requirements. You are connected to your local autism support group. You participate in lively debate over genetics, vaccines, ABA therapy and a new topic-biomedical intervention and autism diets.

You may be watching your child carefully stack cans on top of one another—over and over for hours, instead of playing with toys and other children. You serve French fries day after day, because they might be the only thing your child will eat. You’ve decided that “hope for recovery from autism” is an interesting collection of words-but do they really fit into your world? Autism And Nutrition

You hear the word “recovery” more and more lately. How can your child recover from autism? Is it really possible? Parents you know are coming back from conferences enlightened and hopeful. The terms “biomedical intervention” and “autism diet” are rising to the top of conversations, literature and web sites. Of course you would be curious.

Autism And Nutritionis a proven Autism Solution for your Child.TryAutism, Aspergers, ASD Program and change child’s life forever!”
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teaching autistic students

Making the hard decision to educate your autistic child in mainstream education is never going to be an easy one.

Generally speaking a lot of the methods used in mainstream education will not necessarily suit an autistic youngster.

For example most normally developing children will be able to learn using various methods like for example visually, kinesthetically and using auditory learning.

Where as with the autistic child this may not be the case and there for certain conditions within the mainstream classroom should be taken into account before the autistic youngster starts school.

For example teaching students with autism can be helped by remembering most autistic children will be visual learners and will respond better to lessons that are taught visually.

So by adding pictures, images and visual cues or prompts to lessons especially those lessons that involve class teaching will improve the chances of the autistic student understanding and staying focused.

Most autistic children if in mainstream education will have the ability to cope with the education aspect of mainstream school but will probably struggle with the social, communication, imagination and interaction aspects of a normal classroom.

These are the main areas of difficulty for most autistic youngsters. They lack the social and communication abilities of their normally developing peers, which can lead to social isolation and at times even bullying.

Therefore when making preparations for teaching students with autism autistic educators would be well advised to remember this.  As well as making the appropriate changes or modifications to the classroom.

An autistic educators can gain an advantage by taking certain aspects into consideration like making the classroom visually more suitable for the autistic student, by this I mean adding appropriate visual aids and prompts around the class, like a picture of the toilet over the bathroom a coat above their coat peg and so on by doing this you will relieve a lot of the anxieties the autistic student may have.

Another good idea would be the introduction of autism visual aids for the autistic youngster like visual schedules and social skills stories.

Both the visual schedule and social skills stories will help the autistic student find repetition, instruction, and structure all things an autistic student will need to be able to learn effectively.

The autism social stories will act as a guide, friend, instruction and coping method. Evidence proves autism social skills stories are well placed in the autism classroom and can provide clarity to those situations like recess, break time, dinner time and lessons that the autistic student may struggle to cope with.

To download autism social stories for helping autistic students and for helping prepare for teaching autistic students visit:

www.autismsocialstories.com/school  and download 48 autism classroom social stories for autistic students.

Or for other autism social skills stories and resources visit:

www.autismsocialstories.org.uk

All social skills stories for autism classrooms as well as other social skills stories and resources can be downloaded and implemented with our full support from www.autismsocialstories.org.uk
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Autism Symptom Checklist – The Importance of Keeping an Autism Symptoms Checklist

Autism is a neurological disorder that may lead to drastic damage at behavioral, communication and social interactions level. Usually verified during the first periods of life, autism is believed to be a serious condition the present determines abnormalities in the development of children. Autism Symptom Checklist

The above all autism symptoms can sometimes be observed at birth. However, the presence of these kinds of a disorder is typically shown later, at ages virtually one or two years. Children with autism may encounters milder forms of the disorder, or, on the contrary, they may be affected by a large amount of severe forms of autism. Autism is a disorder that affects the way people relate to others, perceive and express feelings, communicate with other people, behave and adapt to new situations.

At the first sight, a person who suffers from autism appears to be normal and in fact, autistic people aren’t very different from people not affected by the disorder. Some autistic people have average and above average IQ’s, and the disorder affects people regardless of their intelligence level. People with autism usually focus their intelligence towards working with numbers, excelling in areas like mathematics. Despite the fact that many autistic people are very intelligent, they are unable to express themselves or to properly relate to other people. They usually have low emotional intelligence and behaviors targeted towards the self. Parents suspecting that their children might be affected by autism should pay careful attention to autism symptoms.

If autism symptoms are spotted soon, the damage done by the disorder can be controlled. Autistic children that receive the appropriate treatment, special care and attention, are less likely to develop severe forms of the disorder. Therefore, speed is vital in detecting the first autism symptoms. Parents that notice abnormalities in the behavior of their children should consider keeping track of autism symptoms with the help an autism symptoms checklist. It is best to keep an autism symptom checklist and to verify the responsiveness of children earlier than the age of two years, in order to be able to intervene in the development of the disorder. Autism Symptom Checklist

Here is an autism symptoms checklist presenting the most common autism symptoms to small children and babies:

– inappropriate verbal and non-verbal communication skills;

– strong resistance to environmental and behavioral change (autistic children don’t let people interfere with their routine, engaging in repetitive, stereotype behaviors and activities; they also have low adaptability to new situations);

– hyper-activity or hypo-activity (autistic children usually have extreme behaviors; they are either very active, being difficult to calm down, or passive, avoiding any interactions and showing little responsiveness to stimuli);

– inability to understand and act in the presence of danger (autistic children usually don’t seem to be aware of potential dangers);

– poor imitational skills (inability of imitating simple gestures or facial expressions);

– low responsiveness to the hearing of their own name;

– difficulties in social interactions, avoidance of making eye contact with people;

– the tendency of engaging in activities and behaviors that may result in self-harm (banging their heads against their cribs, excessively scratching their skin);

– poor emphatic skills (children with autism experience difficulties in relating with other people; they also can’t express their compassion or understanding to people in distress).

These autism symptoms presented above are the most common signs of abnormalities that children with the disorder might present and it is very important to spot them as soon as possible. Autism Symptom Checklist

This autism symptoms checklist should guide you in revealing the presence of autism during children’s first years of life. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Autism Symptom Checklist program now!

Autism Anxiety Overload

The renowned autism expert Tony Atwood is fond of putting it this way: “Autism is anxiety looking for a target.” Autism and anxiety go hand-in-hand. Autism affects a person’s ability to communicate with others or to understand the world around him, and that’s bound to cause anxiety and panic sometimes.

Anxiety becomes even worse when there is a change in the autistic child’s routine. Even positive and “fun” changes, like a school field trip or a visit to the zoo, can increase anxiety and aggressive behaviors.

For parents, the best course of action is to anticipate upcoming changes and help your child prepare for them. Many parents find it helpful to use stories and pictures to prepare children for impending disruptions. If it’s a field trip to the zoo, for example, use pictures to show your child what he’ll see at the zoo, what the zoo will be like, and what sort of things to expect. Do this each day for three or four days prior to the trip. That way, when the trip actually happens, the child won’t be entirely out of his element, but will already understand and appreciate some of what will be happening.

Other changes in the routine are less enjoyable but still necessary. Getting a new teacher can be traumatic, as can moving to a new house. If at all possible, try to spread out the major changes. If you move to a new house, try to do it during the summer, so that your child won’t have to deal with the added anxiety of getting a new school and new teacher mid-year.

You can also introduce your child to the concept of “change” in a positive way by practicing with non-negative things. For example, just for practice, give him a little extra TV time instead of homework time one night, to show that changes in the routine can often be fun and good. Then practice with a neutral change (homework after dinner instead of before dinner), then with a negative one (changing play time into chore time). This process can help your child grow accustomed to the idea of change and learn to adapt without becoming anxious.

For continual, ongoing anxiety, many parents have begun using anti-anxiety medications for their autistic children. Usually, the medications are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and are also used for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. Prozac, Luvox, Zoloft and Anafranil are all common for anxiety in autistic children.

For behavioral problems, antipsychotics such as Haldol, fluphenazine and chlorpromazine can be prescribed. These can reduce aggression in autistic kids, but sometimes also cause sedation and muscle stiffness.

All patients are different. You and your doctor should monitor your child’s progress very closely, using the lowest dose of medication possible, to see if what improvements it makes and whether there are any adverse reactions. Medication should be the last resort for autism, not the first one. There are a number of natural remedies available if you don’t want to go down the drug route. But try behavioral and dietary modifications first, to see what improvements can be made naturally.

There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating Autism in, The Essential Guide To Autism – for more info – Click Here

Sign Of Autism In Toddlers – 4 Easy Tips To Effectively Deal With Early Signs Of Autism

Sign Of Autism In Toddlers

There are 4 easy tips to consider in the beginning about dealing with early signs of Autism. These are things many times parents of adult children with Autism do not think to talk about with younger parents. These tips can help parents with the confidence they need early on.

1. If you have older children you have children you can make comparisons between them. Yes I know everyone told me not to compare my children too. While that is true on many levels this is a little different situation. You are using your gut instincts to judge if there is a problem that needs further investigation. Sign Of Autism In Toddlers

2. If you do not have older children find some. You can usually find younger children at the fast food play ground or Mother’s Day Out programs. Ask relatives with children a little older what they think.

3. Even though all children develop differently it can give you a rough idea of what should be going on. Now and later in you and your child’s life you will want to know older children with and without Autism.

4. Make a list of the similarities and differences. This list will come in handy. Parents will be able to use it with doctors and therapist and even with the early intervention system in their state. You will want to update your list every 6 months or every year. Years from now you will want to keep a record of what was happening during this time. Sometimes it is hard to see how far we have come if we don’t keep a written record. Sign Of Autism In Toddlers


About the Author:
Sign Of Autism In Toddlersis a proven Autism Solution for your Child.
TryAutism, Aspergers, ASD Program and change child’s life forever!”
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How To Show Love To an Autistic Child

One of the most pervasive myths that surround autism is that a child who has it will never show affection and can’t accept getting affection from anyone. There have been literally piles of stories of parents taking their child to a psychologist and the doctor telling the parents that your child can’t possibly be autistic because he gives you a hug now and then. While this opinion is just flat wrong, studies have shown that autistic children do process sensory touch differently than a non-autistic child and that this is where the myth that autistic children don’t like to be touched comes from.

Autism and the way it affects kids really runs the gamut from light to severe. An excellent point to remember when dealing with an autistic child is that every single autistic child is different and will react to almost everything differently. Here are some tips for showing your autistic child affection, and remember, your experience may vary.

  • Trial and error. For some kids with more severe autism, a simple, random hug can be sensory overload. They can become agitated, upset and even violent if they are touched without prior warning. You will probably need to have a trial and error approach when it comes to hugging and touching your autistic child. Some methods may be responded to in a positive way, other ways won’t be. You just have to try and see.
  • Let the child come to you. If you think your autistic child needs a hug, instead of rushing into his personal space and just taking one, speak to the child, bend down to his/her level and open your arms. Smile and let the child know that they are loved and see what the response is. If they don’t come running in for a hug, don’t be offended, it may just not have been the right time for the child.
  • Try hand signals. If your child is too sensitive to hugs or touches to show affection, you can try positive reinforcement in addition to hand singles. Things like a simple thumbs up accompanied by a smile and some positive comments can let the child know they are loved and what they did was good. You can also offer the child a chance to hug during these situations and they might just take you up on it.
  • Make sure everyone is on the same page. If you, the parents, are starting to make progress on getting your autistic child to be more affectionate, you don’t need a sibling, teacher or grandparent who doesn’t know or understand your child’s boundaries messing up all of your hard work. If you’ve begun to implement an affection program with your autistic child, make sure everyone who would possibly try to hug or touch him/her knows the rules. Consistency and repetition are crucial to autistic kids, and this applies to a situation like this, as well.

Trying to figure out a puzzling condition like autism can be a lifelong challenge. For many parents, the affection issue may be the biggest. But with patience and learning to go by the child’s cues and not your own, you will be able to connect with your child in a deep and meaningful way.

There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating Autism in, The Essential Guide To Autism – Click Here

Overcoming Food Obsessions

The general public often doesn’t realize what parents of autistic children are keenly aware of: It is a physical condition as much as a mental one. Research shows that more than 50 percent of autistic children have gastrointestinal problems such as Crohns Disease or colitis. Some scientists theorize that autism begins in the gut, with the gastrointestinal walls being damaged and allowing toxins to leak into the bloodstream and affect brain activity.

For this reason, parents of children with autism must monitor not just their children’s behavior but their eating habits, too. In particular, products containing gluten (found in wheat, barley and rye) and casein (found in dairy products) seem to exacerbate autism symptoms, apparently because the person’s body cannot digest them properly and the incompletely digested (and therefore poisonous) proteins are leaking into the circulatory system.

A gluten-free, casein-free diet, known as GFCF, has become very popular among parents of autistic children. Some members of the medical community continue to be skeptical of it, but other doctors and organizations — including those working with Defeat Autism Now (DAN) — wholeheartedly support the GFCF diet.

Many parents report remarkable improvements in their autistic children after removing gluten and casein from their diets. They find their children having longer attention spans, making better eye contact and in general behaving less aggressively and more “normally.”

The difficult part is implementing the diet. Cereals and dairy products comprise a major part of the typical American diet. People with gluten allergies already know how hard it is to find gluten-free products; adding dairy to the list of prohibited items makes it that much more inconvenient.

In addition, many autistic children will latch on to particular foods they like and refuse to eat anything else. Since so many foods have gluten or casein, chances are good that something on your child’s “favorites” list will be an offender. Also, because gluten and casein foods act as opiates, autistic children may crave them in particular — the very foods that are doing them the most harm!

So weaning your child off these foods can be difficult. To start with, many parents find it best to eliminate dairy. A lot of people are lactose-intolerant, after all, and dairy products don’t make up nearly as big a part of most people’s diets as gluten products do. It’s fairly easy to replace casein foods with other things.

Gluten is trickier. Not only is it in a lot of foods, but even foods that don’t have it are often contaminated with it, due to having been processed in the same facilities. You’ll need to examine ingredients lists carefully, and check with the manufacturer directly if you’re in doubt.

Often, parents say their autistic children won’t eat anything else, and they worry they’ll go hungry if these foods are taken away. It is necessary to be loving but firm, and not to give in if your child behaves badly in response to having his or her favorite foods taken off the menu. Within a few weeks, you’ll probably see a change in your child’s behavior, and you may be surprised at what he or she will eat that previously was unacceptable.

For More information about treating and managing Autism please There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating Autism in, The Essential Guide To Autism – Click Here

Activities for Autistic Children

Please can you offer some activity-based suggestions and PE/games options for autistic children that they can do at home or at school. Looking at two age groups here 7 – 10 and 11-16.

Parents, teachers, and other caregivers often get so caught up in educating and providing structure to the lives of autistic children that they forget that, above all, he or she is a child. Like any other child in his or her age group, your autistic child wants to have fun. While some activities may not be suitable for those suffering from autism, there are a number of fun games to play with autistic children, many of which can get them involved with others or help them further develop motor or social skills while just focusing on having a good time.

Autistic children in the elementary school age range can benefit greatly from song. Even children who do not verbally communicate with words can learn to hum along or play simple instruments, such as tambourines or whistles. Using sounds that are repetitive and with educational lyricshelps autistic children learn school lessons but also gives them an outlet for some of the sensory stimulation they need, such as yelling. Play follow the leader with the instruments to help the children focus their attention and improve socialization skills.

Depending on how mature your child is, he or she may also not only be able to participate in regular childhood games, but greatly benefit from them as well. These activities, including tag and other games, can be learned more easily than you think. Stick with games in which the autistic child is not forced to have close physical contact with other children, as this may be hurtful for autistic individuals. Also, remember to play to your child’s strengths or what he or she wishes to learn. If he or she has a problem with yelling inappropriately, for example, encouraging him or her to be involved with a game of hide and seek may help curb this behavior.

Autistic children often wish to be included in games with non-autistic peers, and so this may help with the learning process. At home, focus on games that involve closer contact with trusted family members. For example, make it a game to get across the room without touching the floor. Perhaps the only route in some instances is to be carried. Remember that each child is different developmentally, so stay in tune with how challenging the activities should be.

As your child matures, he or she may want to be involved with organized sports. This should be encouraged, but choose your sport carefully. Golf, baseball, and other sports that do not involve strong personal sensory stimulation may be better for your child than something like tackle football. However, be open to all possibilities. Be sure the team’s coach understands your child’s disability and is willing to work with him or her.

At this later developmental stage, also continue encouraging learning activities. Sensory games work well to further teach these children, and as they mature emphasize the importance of appropriate behavior as you are playing these games. Using things like water balloons in games your child already enjoys is often as fun for children with autism. Also realize that an autistic individual has trouble seeing things from another’s point of view. Therefore, they may be less likely to enjoy games in which something must be kept a secret from another person (like go-fish).

Overall, you and your child need to grow together. Remember that although he or she has many special needs, sometimes your child needs to simply be a kid as well. Encourage play along with work, and realize that games and activities for autistic children may fulfil two key elements, socialization skills for life and learning to enjoy playing with their peers.

There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating Autism in, The Essential Guide To Autism – Click Here